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Razorcake #87


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No Idea Records

Record Reviews

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BOBBY SOX:
Scavenger of Death b/w Hate in the ‘80s: 7”
This is a “fanclub release” (nudge, nudge, wink, wink) of a super-obscuro, collectors-go-crazy-for ‘79 Dallas band. It’s wonderfully shitty. The production’s pretty much ass and the drum sounds just a little better than a sponge getting thwocked. Yet, despite the audial limitations, the band mined similar fields as the Necros at one-half speed (a little metally, a little gruff) while tweaking one of Devo’s nipples (creative repetition and drone), so it’s nice and deranged and completely out of left field – which I pretty much figure how they were regarded as, now as well as then: a small band of aliens in the middle of big, fucking prairie that most people would want to shoot and a small band of people who love the hell out of ‘em, just for trying and making their lives a wee more interesting. –Todd Taylor (www.stickmenwithrayguns.com)


BOBBY SOX:
Scavenger of Death b/w Hate in the : 7"
This is a “fanclub release” (nudge, nudge, wink, wink) of a super-obscuro, collectors-go-crazy-for ‘79 Dallas band. It’s wonderfully shitty. The production’s pretty much ass and the drum sounds just a little better than a sponge getting thwocked. Yet, despite the audial limitations, the band mined similar fields as the Necros at one-half speed (a little metally, a little gruff) while tweaking one of Devo’s nipples (creative repetition and drone), so it’s nice and deranged and completely out of left field – which I pretty much figure how they were regarded as, now as well as then: a small band of aliens in the middle of big, fucking prairie that most people would want to shoot and a small band of people who love the hell out of ‘em, just for trying and making their lives a wee more interesting. –Todd Taylor (www.stickmenwithrayguns.com)


BOBBY VACANT & THE WORN:
Dirty Touchscreen: 7”
A side is a slice of Velvets-influenced skronk. Flip is a pretty, acoustic guitar-driven ballad.  –Jimmy Alvarado (bobbyvacantandtheworn.com)


BOBBYTEENS, THE:
Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’: CD
Boy, Maddy’s gonna be mad at me for not passing this CD along to her. It’s Lucky Charms, all the way. Female-fronted pop punk in the vein of Nikki and the Corvettes and, well, shit, all the bands that have tried to be the Bobbyteens. This is what the Donnas would sound like if they had any talent. This is what a generation of leather-jacketed tough punk rock girls have wanted to sound like, and with good reason. It’s definitely worth picking up.  –Guest Contributor (Estrus)


BOBBYTEENS, THE:
Back in the Saddle: Cassette
The Bobbyteens are the queens of snotty punk and roll and here you get a twenty-seven song sampler on one affordable cassette. This collection pulls songs from 7”s, comps and includes big chunks of their full-length albums. “Gonna Get Down” and “Baby Doll” deserve punk classic status. Essential. This tape is the perfect accessory if you plan to chew gum, lean on a jukebox, or steal a Datsun. –Billups Allen (Burger)


BOBOT ADRENALINE:
Dumb Bomb: CD
This is another solid effort from L.A.’s punkabilly trio. It’s stuffed to the gills with rockabilly riffs, gang choruses, and armchair politicking. Confronting militarism, war, and poverty, Bobot is the very articulate mouthpiece for the disenfranchised. While The Clash influences bleed through in “East of the Docks” and “Blast,” where the latter’s guitar structures are pretty close to “London Calling,” Bobot is not content to mimic. Striking a balance between melodic sway and roiling drums, I think this is their best work yet. If you’re in the L.A. area, check ‘em out. Recommended. –Kristen K (Basement)


BOBSLEIGH BABY:
Self-titled: CD
Wow. This Italian garage album is a very striking, energetic debut from a young garage-folk-punk band from Rome, Italy. Reminiscent of the Violent Femmes, but with dual male/female vocals and with raw, lo-fi production, Bobsleigh Baby is a winner. The lyrics are sung in heavily accented English, with a haunting quality to them. The drums are uncommonly high in the mix, adding to the punch. They self-describe as post-punk, but I’m failing to see the post part. Unless the post part is post-dated. –Art Ettinger –Todd Taylor (Jeetkune, jeetkunerecords.blogspot.com))


BODIES LAY BROKEN:
Discursive Decomposing Disquisitions of Moldered Malapropisms and Sedulous Solec: CD
I was shocked into silence by this. I mean, I knew full well that I was going to hate it, but DAMN! Seriously guys, twenty-three of twenty-seven songs are Latin names for diseases of one sort or another (but I’m glad you threw “Chudbot” in there for good measure!). The music? Well let’s just say that it’s grindcore of the most nonsensical degree. The vocals sound like a combination of the spit suction at the dentist and trying to hock up that elusive loogie that has been irritating your throat for the last half an hour. Granted, I might not be the right person to review this, but I am the right one to point out that if these guys had put as much effort into the English on the disc as the Latin, the spine might not have read “Bodies Lay Borken.” Painful. –Ty Stranglehold (One Percent)


BODIES LAY BROKEN:
Eximenious Execration of Exiguous Exequies: CD
Ah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha. I love this: twenty-seven short blasts of Carcass-worshipping goregrind. With song titles like “Embrocate Indiscutient Hirudinea Poultice” and “Acedic Intransigent Bougienale Hordeolum,” I’m sure you can imagine what this sounds like. I wonder, when this band plays live, how do they write their set lists? It obviously takes longer to write out and correctly spell the song titles than it does to play (and probably even write) the songs, but it’s all a part of the charm of this. Not something I’d actually ever listen to, but it’s great to pull out one night while drinking with friends to play for a few minutes and laugh at the song titles. –ben (Deathvomit)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: LP
I was excited about getting this, because I know that some of my Razorcake cohorts love this band. I hate to say this, but I was really disappointed. For some reason, I expected these guys to sound tougher. While I wouldn’t call this pop punk, it’s definitely too poppy for my tastes. The singer’s voice doesn’t have a hint of rasp in it, which is usually the element that can save a band like this for me. The music never strives for more than the basic three-chords-and-an-attitude vibe, except there’s no attitude. This isn’t horrible, but it just lacks power and spark. To make matters worse, there is no lyric sheet and no information about the band or label. –Dan Yemin (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: CD
It seems appropriate to mention, while reviewing a recording by a band called “The Bodies,” just how much the act of reviewing music is like conducting an autopsy—an autopsy on something that’s not dead yet. As the philosopher Christmas Humphrey once said (and I’m going purely on memory here, so I’m paraphrasing) “once something has been successfully defined, it has been successfully killed.” That being the case, I’m going to gallantly serve up a review of this re-packaging of the Bodies’ first record (plus bonus tracks) which will be rife with utterly inadequate descriptions of the music contained therein. All so you—the punk music epicureans—can enjoy the lively melodic pop punk sounds of this recording without the unsightly scar tissue of my having poked and prodded around getting in the way. So here goes: edgy, fun, neurotic, happy music played with guitars to a punk rock beat. There. Now forget I said any of that and go buy the disc. –aphid (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: CD
This is, what, the third time I’ve reviewed these songs? No matter, for there are worse ways to while the time away. Gotta hand it to these guys; they’ve put out some mighty fine listening and this is easily the cream of the crop, a veritable Cock Sparrer-via-the-Damned orgy of driving beats and great hooks. Years have passed since I first perused this cornucopia of sonic bliss and it still manages to, once again, make it into heavy rotation. For the third time in a row, this comes highly recommended. –Jimmy Alvarado (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Firepower Is Our Business: CDEP
The Bodies are as catchy as they sound mean. They’re working class. And, thankfully, they don’t oi it up, since they’re from America. They just look like regular dudes – jeans and t-shirts. And they rock out. And they drink a lot when they play, which is endearing. What’s disarming is that Abe’s voice could easily be on a pop punk album. It’s very smooth, very easy to listen to, and he does this thing called enunciation instead of gargling marbles in a Cockney-affected accent. It’s refreshing. The band plays flawless, powerful punk rock, and although they’re from the bombing range around San Francisco, they sound like the very best of true Orange County punk. Slicing wire guitars, punished drums, bubbling bass melodies, and a solo-less experience. And although I essentially disagree with their supporting of the death penalty (but take their point that scumbags should get their due) and don’t quite share wanting to wave the flag with them, I can’t but help cranking the stereo and singing along. The music’s just too good to dismiss on small points of political disagreement, especially since the times I’ve seen them play, they’ve been really nice guys. (I think most of these songs were previously released on both Vulture Rock and Radio, sans the last track, but I’ve been known to fuck up.) –Todd Taylor (TKO)


BODIES, THE:
3Brandnewsongs: 7"
I often sit and wonder what would have happened to the Bouncing Souls if they didn't start treading water in the songwriting department a couple years back. Abe's voice reminds me of 'em. I wonder what would happen if the Crowd got into a time warp dealie and were transmigrated to Northern Califonia in the '00s. Then rubbed raw against concrete. I no longer have to wonder. When I saw these guys, they were so fucked up, I really think they were all playing a different song at the same time for about a minute, then they gave up. Such endearing behavior always puts a check mark and smiley face near your name in my book. I bet, to woo the ladies, they line up all the chunks from their puke and spell out the girl's name before falling back into the splooge. Three short, effective, and catchy splashes in bright green vinyl. Hostage Records' only non-SoCal band. Good stuff. –Todd Taylor (Hostage)


BODIES, THE:
Angel on the Nine: 7”
Seriously, how long have The Bodies been promising a new 7”? Eight years or so, I think. I never thought the day would come, but here it is in my hands. I’ll tell you this: It would be easy to think that these two songs were recorded way back whenever they released something last. They sound exactly like they did a decade ago. The good news is that is the BEST THING EVER! I love The Bodies so much! The bass-driven songs that bounce around in your skull for weeks at a time and you don’t get mad about it. Abe’s vocals jumping all over it, rattling with precision. The shout-back choruses... THE BODIES ARE BACK! Now let’s have an LP, preferably before I start collecting my old age pension. –Ty Stranglehold (Modern Action)


BODIES, THE:
“Angel on the Nine” b/w “Open Your Eyes”: 7”

The past ten years have been unpredictable. No longer is TKO at the top of the heap of American street punk and oi. Duane Peters isn’t releasing a new record every six months. The Reducers SF haven’t been heard of for a long time, either have the Anti-Heroes. Hostage Records is woefully missed. And in the middle of it all, The Bodies somehow manage to exist like slow-moving glaciers. Never the fastest on the trigger on a release date, these guys from Sonoma have become synonymous with no-nonsense, American-made, full-throttle punk (street or otherwise). To those who’ve never heard them, there’s more than a passing blush to the tightest, toughest Bouncing Souls. To those that are familiar with their output, these two songs are right down the Bodies well-constructed, almost seamless alley.

–Todd Taylor (Modern Action, modernarctionrecords.com)


BODIES, THE: Angel on the Nine: 7” single:
Angel on the Nine: 7” single
Had no idea this band was still functioning. The last time I had seen them was at Headline Records with the Trust Fund Babies around 1998/1999. Two new songs of punk rock that reminds me of a rawer Stitches. Despite being from Sonoma, I hear a big OrangeCounty influence in their sound. It’s tuneful, catchy, fast, and clean. “Open Your Eyes” is the faster of the two, and the one I listen to the most. “Angel on the Nine” is a bit more poppier, and, in a way, it holds the song back. Not a bad song, but when paired with what’s on the B side, it doesn’t have as much heat. –Matt Average ((Modern Action)


BODY FUTURES:
Brand New Silhouettes: LP
Body Futures, at their best play, straight forward power pop with strong female vocals. Cheap Trick with Chrissie Hynde. At their worst, Body Futures play frazzled, over-complicated rock that is less memorable than No Doubt. Brand New Silhouettes starts out strong, but takes an all too soon turn to forgettable late ‘90s radio fodder. If it was a record full of “Hooks and Eyes,” I’d be a fan. Unfortunately, I’m going to have to take a hard pass.  –Matt Seward (Latest Flame, latestflame.com)


BODYFATHER:
Self-titled: Cassette
So, the ‘90s have made a comeback. I suppose there are worse things that could happen. Bodyfather fit in well with all of the other ‘90s comeback companion pieces. This release could hold its own among some of the mid-’90s noisy Dischord Records band like Hoover, The Crownhate Ruin, and Fugazi. It’s done really well and anyone who is into that kind of stuff would likely really like this. There are six songs here with not a single dud in the bunch.  –Mark Twistworthy (Muck Man)


BOILERMAN:
Demo: Cassette
What is it about Chicago and excellent pop punk? Screeching Weasel, Smoking Popes… and now Boilerman. They play fast and gritty with catchy little guitar leads and no snot, just sincerity. The raw recording puts the detonating guitars up front and makes the already dynamic songs kick all the more ass. Five songs, summed up by these lyrics: “All I want’s to be productive/But what is there to do?” –CT Terry (boilerxman@gmail.com)


BOILERMAN:
Bright Young Things: 7”
Zippy, poppy punk with some very nice guitar fills. Tunes are short, hook-laden, and more late-‘80s than late-‘90s in approach. –Jimmy Alvarado (hipkidrecords.com)


BOILERMAN:
Yield the Ghost: 7” EP
For some reason, the cover hinted at a disc of the hyper-thrashorama variety, but no, things here sound more like a band trying to give early Jawbreaker a hardcore sheen. –Jimmy Alvarado (Cowabunga)


BOILERMAN:
Loss Leaders: LP
Boilerman has a uniqueness in a sound that seems very oversaturated. Playing the style of melody-driven, rough punk which can be pinpointed by bands like Witches With Dicks and the less produced Banner Pilot stuff, Boilerman’s hardcore background is definitely an asset. There’s just more power in the sound. I mean, the bass player is wearing a His Hero Is Gone shirt, and the other two guys were in Cold Shoulder; you know you’re gonna get something good, and this record does not disappoint. Multi-vocalist, trio devastation. Have the drummer do the fills while the guitar plays a lead, and the bass just never stops! There’s an intensity that rages through the whole record. Can the intensity be traced back to straight edge? Who knows? But I do know that these guys are drawing from something that a lot of people playing this style of music don’t have, and it’s making for some awesome music. Free Gym Guys! –Daryl Gussin (Self-released)


BOILING OVER:
Trash City: EP
If this record would have come out during the early 2000s, I bet Boiling Over would really have raised some eyebrows in their native Chicago. Unfortunately, we’re well into a whole new decade and hardcore isn’t quite the same. Even by the bare minimum standards of “at least it’s fast” hardcore, this is pretty basic and unoriginal. Side B of this record is a tad angrier and faster than side A and, during its best moments, brings to mind Tear It Up and Down In Flames. The live action shot on the back of the cover suggests that these guys are quite possibly sincere, fun-loving guys who don’t take themselves too seriously. Then again, there’s also three X’s on the bottom left hand corner. –Juan Espinosa (Lifeline)


BOILING POINT:
Self-titled: 7”
Riffy, speedy Slovakian hardcore. Fans of 625 Thrashcore’s catalog will enjoy this one. Buzzsaw guitars and ripping drums with vocals shouted in English. The record begins on a serious note (“Disillusioned”), tackling the state of the band’s homeland: “It’s been more than twenty years since the socialism fell. New regime blessed the highest class while the poorest people live in hell.” That second part seems sadly familiar here in the so-called oldest democracy in the world… But most good music needs balance, and these guys do that with a humorous tip of the hat to us record collectors on “Wax”: “Touch the plastic, sniff the cover. Diagnosis: vinyl lover!” Ha! Excellent seven-song debut with fantastic packaging.  –Chad Williams (Analog Freaks, contact@analogfreaks.net, analogfreaks.net)


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