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· 1:Razorcake #79 Now Available
· 2:#307 with Mitch Clem
· 3:L.A. Zine Fest 2014 by Andy Garcia
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· 5:Record Reviews in Razorcake #79


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Razorcake #79
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Record Reviews

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BOBBY AND THE SOFT SPOTS / BABY DINOSAURS VS.:
Split: 7"
Two Atlanta bands on this split single from the generally solid Rob’s House Records. Baby Dinosaurs have kind of a power poppy/girl group sound with a song called “Coke Dick.” Bobby And The Soft Spots are vaguely noisy and vaguely poppy with a lo-fi production. Fans of the majority of HoZac or Big Neck Records releases will wanna check this out. –Mike Frame (Rob’s House)


BOBBY BARE JR’S YOUNG CRIMINALS’ STARVATION LEAGUE:
From the End of Your Leash: CD
Seems to me like an orchestral alt-country Flaming Lips. I probably got that wrong, but who cares? Bobby Bare Sr? Mister Peanut? Hotdog Teade? Hotdog Teade! –Cuss Baxter (Bloodshot)


BOBBY JO EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS:
F: CD
A new release here from one of the Bay Area’s more notorious groups active during the ‘90s. What you get for your green are smart, topical tunes that fall well within the confines of “alternative rock,” but touch upon a number of stylistic genres—a little country here, a dash o’ punk, a dabble of ‘50s rock—outside that pigeonhole and aren’t afraid to punctuate their points with some humor, resulting in a more colorful and creative palette than one usually runs into. –Jimmy Alvarado (silversprocket.net)


BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGETS / KREAMY ‘LECTRIC SANTA:
Split:: 7”
Nice to finally hear these two bands, both of which I’d read about in fanzines (the latter in The Artist Formerly Known as Iggy’s Scam, and the former in Matt Thompson’s Fluke). I think the juxtaposition works well, as both of these bands are very much on their own trips. Kreamy ‘Lectric Santa’s side of the split features an electronic cover of what is apparently a Trash Monkeys song, as well as the real deal: wacko art splatter with dual fe/male vox and disorienting time and tempo changes. Think Tragic Mulatto and you’re on the right track. Bobby Joe Ebola And The Children MacNuggets rely on tongues planted firmly in cheeks, not entirely unlike Black Randy, as they attempt to bring their pointed political commentary to the norms with straight faces and straighter singing and instrumentation on their original “The Poor.” A cover of a Tom Lehrer song rounds things off. This split is awesome, in that it makes me wanna seek out additional stuff from both bands. Bravo! –Michael T. Fournier (Mayfield’s All Killer No Filler)


BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS :
F: LP
Kind of like a They Might Be Giants of Bay Area pop punk. At its core, two dudes who push themselves to crank out some great songs, with the help of an assortment of other local musicians. Musically speaking, it toes the line between folk and pop punk just enough to keep things interesting, but without making you say, “Ugh, what are they doing now?” Lyrically, there is a lot of “anti”—lots of snarky stuff that I tend to associate with the East Bay for whatever reason—and when you combine all of that together, it makes for a neat, unique record. –Joe Evans III –Joe Evans III (Silver Sprocket)


BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS:
¡Carmelita Sings!: Visions of a Rock Apocalypse: CD
Well, it’s certainly wacky. I think I can say that right off the bat. John Geek of the Fleshies and other Geekfest-associatedBay Area musicians make up this band that also seems to be partly comedy troupe. There are elements that remind me of Jello Biafra and his various musical endeavors—flamboyant, theatrical vocals, extensive liner noting, and collage art. And like Dead Kennedys and Jello’s solo work, lyrics are humorous with political and social commentary. The main difference is that whereas Dead Kennedys were a band that wrote songs that were also funny, these songs seem like they were meant to be funny first and songs secondly. Personally, I think this makes both the humor and music suffer and what you wind up with is more of a punk rock Ray Stevens, as a lot of the jokes come across as strained and dated. This is probably a great musical artifact for the people who experienced this firsthand and got to be a part of the Geekfest scene but I can’t see myself reaching to put this one on again. –Jeff Proctor (Silver Sprocket)


BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS:
BOBBY Trainwreck to Narnia: CD
By now you probably know if you like the comedy punk antics of Bobby Joe Ebola. As was the problem with much of Ebola’s prior work, the lyrics are hysterical, but the songs vary in catchiness. The Dead Milkmen and Hard Skin are examples of comedy punk that works both musically and on a comedic level. A lot of the time, Bobby Joe Ebola succeeds on both planes, too. Some of these songs are so laugh-out-loud funny that it’s hard to fault the corny back up music. “Cop Kisser,” a goofy take on the Body Count classic “Cop Killer,” is probably the best track. Lighten up and give this goofy shit a chance. –Art Ettinger (Rooftop Comedy, rooftopcomedy.com)


BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS:
Trainwreck to Narnia: LP
I don’t like it. I feel as though this would have been right up my alley in the past. (Hell, I probably would have loved this record when I was twelve.) It’s not that the musical style, a strange folk/show tunes/rock combination, is too out of bounds for me, or the humor is too dirty for my taste, but I didn’t find it funny. Do I have a sense of humor? Evidence suggests that if one is there, it is minimal at best. The jokes just didn’t land for me, but I’m not a comedy reviewer, I’m a music reviewer. As such, based almost purely on the music, I don’t like it. The songs by themselves aren’t good enough to carry the humor of the lyrics. If these were just good songs, I don’t think I would ever care that being humorous is its first priority, but as it stands… well, I feel I’ve made my feelings pretty clear. –Bryan Static (Dirt Cult, dirtcultrecords.com)


BOBBY JOEL EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS:
Carmelita Sings!: Visions of a Rock Apocalypse: CD
This is a reissue with a few extra tracks from when the album came out from a few years ago. This is basically vaguely folky punk like the Dead Milkmen, but with some more theatrical vocals. This is actually pretty catchy, but in a way that I don’t really like. This album tends to bring to mind what would happen if one of those guys who writes silly songs to play at preschools and after school programs decided to put together a band and shoot for a more mature audience of thirteen- to seventeen-year-olds. Also, at thirty-two tracks this is just too long, because by track six or seven, the jokes just start wearing thin. I’m not down on goofy songs, because bands like the Dickies, The Hanson Brothers, and The Briefs can pull them off magnificently. –Adrian (Thrillhouse)


BOBBY SOX:
Scavenger of Death b/w Hate in the ‘80s: 7”
This is a “fanclub release” (nudge, nudge, wink, wink) of a super-obscuro, collectors-go-crazy-for ‘79 Dallas band. It’s wonderfully shitty. The production’s pretty much ass and the drum sounds just a little better than a sponge getting thwocked. Yet, despite the audial limitations, the band mined similar fields as the Necros at one-half speed (a little metally, a little gruff) while tweaking one of Devo’s nipples (creative repetition and drone), so it’s nice and deranged and completely out of left field – which I pretty much figure how they were regarded as, now as well as then: a small band of aliens in the middle of big, fucking prairie that most people would want to shoot and a small band of people who love the hell out of ‘em, just for trying and making their lives a wee more interesting. –Todd Taylor (www.stickmenwithrayguns.com)


BOBBY SOX:
Scavenger of Death b/w Hate in the : 7"
This is a “fanclub release” (nudge, nudge, wink, wink) of a super-obscuro, collectors-go-crazy-for ‘79 Dallas band. It’s wonderfully shitty. The production’s pretty much ass and the drum sounds just a little better than a sponge getting thwocked. Yet, despite the audial limitations, the band mined similar fields as the Necros at one-half speed (a little metally, a little gruff) while tweaking one of Devo’s nipples (creative repetition and drone), so it’s nice and deranged and completely out of left field – which I pretty much figure how they were regarded as, now as well as then: a small band of aliens in the middle of big, fucking prairie that most people would want to shoot and a small band of people who love the hell out of ‘em, just for trying and making their lives a wee more interesting. –Todd Taylor (www.stickmenwithrayguns.com)


BOBBYTEENS, THE:
Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’: CD
Boy, Maddy’s gonna be mad at me for not passing this CD along to her. It’s Lucky Charms, all the way. Female-fronted pop punk in the vein of Nikki and the Corvettes and, well, shit, all the bands that have tried to be the Bobbyteens. This is what the Donnas would sound like if they had any talent. This is what a generation of leather-jacketed tough punk rock girls have wanted to sound like, and with good reason. It’s definitely worth picking up.  –Guest Contributor (Estrus)


BOBBYTEENS, THE:
Back in the Saddle: Cassette
The Bobbyteens are the queens of snotty punk and roll and here you get a twenty-seven song sampler on one affordable cassette. This collection pulls songs from 7”s, comps and includes big chunks of their full-length albums. “Gonna Get Down” and “Baby Doll” deserve punk classic status. Essential. This tape is the perfect accessory if you plan to chew gum, lean on a jukebox, or steal a Datsun. –Billups Allen (Burger)


BOBOT ADRENALINE:
Dumb Bomb: CD
This is another solid effort from L.A.’s punkabilly trio. It’s stuffed to the gills with rockabilly riffs, gang choruses, and armchair politicking. Confronting militarism, war, and poverty, Bobot is the very articulate mouthpiece for the disenfranchised. While The Clash influences bleed through in “East of the Docks” and “Blast,” where the latter’s guitar structures are pretty close to “London Calling,” Bobot is not content to mimic. Striking a balance between melodic sway and roiling drums, I think this is their best work yet. If you’re in the L.A. area, check ‘em out. Recommended. –Kristen K (Basement)


BOBSLEIGH BABY:
Self-titled: CD
Wow. This Italian garage album is a very striking, energetic debut from a young garage-folk-punk band from Rome, Italy. Reminiscent of the Violent Femmes, but with dual male/female vocals and with raw, lo-fi production, Bobsleigh Baby is a winner. The lyrics are sung in heavily accented English, with a haunting quality to them. The drums are uncommonly high in the mix, adding to the punch. They self-describe as post-punk, but I’m failing to see the post part. Unless the post part is post-dated. –Art Ettinger –Todd Taylor (Jeetkune, jeetkunerecords.blogspot.com))


BODIES LAY BROKEN:
Discursive Decomposing Disquisitions of Moldered Malapropisms and Sedulous Solec: CD
I was shocked into silence by this. I mean, I knew full well that I was going to hate it, but DAMN! Seriously guys, twenty-three of twenty-seven songs are Latin names for diseases of one sort or another (but I’m glad you threw “Chudbot” in there for good measure!). The music? Well let’s just say that it’s grindcore of the most nonsensical degree. The vocals sound like a combination of the spit suction at the dentist and trying to hock up that elusive loogie that has been irritating your throat for the last half an hour. Granted, I might not be the right person to review this, but I am the right one to point out that if these guys had put as much effort into the English on the disc as the Latin, the spine might not have read “Bodies Lay Borken.” Painful. –Ty Stranglehold (One Percent)


BODIES LAY BROKEN:
Eximenious Execration of Exiguous Exequies: CD
Ah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha. I love this: twenty-seven short blasts of Carcass-worshipping goregrind. With song titles like “Embrocate Indiscutient Hirudinea Poultice” and “Acedic Intransigent Bougienale Hordeolum,” I’m sure you can imagine what this sounds like. I wonder, when this band plays live, how do they write their set lists? It obviously takes longer to write out and correctly spell the song titles than it does to play (and probably even write) the songs, but it’s all a part of the charm of this. Not something I’d actually ever listen to, but it’s great to pull out one night while drinking with friends to play for a few minutes and laugh at the song titles. –ben (Deathvomit)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: LP
I was excited about getting this, because I know that some of my Razorcake cohorts love this band. I hate to say this, but I was really disappointed. For some reason, I expected these guys to sound tougher. While I wouldn’t call this pop punk, it’s definitely too poppy for my tastes. The singer’s voice doesn’t have a hint of rasp in it, which is usually the element that can save a band like this for me. The music never strives for more than the basic three-chords-and-an-attitude vibe, except there’s no attitude. This isn’t horrible, but it just lacks power and spark. To make matters worse, there is no lyric sheet and no information about the band or label. –Dan Yemin (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: CD
It seems appropriate to mention, while reviewing a recording by a band called “The Bodies,” just how much the act of reviewing music is like conducting an autopsy—an autopsy on something that’s not dead yet. As the philosopher Christmas Humphrey once said (and I’m going purely on memory here, so I’m paraphrasing) “once something has been successfully defined, it has been successfully killed.” That being the case, I’m going to gallantly serve up a review of this re-packaging of the Bodies’ first record (plus bonus tracks) which will be rife with utterly inadequate descriptions of the music contained therein. All so you—the punk music epicureans—can enjoy the lively melodic pop punk sounds of this recording without the unsightly scar tissue of my having poked and prodded around getting in the way. So here goes: edgy, fun, neurotic, happy music played with guitars to a punk rock beat. There. Now forget I said any of that and go buy the disc. –aphid (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Addicted to You: CD
This is, what, the third time I’ve reviewed these songs? No matter, for there are worse ways to while the time away. Gotta hand it to these guys; they’ve put out some mighty fine listening and this is easily the cream of the crop, a veritable Cock Sparrer-via-the-Damned orgy of driving beats and great hooks. Years have passed since I first perused this cornucopia of sonic bliss and it still manages to, once again, make it into heavy rotation. For the third time in a row, this comes highly recommended. –Jimmy Alvarado (Radio)


BODIES, THE:
Firepower Is Our Business: CDEP
The Bodies are as catchy as they sound mean. They’re working class. And, thankfully, they don’t oi it up, since they’re from America. They just look like regular dudes – jeans and t-shirts. And they rock out. And they drink a lot when they play, which is endearing. What’s disarming is that Abe’s voice could easily be on a pop punk album. It’s very smooth, very easy to listen to, and he does this thing called enunciation instead of gargling marbles in a Cockney-affected accent. It’s refreshing. The band plays flawless, powerful punk rock, and although they’re from the bombing range around San Francisco, they sound like the very best of true Orange County punk. Slicing wire guitars, punished drums, bubbling bass melodies, and a solo-less experience. And although I essentially disagree with their supporting of the death penalty (but take their point that scumbags should get their due) and don’t quite share wanting to wave the flag with them, I can’t but help cranking the stereo and singing along. The music’s just too good to dismiss on small points of political disagreement, especially since the times I’ve seen them play, they’ve been really nice guys. (I think most of these songs were previously released on both Vulture Rock and Radio, sans the last track, but I’ve been known to fuck up.) –Todd Taylor (TKO)


BODIES, THE:
3Brandnewsongs: 7"
I often sit and wonder what would have happened to the Bouncing Souls if they didn't start treading water in the songwriting department a couple years back. Abe's voice reminds me of 'em. I wonder what would happen if the Crowd got into a time warp dealie and were transmigrated to Northern Califonia in the '00s. Then rubbed raw against concrete. I no longer have to wonder. When I saw these guys, they were so fucked up, I really think they were all playing a different song at the same time for about a minute, then they gave up. Such endearing behavior always puts a check mark and smiley face near your name in my book. I bet, to woo the ladies, they line up all the chunks from their puke and spell out the girl's name before falling back into the splooge. Three short, effective, and catchy splashes in bright green vinyl. Hostage Records' only non-SoCal band. Good stuff. –Todd Taylor (Hostage)


BODIES, THE:
Angel on the Nine: 7”
Seriously, how long have The Bodies been promising a new 7”? Eight years or so, I think. I never thought the day would come, but here it is in my hands. I’ll tell you this: It would be easy to think that these two songs were recorded way back whenever they released something last. They sound exactly like they did a decade ago. The good news is that is the BEST THING EVER! I love The Bodies so much! The bass-driven songs that bounce around in your skull for weeks at a time and you don’t get mad about it. Abe’s vocals jumping all over it, rattling with precision. The shout-back choruses... THE BODIES ARE BACK! Now let’s have an LP, preferably before I start collecting my old age pension. –Ty Stranglehold (Modern Action)


BODIES, THE:
“Angel on the Nine” b/w “Open Your Eyes”: 7”

The past ten years have been unpredictable. No longer is TKO at the top of the heap of American street punk and oi. Duane Peters isn’t releasing a new record every six months. The Reducers SF haven’t been heard of for a long time, either have the Anti-Heroes. Hostage Records is woefully missed. And in the middle of it all, The Bodies somehow manage to exist like slow-moving glaciers. Never the fastest on the trigger on a release date, these guys from Sonoma have become synonymous with no-nonsense, American-made, full-throttle punk (street or otherwise). To those who’ve never heard them, there’s more than a passing blush to the tightest, toughest Bouncing Souls. To those that are familiar with their output, these two songs are right down the Bodies well-constructed, almost seamless alley.

–Todd Taylor (Modern Action, modernarctionrecords.com)


BODIES, THE: Angel on the Nine: 7” single:
Angel on the Nine: 7” single
Had no idea this band was still functioning. The last time I had seen them was at Headline Records with the Trust Fund Babies around 1998/1999. Two new songs of punk rock that reminds me of a rawer Stitches. Despite being from Sonoma, I hear a big OrangeCounty influence in their sound. It’s tuneful, catchy, fast, and clean. “Open Your Eyes” is the faster of the two, and the one I listen to the most. “Angel on the Nine” is a bit more poppier, and, in a way, it holds the song back. Not a bad song, but when paired with what’s on the B side, it doesn’t have as much heat. –Matt Average ((Modern Action)


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