Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:Featured Record Reviews From Issue #81
· 2:#327 with Kurt Morris
· 3:Punk Parenthood for the Sleep Deprived
· 4:#328 with Bianca Barragan and Simon Sotelo
· 5:Creepy Emphera #1: Cadaver Synod


Subscriptions
New Subscriptions
Renewal
Stickers and Buttons
The NEW "Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Hurula, Vi ar manniskorna vara foraldrar varnade oss for LP
Razorcake #81
Razorcake Ouija Slip Mat
Nights and Days in a Dark Carnival by Craven Rock
Chantey Hook, Underground 7" *Limited Color Vinyl


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

Imprint Indie Printing

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

< Prev Section | Next Section >

RSS Feed

ADAM WIDENER:
Cola Kids Hanging Out in the Bubble Dome: 7”EP
Pogo much? This is skinny ties and horn rimmed glasses kinda music. Out of San Francisco, Adam’s four pop punk tracks with snappy melodies and tight 4/4 rhythm maintain a continuous playlist of bounce-happy jams. Easy to sing along to, “CC.MM.YY.KK”, and the title track are a fine mock up of Buzzcocks meets The Kinks. Inventive garage riffs and harmonies make this a stand out in this genre. If you’re in need of a little sunshine in these winter months, pick this up. Recommended. –Kristen K (Big Action, bigactionrecords.net)


ADAM WIDENER:
Make Out!: 7”
Five songs of extra catchy garage pop, a bit like the early (pre-BYO) output of the Clorox Girls crossed with Joe Jackson’s power pop and skinny tie years. Instantly enjoyable, Mr. Widener has written some incredibly fun, stellar pop gems and, impressively, provides for all of the instrumentation on the record by himself.  –Jeff Proctor (Fuzz City)


ADAM WIDENER:
Vesuvio Nights: LP
Every song sounds the same, which is like shit. Dude’s voice is drowned in reverb, and some shitty, spooky Johnny-cum-lately weak ass garage backing it up. The fact that this is a solo project leads me to believe that this guy is just an annoying as his music.  –Vincent Battilana (Speakertree)


ADAMANTIUM:
When It Rains, It Pours: CD
Imagine Pantera’s vocalist singing to the slow parts of a Slayer song. –Jimmy Alvarado (Indecision, PO Box 5781, Huntington Beach, CA 92815)


ADAMS AND EVES:
Dear Professor: LP
Adams and Eves is a family affair that plays lush, exquisitely arranged indie folk/indie pop. The band is made up of frequent Red Pony Clock collaborator Adam Powell—who writes, sings, and adds melodica and saw to the mix—as well as his wife Chelsea who plays bass, and his sister Laura who plays accordion. Adam and Chelsea are joined by another couple in the band; husband David Lee on drums and banjo and wife Megan Lee on vibraphone and glockenspiel, the two of them showcasing a fantastic interplay of the banjo and vibraphone, extracting great emotional depth from their instruments rather than being employed for novelty. Adam’s voice brings to mind that of John K. Samson’s in the Weakerthans and the songs here, generally speaking, share the Weakerthans qualify of being folk music that is earnest without being pretentious and without subscribing to genre limitations. The songs accomplish the feat of being immediately accessible, due to the great song writing and production, and then challenging as well, to both the folk and pop worlds. It’s a lovely record and worth seeking out.
–Jeff Proctor (adamsandeves.com)


ADAMS DAGGER:
The Ripper: 7"
Straight-ahead punk rock with an ‘80s OC feel to it—tempos not aiming for a land speed record, lyrics sung more than shouted, tongue-in-cheek subject matter. When all’s said and done here, they do the job nicely. I’m sure the Babylonian Brotherhood will approve. –Jimmy Alvarado (Durty Mick)


ADAM’S DAGGER:
Self-titled: CD
Holy shit, guys. The ‘80s were thirty years ago! Can you believe that? Well, Adam’s Dagger can’t, because I’m not sure if they’ve ever heard a record released past 1984. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though, because Adam’s Dagger is actually pretty decent. There are a few odd choices in song writing here and there, but this is not a bad record. I think when my biggest gripe about the release is the cover art (another The Black Album cover? Really?) then the band must be doing something right. –Bryan Static (Durty Mick, durtymickrecords.com)


ADAPTIVE REACTION:
Terminal Hate: 7”
Fairly solid synth punk in the vein of Nervous Gender. Not grabbing me like some of their contemporaries—Nervous Patterns for example—but I am digging the female backing vocals and energy. One thing’s for certain: I doubt anyone can question Adaptive Reaction’s commitment. This 45 came in a hand-folded sleeve; the record is on colored vinyl and is hand numbered. Fuckin’ awesome. –Ryan Leach (Conduktiv Produkt)


ADAPTIVE REACTION:
Scream the First Few Bars and Family Entertainment: 7” EP, CD
Weird mix here of punk, goth (?), synth rock, and maybe a little psychedelic rock. At times they sound like an almost punkier Chrome, especially on “Suffragette,” but too often the results sound like they land just shy of the sweet spot, especially when the male vocalist’s growl takes center stage. Family Entertainment collects the four tracks from the EP with those from two other EPs, plus some unreleased ditties, some of which have a sort of drum-machine-techno-punk hybrid to the mix of styles. –Jimmy Alvarado (Adaptive Reaction)


ADD-C/GIANT BAGS OF WEED:
Split: 7”
I picked this 7” up because the name ADD(insert lightening bolt)C cracked me up. A couple of spins showed me that these guys are more than just a silly name. Giant Bags of Weed play catchy songs that would fall into the pits of pop punk if it wasn’t so sloppy and dirty. As it stands, their lack of polish save them. All four songs are upbeat and a little angry and a lot of fun to listen to. God, I love a crappy four-track recording. ADD-C come through with a lot of trash and fuzz, too, but they’re less poppy. It’s pretty heartfelt punk rock, not unlike The Thumbs (and, if you know what a fan of The Thumbs I am, you know what a big compliment this is). I was expecting something silly and half-ass, and this record actually impressed the shit out of me. –Sean Carswell (Half-Day)


ADD/C:
Busy Days: LP
On its best days, DIY punk is a joyous reaffirmation that there is something worth fighting for in our day-to-day lives, no matter how big and sloppy the shit sandwich we’re constantly served is. ADD/C has created an existential—as in, why do we exist? What we do today is more important than yesterday or tomorrow—and soulful record. I’ve enjoyed past ADD/C records, but Busy Days has than earnest, honest ache for communication that doesn’t come around all that often. It has many of the earmarks of contemporary Chattanooga DIY punk—gruff, but clear and sung vocals, excellent-but-not-pro-dude tech playing—in line, but clearly far from aping The Hidden Spots, The Jack Palance Band, and The Future Virgins. I know so very little about what records will stick close to others record players for the long haul, but I see Busy Days’s chances pretty good that it’s going to keep company with Bent Outta Shape’s Stray Dog Town and The Tim Version’s Decline of the Southern Gentleman in my household.The record comes beautifully packaged with a full-sized zine lyric sheet and great artwork throughout. –Todd Taylor (Mauled By Tigers, mauledbytigers.com; Plan-It-X South)


ADD/C / LANDLORD:
Split : 7”
ADD/C are one of those bands that I would have killed to be hip to when I was just getting into DIY punk. Two rough’n’tumble, sloppy-yet-sturdy punk songs that reek of wide-eyed nights and blurry mornings. So pissed, so catchy. You gotta love good punk that’s played by dudes who look like they work at a gas station. On the other side, Landlord contribute three stripped-down tunes; kinda college rock, but on the punker side of the spectrum. Solid stuff, but the vocals remind me a little too much of that schmub from Bright Eyes. –Daryl Gussin (Plan-It-X South)


ADELIT@S:
No Hay Descanso: LP
Interesting mix of street-level Mexican music and anarcho-hardcore from a band hailing Portland, Oregon. The songs bounce back and forth (sometimes even within the same song) between almost folky bits vaguely influenced by huapangos and rancheras to blazing thrash. Nice hand-screened cover with lyrics (including translations for the Castellano-challenged), too. –Jimmy Alvarado (Tomorrow Belongs to Us, punkisaghetto@gmail.com)


ADEM:
Apocalypsongs: CD
Adem plays singer-songwriter stuff accompanied only by a guitar. As a writer myself, lyric-driven songs are my favorite kind of music, but I just didn’t connect with his songwriting or delivery. Though it didn’t click with me, I can respect it for what it is. That’s not my complaint. It’s the packaging I have a problem with. It just comes off as overwhelming and pretentious. It’s two CDs long, and part two (the second CD) is titled: “Infinite to Extinct” and is a five-part, five-track suite. As soon as you know that all you’re getting is a dude singing over his guitar, you realize what a self-indulgent plod you’re getting into. This guy’s really not bad, but a little restraint goes a long way. –Craven (Intense Human Victories, contact@intensehumanvictories.com)


ADICTS:
Fifth Overture: CD
Egads! A re-issue of the Adicts fifth album, and it appears that the ‘80s hit the boys mighty hard. Synths, that ‘80s pop band mix, a decidedly tamer sound…. this is pretty scary. As a pop record, it ain’t too shabby, but as a punk-related release, this is pretty danged bad. Jeez, I had no memory of this sounding this tame. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS:
Rise and Shine: CD
Another band from the old days comes up with a new release and this one ain’t so bad. Monkey’s voice sounds different, but the music’s still the same anthemic punk rock the Adicts are known for. Only thing is I’d swear that the version of “Falling in Love Again” is the same one from way back when. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS:
Twenty-Seven: CD

One of the great things about reissues is that you get a second chance to give a listen to something you totally (and wrongfully) ignored that you shouldn’t have back when it originally came out. Case in point: this album. By 1992, when this came out, I was pretty much ignoring most of what the “old” bands were coming up with, mainly because so much of what they were coming up with sucked ass. ’Tis a pity, too, ’cause, had I not been such a fucking snob, I would’ve stapled this bad boy to my stereo to insure that nothing else would be played. Giving up on the pop road to fame, punk’s favorite droogs went back to doing what they do best, namely writing some great punk rock tunes. There ain’t a bad one in the lot (well, actually, “Give Me More” is a little too “rock” for my taste, but that’s the only one I can muster a gripe about), some of ’em whip by at a breakneck pace by Adicts standards, and damn near all of ’em are prime “classics” material. Fuck, I feel really stupid for missing out the first time round. Thanks for the second chance to redeem myself. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)

 

 

–Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS, THE:
Rise and Shine: CD
This release from the Adicts has some musical gems as well as some songs that are not as precious. The song "Woke up This Morning" is a muffled mess with a garage rock sound and distorted vocals that simply is not pleasing to the ear. However, the next track, "Black Sheep," is a quintessential Adicts song that is fast paced with catchy riffs and lyrics that are easy to sing along to and jump around to like an idiot. The Adicts have been around for over twenty years and on this album they have a song called "We Looked Back," which expresses their appreciation to their fans as they reflect on the time gone by since they have been a band. The song has a Bob Dylan feel with the vocals sung in a strange talking voice. It is not their best song but the message of gratitude is still there. The best song on the album is "Cuppa Tea Song," in which the Englanders express their desire for home and a cup of tea while in America. The song is very simple but it is simply perfect. "Concert Adicto" is also a fabulous song, which is an instrumental piano mix that includes snippets of their songs being played beautifully on the piano in between classical piano measures. Overall, the album is a pleasant addition for fans of the Adicts, but if you are unfamiliar with their music, a different album such as Songs of Praise or Smart Alex would be a wiser choice. –Jenny Moncayo (SOS)


ADICTS, THE:
Twenty-Seven: CD
Here’s a re-release of their first comeback album from 1993. Everyone should know who these guys are. If you don’t, they are an old punk rock band from the UK in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s who dressed like characters from A Clockwork Orange. At the time, it was a fairly original niche in the scene. Over twenty-five years later, I am far less impressed. I mean even KISS took off their makeup when they got old and creepy. I really mean it when I say old and creepy, too. Just take a look at their website. Regardless, this is a pretty standard re-release. Not quite as catchy as the music that made them huge in the early ‘80s, but still catchy pop punk that if you were a fan and don’t already own this, you should pick it up. If you are brave, you could check them out live too, because they are still together and touring with their original line up. –Guest Contributor (SOS)


ADICTS, THE:
Rollercoaster: CD
The Adicts are the longest running punk band with the original lineup in the world. First starting out as Afterbirth and the Pinz in 1975, then changing their names to the Adicts in ‘76, they seemed intent on zagging when the rest of the English punk hordes zigged. Opting for fun, humorous, and ironic songs (a la the Toy Dolls) instead of politics and class war, they were able to carve out a unique smiley face on punk’s back. Their history could easily be a Spinal Tap of punk rock. Early success. They got signed by a major. Got sucked dry. Released a new wave record. Got back on their own two feet, and keep plugging away. Almost thirty years down the road, they release an album of entirely new material. How is it? Okay. Instead of the fire in the belly of their first record, Songs of Praise, it seems that they’re more opting for a living room full of votive candles. The setting’s mostly subdued; the tempos are relaxed. There are even hints of ELO (“Men in Black”) and Lou Reed (“Cheese Tomato Man”). My favorite songs are very close to what the modern day Skulls are hammering out. Sure, the songs are still strange and wacky, but with a little tweak here and there, most of them could be used for Saturday morning cartoons. It isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it’s not exactly tweaking my nipples and making me want to smash parking meters, either. –Todd Taylor (SOS)


ADICTS, THE:
Smart Alex: CD
Album number three for these boys gets re-released with extra tracks, lyrics and liner notes that, among other things, explain why they changed their named to ADX for a short period in the 1980s. The formula remains the same as their previous releases: take punk rock and bash it over the head with pop sensibility and a sense of humor. Standout tracks include the title tracks, “Crazy,” “Bad Boy,” “Tokyo,” “Rockin’ Wrecker” and “The Odd Couple.” Be sure to thank Captain Oi for providing another gem from the old days on which to plunk your green. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS, THE:
Sound of Music: CD
A re-release of this punk rock institution’s second album. Expanding the sound a little, yet continuing down the path begun on their first album, Songs of Praise, Sound of Music is a fine slab of English punk rock, replete with Clockwork Orange imagery, a healthy dose of humor, and some damn fine songwriting. Many of the tracks here are now considered classics, including “Chinese Takeaway,” “Joker in the Pack,” “My Baby Got Run Over By a Steamroller,” and “Shake Rattle Bang Your Head.” Also included are some B-sides, including their take on the Ramones’ “I Wanna Be Sedated.” –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS, THE:
Fifth Overture: CD
Egads! A re-issue of the Adicts fifth album, and it appears that the ‘80s hit the boys mighty hard. Synths, that '80s pop band mix, a decidedly tamer sound…. this is pretty scary. As a pop record, it ain’t too shabby, but as a punk-related release, this is pretty danged bad. Jeez, I had no memory of this sounding this tame. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


ADICTS, THE:
All the Young Droogs: CD
Brand new studio release from these veteran U.K. punkers. Having only recently discovered the awesomeness of the band’s live show (I know, shame on me), I was pleasantly surprised to find out they can still produce in the studio. Fans of early Clash and Cock Sparrer will find lots to love here. But The Adicts absolutely have their own distinctive sound. Luckily “Give It to Me Baby” is not an Offspring cover. Monkey croons in one song—”stop the world I wanna get off.” But I want to hang on for the ride. Viva! –Sean Koepenick (DC Jam,theadicts27@hotmail.com,dcjamrecords.com)


ADIOS MAFIA:
Hot-Blooded American Awesome: CD
Nope. I feel “Nick Marvelous” likes the sound of his own voice. Every moment of every song, no matter how inane or repetitive, is compressed full of lyrics delivered in that over-done Blag Jesus style. This CD would fit easily next to a Drink Fight Fuck compilation you never listen to (or are secretly ashamed of still owning).  –Matt Seward (287, adiosmafia.bandcamp.com)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

< Prev Section | Next Section >

Razorcake Podcast Player



·Razorcake Podcast #232
·SHANKS, THE
·KILL ME TOMORROW
·MASS SHIVERS
·INERTIA!
·ACTIVE SAC
·BAND CALLED PAIN, A
·RAW NERVES
·TEXTBOOK


Razorcake Records



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.