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Razorcake #92
Spokenest, Gone, Gone, Gone LP
Pinned In Place, Ghostwritten By LP
Razorcake #91


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No Idea Records

Record Reviews

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DIRTY NIL, THE:
“Cinnamon” b/w “Guided by Vices”: 7”
This record kind of blindsided me in that it certainly didn’t sound like what I’d expect to be coming out on Fat Wreck. This Canadian band deals more in raucous garage rock/pop than it does in the more standard, melodic punk fare that I’m accustomed to from the label, but I’m guessing it could well be a case of testing the waters as part of a diversification in its roster, much like Epitaph has done over the past decade. Whatever the reason for this choice, I back it one hundred percent. The Dirty Nil manages to grab my attention pretty damn quickly with “Cinnamon”—the musical equivalent of a firework exploding gloriously in my ears—before the wonderfully titled “Guided by Vices” snaps, crackles, and pops more than my favorite breakfast cereal could ever hope to do. This is sheer brilliance.  –Rich Cocksedge (Fat Wreck, fatwreck.com)


DISTRACT / WARRIOR TRIBES:
Split: Cassette
Warrior Tribes play stomping hardcore with some gang vocals scattered throughout, influenced by New York hardcore and oi with some of the gnarlier modern hardcore sounds of bands like Fucked Up. The lead singer’s super masculine vocal would fit well into the aforementioned categories, but lyrics to “Flats” call out entitled meathead behavior and bros who have to start fights to feel strong while at the same time playing up a victim mentality. Good form! With only three songs, Warrior Tribes show much more promise as a lyrically and socio-politically sound band. I’m not into Distract as much, but they put in some pretty solid, politically-relevant hardcore with lots of fast to slow tempo changes. However, both sides suffer from atrocious sound quality; another thing that sucks about the cassette trend is its blurring of the line between a demo and an official release. On that note, let’s just call this a demo, because these are serious slop recordings. Bands to watch, regardless.  –Craven Rock (Self-released) –Craven Rock (Self-released)


DOCTOR AND THE CRIPPENS:
Fired from the Circus: 2 x LP/CD
Once again Boss Tuneage delivers another crucial reissue from the vaults. As always, I wonder how many people give a fuck apart from the couple of hundred who were actually there. This is another record that came out when I was sixteen and completely immersed in the UKHC scene. The Crippens from up North hit a middle ground between the U.K. blurrcore bands and U.S.-influenced bands like the Stupids and Intense Degree. The most notable thing about the band was they used stage props and had an almost lightweight Gwar stage show. This disc has the debut LP that is an absolute stormer as well as their first Peel session, possibly the best thing they did (I think this only because I remember lying in bed listening to the actual session the night before school). As far as I am concerned, Boss Tuneage’s entire retro catalogue is mandatory for anyone with even the slightest interest in the late ‘80s U.K. hardcore scene. For me, it’s much more than a history lesson; it’s part of what made me who I am. Class. –Tim Brooks (Boss Tuneage, bosstuneage.com)


DOCTOR AND THE CRIPPENS:
Fired from the Circus: 2 x LP/CD
Once again, Boss Tuneage raids the archives to bring some 1980s punk rock goodness into the new millennium. This time it’s Doctor And The Crippens, a band best described as being utterly bonkers. With an approach that rarely settled on one method of delivery, this band was capable of taking the same USHC-influenced path that The Stupids trod, mixing it with the occasional Lemmy-like vocal and applying the same ferociousness that helped Discharge define a whole new genre, thus dispensing an enjoyable racket. However, the crowning glories are the lyrics/song titles, which, to this day, have me questioning the sanity of whoever wrote them and which confirm that earlier description. Plus there were exploding cabbages—okay, maybe not on record—but in a live setting this would be one of many unusual effects employed to add a sense of occasion to a Doctor And The Crippens show. This release brings together the band’s first album, a twelve track John Peel Session, and some assorted demos and live recordings. What is noticeable is how the Peel recordings lost some of the raw quality of the album but in its place added a much more powerful sound—this was the case with many bands thrown into far superior surroundings than any had been privy to in the past. For me this release benefits from two versions of my favorite Crippens track, “Freezer,” with the Peel version having a much more melodic quality than one would expect from a band heavily influenced by noisier contemporaries. I would say half of the twenty-three tracks on the album stand the test of time, whereas the Peel Session is worth the price of the album alone. –Rich Cocksedge (Boss Tuneage, bosstuneage.com)


DON’T:
“89” b/w “Dead End Drive”: 7”
Portland four-piece made up of three old dudes and a lady who provides whiny, Bif Naked-esque vocals. Trashy rock’n’roll, but not in an intentional or campy way. Their cover of “Ghost on the Highway” sounds just as shitty as the songs they wrote themselves.  –Alanna Why (Dead Broke, deadbrokerec@gmail.com, deadbrokerekords.com)


DRIP, THE:
A Presentation of Gruesome Poetics: CDEP
These six tracks are blisteringly fast, clocking in at twelve minutes. It’s as though Landmine Marathon had a male vocalist and sped up all their songs. Or perhaps it’s more similar to Magrudergrind. Either way, you get a requisite throat clearing or two, some breakdowns, and a decent range of vocals from Brandon Caldwell—both screaming and growling. It’s all over before you know it, but none of the songs do much to distinguish themselves. It’s a frequent casualty with this sound: a lack of distinctiveness. It makes it hard for me to excitedly recommend this, but I suppose if you’re a big fan of the style (speedy, hardcore grind? fast death metal?) then this’ll do.  –kurt (Relapse)


DUKE DECTER ARMY:
F: Split: 7”
Apparently F is a defunct old Florida punk band of some notoriety. And apparently they regrouped for their half of this split. Seems like kind of a pointless return though, with “two inessential new tracks” (their words), not because they suck but because they’re both rather pedestrian covers songs (Germs and The Seeds). The flipside is a newer band from F guitarist Duke Decter, with yet another cover song (Channel 3) and one lone original, which is pretty goddamn cool and makes me wish all four tunes on this record were originals.  –Chad Williams (Jailhouse, jailhouserecords.com, info@jailhouserecords.com / Foolios, foolios.com, info@foolios.com)


DWARVES:
Invented Rock ‘n’Roll: LP
Like I was saying last issue, 2014 is the year of the Dwarves. This latest full length offering from the undisputed Masters of Mayhem has yet another generation shaking their asses and questioning their morals. You have got to hand it to Blag Dahlia and company. Very few bands can come from the depths of depravity that the Dwarves have mined and survive as a band for thirty-plus years, let alone continue to evolve and actually get better. Punk, hardcore, pop, rock… The Dwarves do it all, and do it all better than most. As far as this record is concerned, I think that it’s the most completely cohesive album they’ve done since The Dwarves Are Young and Good Looking (holy shit, did that really come out twenty years ago?). There isn’t a dud to be found. As usual, the songs are so catchy and beg to be sung along with… You might want to be aware of your surroundings when you’re singing aloud though.  –ty (Recess)


DWARVES:
Invented Rock’n’Roll: Cassette
The Dwarves!!! What I love about the Dwarves is that despite the myriad changes in lineup and sound over the years, their records are always, I mean always, good. They just fucking rock start to finish every single time. How can that be? How can a band be this consistently good and fresh not just over years, but decades?!? I mean, Christ…I got my first Dwarves record in 1990 and a quarter century later they still beat me senseless with every record. The Dwarves brand means quality rock’n’roll, goddammit, and this record lives up to expectations. Of course, these days (i.e., the last four records or so) those expectations consist of songs that alternate between bouncy, melodic, quasi-pop tunes with ultra-underbelly lyrical content and full-on punk rock ragers, along with a few forays into other genres here and there. And this record doesn’t disappoint in that regard either, but it pains me greatly to say that it seems just a wee bit formulaic this time. Oh well. Don’t care. It’s the fucking Dwarves, man! If anything, this record is a bit more heavily weighted on the rager side than the last several releases, and there’s less production value on this record than we’ve gotten used to, so the overall effect is what I imagine would be the sonic equivalent of having my skin taken off with a blowtorch and enjoying it. The Dwarves!!! –The Lord Kveldulfr (Burger / Greedy)


EARWORMS:
Self-titled: LP
I’ve lived a reasonably virtuous life, so the karmic overlords are just gonna hafta cut me some slack for taking this one off midway thru the first side. I just did not want to fucking listen to it anymore. Sounded like a speedmetal version of Rites Of Spring before I pulled the plug. I’m sure this record will make its next owner very happy. I am not that owner. Goodbye. BEST SONG: “Occupy Earth” BEST SONG TITLE: “Bomb Threat Checklist” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: This is challenging, but I’ll say “Did you know the label for the b-side is solid black?”  –norb (Dead Broke, deadbrokerecords.com / Money Fire, moneyfirerecords.com)


ECHOES:
The Pursuit: CD
Musically, this is heavy on the atmospherics—lots of echo, howling feedback, and the like. All well and good until the singer chimes in with guttural hollering that sounds about as fitting with the music as a fluffy meringue pie with bitumen. I’m all for experimentation and playing mix-and-match with different genres, but this is proof that not all such efforts bear edible fruit. –jimmy (Universal Warning, universalwarningrecords.com)


EL CAMINO CAR CRASH:
Routine: 12” EP
From Austria, El Camino Car Crash (ECCC)’s lineup includes former members of Within Walls and Unveil, though, thankfully, their new project is much less mosh-metal sounding than either of those bands. Instead, they draw their sound from ‘90s and early ‘00s hardcore influences. It’s a vein mined heavily by a number of popular current American bands (of which I am not a fan), but ECCC’s sound digs deeper and wider, producing something that sounds more original than their American contemporaries. While it’s possible to recognize ECCC’s influences, they are not a carbon copy of any past band. They get heavy, they get soft—bordering on melodic—but their music always feels uniquely their own. If there’s any place where ECCC feels a tad generic, it’s lyrically. They cover the sort of positive, inspirational themes I would expect from a band on Take It Back, but there was nothing that I found particularly memorable.  –Paul J. Comeau (Take It Back, takeitbackrecords@googlemail.com, elcaminocarcrash@gmx.at)


ESCAPIST, THE:
Self-titled: 7”
How jangly do you like your anarcho punk? The jangleometer reading on this one is pretty high. Not quite in the red, but pretty high. The jangling is an interesting counterpoint to all the talk-yelling about how power corrupts and other punk rock 101 concepts. It gives everything a disjointed feel. This whole affair is a rickety wooden wagon rolling down a hill carrying angry people with megaphones, and it’s pretty wild that the wheels seem to stay on. –mp (escapistfin.bandcamp.com)


ETTES:
Cry on My Shoulder: 7”
For whatever reason, I have not spent a whole lot of time with this band, outside of that LP by the Parting Gifts that a few members did with the illustrious Greg Cartwright a few years back. I have seen probably a dozen releases by The Ettes over the years and just have not ever picked one up. This single, on the fantastic D.C. label Windian Records, is a very cool slice of girl group pop and garage vibe. Both songs are excellent and show that this band has some real songwriting chops. I will have to finally get around to checking out more by this long-running band.  –frame (Windian)


EUREKA CALIFORNIA:
Crunch: LP
Pleasant pop offerings from Happy Happy Birthday To Me are not unusual, and Eureka California (no comma, and from Athens, GA, not Eureka, CA) is no exception. This platter offers eleven fun scrappy pop songs with a punk bent from a two-piece on guitar, vocals, and drums. The songs range from happy, to smartass (see “I Bet You Like Julian Cope,” which uses its title as half the lyrical content), to introspective. The music has variety, but comes together cohesively as a singular piece, and the vocals are a nice snotty whine that has an underlying sense of urgency that give the songs a sense of honesty. EurekaCalifornia might have been more appropriately called SacramentoCalifornia, given the semblance they have to bands from that fair city (that’s a really good thing).  –Vincent Battilana (HHBTM)


EVEN HAND:
Self-titled: LP
Wow, didn’t know that people were still into that late ‘90s Jade Tree/early ‘00s Vagrant sound, let alone bands that wanted to sound like that. Coulda spent the rest of my days not knowing nothing about this stuff and I woulda been just fine. –Vincent Battilana (Mandible, mandiblerecords.com)


EWA BRAUN:
Love Peace Noise: CD
Love Peace Noise was originally released in ‘94. Ewa Braun was an anarcho punk band from Poland who played the sort of mathy post-hardcore that was really popular in the Midwest at the same time. However, these guys are passionate about revolution and sticking it to The Man and won’t be content with the art school banality of bands playing in the same style. There’s a raw quality to Ewa Braun making it almost seem like they came up with this sound independently of the similar things going on in the States.  –Craven Rock (Nikt Nic Nie Wie, nnnw.pl)


EXTENDED SUICIDE:
Self-titled: MLP
Charred, fast hardcore punk from Denmark. They nail the prerequisite speedy blastbeat parts, but are still able to keep in interesting with pummeling slowdowns and feedback-infested intros. This isn’t Ktown HC; Extended Suicide hail from Odense and play a style that would feel more at home on Kangaroo than Hjernespind. Blunt and visceral, this band plays from their guts. When these eight songs are over, you’ll be saying two things to yourself: “Well, that was badass,” and “Holy shit, did I just drink that entire six pack?!”  –Daryl Gussin (Putojefe, putojeferecs@gmail.com)


EXTERNAL MENACE:
Coalition Blues: LP
Scotland’s External Menace were an almost perfect distillation of the best of the whole UK82 head trip—they don’t go for the full-on thrash-o-rama of, say, the Exploited or Disorder, but the same fury that charged those bands is very much in evidence behind most of their repertoire here, as are bits that recall the Partisans, Abrasive Wheels, One Way System, and others. Not that they sound wholly derivative, ‘cause they handily eked their own niche within that well-worn terra, as evidenced on this collection of assorted singles and comp tracks. They swing for the fences throughout, seemingly hell bent that every track that bore their name would be an anthem, and they largely succeed, so much so that one can’t help but wonder why they ain’t on the backs of more jackets. Nice addition to the collection any punk aficionado who manages to pick up one of the five hundred copies floating around. Also includes a bonus 7” with four tracks. –jimmy (Loud Punk)


FAILURES’ UNION:
Tethering: LP
Can I just end this review saying that they name drop both the Gin Blossoms and Goo Goo Dolls? No? (Audible sigh.) This record features of a bunch of songs that sound like they could have been written by ‘90s C-list guitar pop bands, mainly because the band was inspired by ‘90s B-list guitar pop bands. It’s as predictable and dull the first time the late ‘90s rolled around, and I frankly am none too keen to revisit this era in music history. Grade: C-.  –Bryan Static (Dead Broke, deadbrokerecords.com)


FIFTEEN DEAD / POPULATION ZERO:
Split: LP
Fifteen Dead from Scotland crush three tracks of black metal-infused crust. Decent enough, but doesn’t commit enough to either genre for my tastes. I dig both styles, but this is in some middle ground I can’t totally jive with. Population Zero from Philly are way more my speed, playing a more traditional metallic d-beat with some of the most frenzied vocals I’ve heard since the high-pitched bloke in Extreme Noise Terror. Not the most crucial release, but the Population Zero side is worth a listen. –Tim Brooks (Suburban White Trash, suburbanwhitetrashrecords.com)


FLESH LIGHTS:
“No Longer” b/w “You Don’t Know”: 7”
This band is called Flesh Lights. Let’s just get that out of the way. At least three people (or two, if this band runs by majority rule) thought that over, decided it was a good idea, and went for it. Okay. Anyway, what came forth when I threw this record on was not the obnoxious shock rock the name suggested, but some perfectly reasonable, jangly, poppy garage punk. “You Don’t Know” is decent, but “No Longer” clearly deserves its A-side status; it’s as catchy as a cleaned-up Future Virgins single, and there’s this endearingly goofy guitar lead between the verses that I just can’t get over. It’s the kind of thing you might put on in the car with your dad to keep him reasonably happy while you listen to something you’re into.  –Indiana Laub (Twistworthy, twistworthyrecords@gmail.com, twistworthy.com)


FLESH WOUNDS:
Self-titled: LP
One of those records you know is going to be good, just from looking at the cover (this one being a line drawing of a left hand with an eye in the middle, goop, or something of that nature flying off, and then there are these things at the bottom like... I have no clue, but they’re tube-like and dangling there with drops of either blood, or water, or both around them). Sure enough, as soon as the needle glides into the groove some urgent and revved-up punk rock comes blasting out of the speakers. Belligerent, rabid dog style vocals, spitting out the words in rapid fire with slobber all over the mic and surrounding area. Then there’s the vile-sounding guitar scratching out chords and putridity over the bass and drums that sound like they’re hanging on by a thread. I’m liking the insolent attitude of “Kennel Cough,” the wound-up energy of “Smokin’ Crack with Jeff,” and the fact that after listening to “Bushwick Boomerang,” complete with its Dick Dale style surf guitar solo kind of thing in the middle, I go around singing, “Like a boomerang! Like a boomerang!” doing my best impersonation of the vocals, while those around me look at me as though I’m some sort of dipshit. But who cares, this is rock’n’roll babs. So much good stuff on this album. –Matt Average (Snot Releases, snotreleases.com)


FOR SERIOUS THIS TIME:
Weird Life: 12” EP
Ninth Grade me is sitting under the smoker’s tree on lunch break plaintively scratching my favorite bands’ logos into the cover of my AP English notebook. My best, and only, friend is next to me, noodling single note tunes from the unplugged guitar he “borrowed” from the jazz band practice room. I’m pondering why the guy in Joyce Manor has to yell so much and when the new Algernon Cadwallader tape will be out, when my bud asks me if I’ve ever heard For Serious This Time because they’re playing someone’s living room this Friday night. “Oh yeah, man… I’m totally down.”  –Matt Seward (Life On An Island, lifeonanisland.org / Dead Broke, deadbrokerecords.com)


FORN:
The Departure of Consciousness: LP
Forn have one purpose to exist: to create slow, crushing, plodding metal. The songs lumber along with dense walls of distortion arising in their wake. Percussion keeps time and doles out a slow, methodic pummel. The music is pretty good. There are layers upon layers to get lost in. Check out “Gates of the Astral Plane,” with the distortion that rises and hangs in the air, and drums that come and swat it back down to earth here and there. My only complaint is the vocals. Both singers sound like they do nothing but clear their throat with a low and high “rehhhhhh” and “ruhhhhhhh” in place of communicating any sort of message. It’s common for the genre, but after a while it gets tiresome and pretty much pointless. Still, the music is good.  –Matt Average (Vendetta, vendettarecords.wordpress.com)


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