Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:The Rikk Agnew Band, Symbol Six, Barrio Tiger and A Pretty Mess
· 2:Interview with Adam Gnade
· 3:Sign Up for a Razorcake Automatic Payment Plan
· 4:#323 - Future Virgins Edition with Todd Taylor and Mike Faloon
· 5:Burn Burn Burn Interview


Subscriptions
New Subscriptions
Renewal
Stickers and Buttons
The NEW "Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Nights and Days in a Dark Carnival by Craven Rock
Chantey Hook, Underground 7" *Limited Color Vinyl
Chantey Hook, Underground 7"
Razorcake #80
Future Virgins 7" NEW!


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

No Idea Records

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

VOKADIN:
My Fix Before Yours: LP
Clear yellow vinyl LP from a Danish band that sure seems to like Fugazi and The Locust a whole lot. The general vibe here is screamy post punk, but things veer into dance music terrain, early Sub Pop style, and AmRep from time to time. Fans of GSL and Three.One.G record labels will probably find a whole lot to like here. –Mike Frame (Self-released, facebook.com/pages/Vokadin/172645876082425)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
FSDC Volume 2: Cassette
See, my tape deck is broken. It only works half the time and it’s not a part of my stereo in my new place, so listening to tapes is preceded by a fifteen minute ordeal of switching cables around and plugging in speakers on wires that are falling apart. Then it only works half the time and the volume knob does pretty much whatever it wants. So after spending all this time just get any sort of sound out of this tape, I sat back for a minute and thought, “That can’t be right.” I switched some things around and the tape played on. Hmm. “I guess it’s supposed to sound like that.” That phrase kept popping into my head over the duration of the tape, over drum machines, over synth pads clashing with atonal saxophone lines, over fuzzed-out takes on Shadowy Men On A Shadowy Planet. Apparently, all these bands are from the same neighborhood in Indianapolis and I think most of us need to move there before it turns into the next Portland. The bands on this tape don’t really have a whole lot in common stylistically, but they all have this intense insouciance that is so apparent that you can almost hear them laughing at you from the mixing board. I absolute love this because I haven’t heard a compilation in such a long time that actually felt new and fresh like I was hearing a new scene in its infancy. –Ian Wise (Glory Hole, gloryholerecords.com)


VAASKA:
Condenado: EP
More insanely fast hardcore from these guys. I have their Ruido Hasta La Muerta LP, and that is pretty good, but this is way better. The energy is cranked way the hell up and the urgency is undeniable. It’s all about force and volume here. The songs sound like they are being shoved out of the speakers. From the opening squeal of noise in “Hartos” to “Venganza,” it’s non-stop. There are breaks here and there in the songs, where it’s just the bass and drums for a couple seconds, or a big shift in the tempo like “Violencia Criminal,” with the count off at the beginning. Despite the overall catchy nature of the song, it’s about a heavy subject. Great record the whole way through. –Matt Average (Heart First, heartfirst.net)


UNFAIR FIGHT:
We Are All Dead: 7”
I’m sure that brutal was what they were going for, just not in the way I’m using the word. The only thing angrier than this record is my turntable for subjecting it to this… Not my thing. –Ty Stranglehold (facebook.com/Unfairfight)


TOY STORE RIOT:
I’m Gonna Stop You Right There: CD
This self-released CD has five songs of fast-paced and catchy pop punk songs that will get you up and jumping around as soon as the first chorus kicks in. Really well played and produced, with lots of gang vocals, woah-ohs, and the sound of a band having a great time. You also get a couple of bonus songs. One is a commercial and one is about titties that made me laugh at how goofy it is. –Rick Ecker (Self-released, toystoreriot.com)


TOUGH STUFF:
College: 7”
Well. While I like this label a lot, and while Tough Stuff reminds me of quite a few other bands (Shinobu, the Albert Square, maybe Sundials?), the songs here are proficient enough but really don’t pack all that much spark. A handful of mid-tempo songs seemingly stuck between the traditional foundations of indie rock and punk—on paper it seems like it should be phenomenal, but College just doesn’t work all that well. Kinda poppy riffs punctuated by kinda emo guitar lines and lyrics that kinda toe the line between nonsense and a bunch of guys who actually do seem to be trying to navigate their through their college lives. It strikes me thusly: I may in fact just be too old of a dude to get this record. On the other hand, there seems to be a distinct lack of ferocity here, and I don’t necessarily mean sonically—just that little fishhook of energy or emotion, something that’s going to catch me and pull me back, that’s what seems to be missing here. –Keith Rosson (Secret Pennies)


TOM GRRRL:
Even When She’s Losing, She Is Still Winning: CD
If I were a younger man, I might still have long-distance longings, fetishize bottles of wine, desperation, gleeful self-destruction, and candy-ass, poppy indie tunes such as these. I might appreciate the delirious stupidity of the one-dimensional songwriting and hearty, blissful resistance to metaphor or complexity as much as I can appreciate their adorable, lyrical homage to riffs they’ve stolen (“I did a lot of pills in Memphis/I smoked a lot of grass down in New Orleans”). However, as the crustified, walker-rocker that I am, I find it impossible to relate. Nope, Captain Hook here can’t hang, but that does little to inhibit this from being a kick-ass album, nor my ability to recognize it as such. Now you kids stop snickering and get to bed! –Craven Rock (Self-released, jeho.mofo@gmail.com)


TARTAR CONTROL:
Holy Crap!: CD
This two-piece joke band from the Los Angeles area acts like they’re Mormon missionaries (and might have been at one point, for all I know) but this CD is chocked full of so many inside “jokes” and filler that it got old pretty quick. Throw in a song called “Oxygen Is for Fags” and you can count me out. –Kurt Morris (Self-released, tartarcontrolisyourfriend.com)


SWEET TALK:
Pickup Lines: LP
This album contains some well-written power pop with a heavy New York ‘77 influence in the guitar playing. The heavier distortion brings it away from the lighter side of power pop, but the album never quite gets into full-on rockin’ territory. Riding the middle line doesn’t serve the band well, but they make up for it with some strong songwriting. “Talk” and “Put You Right Back” have well constructed choruses with strong back ups. The band is good with choruses overall. It’s a catchy record when it gets rolling. –Billups Allen (12XU)


SPECTRES:
Nothing to Nowhere: LP
I like this much, much better than the song (“Pattern Recognition”) on their split with the Arctic Flowers. On this record, the sound is more dark and gloomy. Even during their mid-tempo, slightly speedy songs, the darkness hangs heavy. Stylistically, the Spectres are a good mix of U.K. post-punk, L.A. death rock, and some Pornography-era Cure, Kaleidoscope-era Siouxsie. The bass figures heavily in the mix, with the guitars providing the atmosphere, and the vocals have a faraway sound. It’s interesting that despite all the dark and gray that this music conjures, I can’t help but get this feeling of hope while listening to it. Maybe that’s because it’s a great album? “Missing Time” has the potential to be a classic. Really, this whole album will hold up and stand the test of time. They’ve really honed their sound down and pulled out the stops on this one. The broody opening to “Return to the Sea” sink its hooks in deep. You have the tribal drumming, the galloping bass, and the guitar underscoring the gloom, all adding depth. I’m kind of all over the place with this review. But this album is great, and I’m pretty stoked on it to where I want to tell everyone around me, “Get this album! Put the other stuff back, and get this one!” –Matt Average (Deranged, derangedyouth@hotmail.com / derangedrecords.com)


SLOW LEARNERS:
Habit: 7”

I love this record. It reminds me of the best parts of some of my favorite ‘80s and ‘90s indie rock bands. Sebadoh, Dinosaur jr. and early Pavement come to mind. My friend Tiemen reminded me that I’d seen them play before but I can’t recall it at all… but to their credit, I do drink a fair bit from time to time. I will make sure not to miss out again.

–Ty Stranglehold (Perfect Master, perfectmasterrecords.com)


SECTOR ZERO:
“Guitar Attack” b/w “Hiding in My Car”: 7”
Two solid punk rock blasts with, as the song title hints at, ludicrously overdriven guitars. The vocals are also overdriven and thick with echo. “Hiding in My Car” is good rock therapy for those who have slept in a car at some point. This is a good slab for fans of full-on, driving punk in the vein of Guitar Wolf. –Billups Allen (Goner)


REVENGE:
Self-titled: CD
There’s a hard rock strain bubbling just under the surface that makes its presence known now and again, which can be disconcerting, but for the most part, this thrashes along in a catchy modern California hardcore-type way (interesting in itself seein’ as far as I’m able to tell, these cats hail from much cooler climes). Totally see this bein’ popular with the baseball hat, jammer shorts and wallet-chain crowd. –Jimmy Alvarado (Gaphals, gaphals.se)


RESISTOLEROS, THE:
Rock ‘n’ Roll Napalm: CD
Just as the title of the album declares, there is rock and or roll to be found here. Really good quality rock’n’roll, in fact. The problem arises in that it is so textbook, influences by the numbers, that it is really hard to tell who The Resistoleros really are. As good as it is, I don’t think it really separates itself from the glut of other bands out there carrying The Stooges or Dead Boys around on their backs like a Johnny Thunders’ sized smack problem. That said, I would probably listen to this before whatever Nashville Pussy or the like are putting out these days. If you are into any of the bands mentioned in this review, I’d say The Resistoleros are worth giving a spin. –Ty Stranglehold (Malt Soda)


RAKEHELL:
Pure Pop Poison: LP
This appears to be some sort of Buddhist-themed band and record. The sides are split into “passionate side” and “political side.” This distinction is decidedly above my head but appears to be quite important to the artist. There is a paean to making love to eight people with Barry White on 8-track on the song “8-Track Love.” The sound of the band and record fluctuates between a rough and ragged Krupted Peasant Farmerz kind of sound and the goofy, twee sound of The Bartlebees or even Beat Happening at times. –Mike Frame (Three Peas)


QUANDO QUANDO:
Self-titled: 7”
Four songs from this Bavarian band that play sloppy punk rock with a dose of melodic post punk. They hit on a winner with songs that have a melody that grabs you and are so damn catchy that you have to listen to the single again. I think that these guys will be on my list of bands to keep an eye on in the future. –Rick Ecker (Ride The Rhino)


PSYATICS, THE:
Oderint Dum Metuant: CD
Swaggering bar rock with a bit of a punk edge to it, resulting in nothing too miserable, but also nothing to write home about. –Jimmy Alvarado (Outhouse Eagle, outhouseeagle.com)


PRANK WAR:
Don’t Blame It on the Rain: Cassette
You could call Prank War pop punk but that would be selling them a bit short, because quite a few influences can be heard here, from the Breeders to The Muffs and, at times, a ‘50s rock sound, but that might be a bit of a reach. The lead singer has a sweet voice and most of the songs seem to be about relationships, be they friendships or lovers, and frequently take on a self-effacing quality. I wouldn’t say Prank War are super solid, yet, but this tape shows them off to a good start. Right now, it’s the kind of music that would be perfect for baking or cleaning, but I don’t really feel the call to listen to it often. –Craven Rock (nowarbutprankwar@gmail.com)


PHANTOM SCARS:
Self-titled: 7”
Sounds like this dirty rock’n’roll was recorded after a failed attempt to rob a liquor store. The ski masks are still on. The adrenaline is still flowing, and despite the disappointment there’s a tinge of optimism. “Shit, I managed to grab a forty, but when that’s gone we got nothing.” “Well, there’s always other liquor stores and the night is still dark.” –MP Johnson (Manglo, manglorrecords.com)


PEEPLE WATCHIN’:
Somethin’ to Tell Ya: LP
The cover album with its crude, ziney drawing of a leather-jacketed punk girl walking in the snow down a dirty city street with a 40 ounce in a bag crooked in her arm, the skyline behind her as she looks at the ground is a familiar image, that of the sentimental suffering that you’ll commonly find in punk, but in underground punk, an image that belongs to what I would call the cultural alchemy of punk, the unexplainable and untenable language that underground punk speaks, but is, nonetheless, very much there, beneath Vans Warped Tours and Henry Rollins’ flexing neck. The songs come from the same place: happy-sounding about bad times, sexual frustration, and loneliness; catchy but with garage dissonance; from the familiar place of damage, both familiar to our own and the collective damage that brought a bunch of misfits together in the first place; perhaps what Patti Smith was talking about when she said, “Those who have suffered understand suffering and thereby extend their hand.” When the lead singer sings “with my brand new pair of shoes and a backpack full of booze, I’m comin’ to tell you I’ve got nothin’ else to lose,” once again, it’s comforting and fun to listen to. But Peeple Watchin’ takes a huge subjective leap. The lead singer has recently, at twenty-seven, come out as a transgendered woman and some of the songs take on a far braver detour. Take, for example, when she sings about feeling she missed her prime, lamenting, “the only thing that’s passing is my youth,” she throws the punks a bone, in a youth movement full of old souls, feeling old is not uncommon and hits pretty hard, but she demands you look at it from her perspective, from the viewpoint of a recently out queer woman, and the bait and switch is staggering. –Craven Rock (nervousnelly.storenvy.com)


PAPER ARMS:
The Smoke Will Clear: CD
Man, this is a real polarizing release for me. At first listen, these guys seem to be doing everything right but something is amiss. First of all, Paper Arms seems just a little too comfortable mining the gold of post-hardcore titans Strike Anywhere, Rise Against, and Hot Water Music to have anything resembling a unique identity. This is literally by-the-buttons post-hardcore. The band/label even went so far as to have Brian McTernan mix the album to make it totally authentic. To be fair, they could have done far worse. I wouldn’t exactly complain if it were playing in my vicinity but I just couldn’t see myself ever listening to this even if it is a fair forgery. In short, this disc makes me think of those label adverts in zines that say “for fans of…”. Likewise, I have always viewed punk bands with suspicion when their CD’s liner notes point out the band’s endorsements. –Garrett Barnwell (Poison City, poisoncityrecords.com)


NOWHERE SQUARES:
Self-titled: Cassette
Quite a beast we have here. It sounds like they’re trying to be They Might Be Giants being a punk band, but with Buzzcocks and Devo influences. It’s really fun at points, but shaky and overly drawn out in a few places. Sometimes the singer does weird things with his voice, with varying effectiveness. My best advice would be to train him a little, make sure it doesn’t pee inside and get it to stop biting people, and maybe there’s a pet inside that thing. As it stands, it’s a little rough around the edges. –Bryan Static (Happenin, dustintimbrook.com/happeninrecords, no address)


MYSTERY DATE:
Dreaming in Black & White: 7”
The power pop revival apparently continues, and this is as fine an example as any of how good it can get. Strong hooks are delivered here with more bite and less saccharine than others plying the same wares, which adds some sense of immediacy to the proceedings and will likely lend it a bit more shelf life when the competition starts to sound more than a little dated. –Jimmy Alvarado (Three Dimensional, facebook.com/threedimensionalrecords)


MUUY BIIEN:
This Is What Your Mind Imagines: LP
Goes from sounding like a skeeter-heinie tight hardcore band ((with wanky intros)) to a higher-fi version of some lo-fi band that might have been on Estrus Records twenty years ago even though they didn’t sing about cars to some peculiar cross between “Delitnu” by JFA and Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music. If there is a market for this sort of thing, they have almost surely cornered it. BEST SONG: “Something Rotten.” BEST SONG TITLE: Kind of a three-way tie between “Emesis I,” “Emesis II” and “Emesis III.” Take THAT, “Damaged I!” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The message “Crisco Party” is etched into the run-off groove, but the song “Crisco Party” by Paul Revere & The Raiders is conspicuous by its absence. –Rev. Norb (HHBTM, hhbtm.com)


MULTIPLE TRUTHS:
No One Wins: LP
“Dude, is that a chick?” I asked myself when the first notes of Mariam Bastani’s searing voice shot through the air. If lumped in with other female-fronted crust bands, Bastani treads the scorched earth between Voetsek’s vicious, slithery vox and the heavier treatment of Nausea’s Amy Miret. This debut out of Chicago defiles your ear drums, building on a thick, melodic backbone and fleshed out with thunderous percussion as evidenced by “Bocas Cosidas,” screamed in Spanish, while “Human Wrath II: Entering the Abyss” kicks off with a crawling instrumental intro like Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs.” Definitely pit worthy. Given time, this quartet will sound more like a well-oiled machine forged in hades, with cleaner key transitions and production. –Kristen K. (Halo Of Flies, halooffliesrcds@hotmail.com / Religious Plague, religiousplague@gmail.com)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player



·ROUGH SEA, THE: : CD-R EP
·TV SUICIDES
·CLEAN GIRLS
·BOOK OF LETTERS #14
·VARIOUS ARTISTS
·SCOTCH GREENS
·MISFITS
·TENNESSEE TEARJERKERS, THE
·JERSEY BEAT #67


Razorcake Records



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.