Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:Webcomic Wednesdays #131
· 2:A Brief History of Punk in Izhevsk, Russia by Alex Herbert
· 3:#362 with Kurt Morris
· 4:Two New Installments in the Tear A Cognita Series
· 5:Featured Zine Reviews From Issue #86


Subscriptions
Renewal
New Subscriptions
Stickers and Buttons
"Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Razorcake #87
Fuck & Fight #7
Submerging Writers
My Dad Went to See Some Weird Music and... by Mike Faloon
Zisk #26


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

Imprint Indie Printing

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

RADAR EYES:
Positive Feedback: 7”
They rein in the schizophrenic surf/shoegaze/alt-rock/whatever experimentation of their full-length here and come across with a couple of straightforward (for them) stompers that are a bit more in-your-face despite the ever-present echo box on the overall production. Both tracks are a wee bit more aggressive than I remember them being prior, but no less good a listen.  –Jimmy Alvarado (HoZac)


PRIMA DONNA:
Living in Sin: 7”
At first glance, this appeared to be a cheesy psychobilly record. Alas, it is just a glam punk wannabe. Despite cries of “1-2-3-4!” and a song called “Rubbish,” it does not fall into the same traps as others of the genre, making it an actually somewhat decent 7”. Scoop one up if you have a pin-up girl tattoo, but avoid if you’re more of an intellectual post-punk.  –Alanna Why (Wanda)


POOKIE AND THE POODLEZ:
The Last Thing I Did As a Teenager: LP
This sounds a lot like Hunx And His Punx. I’m not going to risk looking stupid by telling you if these are the same people or not, because I don’t know. If you think that makes me out of touch, then I’m somehow punker than you because of it. Based on this record, I’m into it. This Pookie And The Poodlez record has snot melody, it’s poorly recorded, and I love that guy’s voice. It’s sarcastic and silly. Plus loads of the songs have that Nobunny attention to classic rock’n’roll with “oohs” and “ahhs” and “babys.” If or not it’s the same people, they’re churning out quality, in my opinion. I’m out of touch with the pedigree of Oakland musicians, but if you like that stuff, you’ll like this. If you don’t, you won’t.  –Billups Allen (POOKIE AND THE POODLEZ)


PLAIN DEALERS, THE:
Self-titled: 7” EP
On the surface, this record has a lot going for it. They’re claiming to be “True Cleveland scum” on the cover. They have song titles like “Born to Die,” and “White Drugs and Girls That Bite,” and a singer that has a nasaly, obnoxious voice. But when you put the record onto the turntable, you’re met with some run-of-the-mill, generic, modern day punk that milks rhythms you’ve heard in a million pop “punk” bro bands, and dreary middle-aged bar punk bands that are stinking up the stages of all punk-frequented dive bars across the land. Is that a bite off of the Sex Pistols I hear at the beginning of “Girls Go Bye,” and at the end of the song? Blehhhh...  –Matt Average (Public Square)


PITY:
The Struggle: 7”
This fucking rules. Confession: I am prejudiced. Every time I pick up a 7” and it contains six songs, and especially if it’s at 45 RPM, I think—no—I know I’m gonna be disappointed. Too many times have I gambled and been burned on a record with a killer cover, rad band name and badass song titles, only to be bored to death by hyper-fast, unintelligible “songs” of noise. This, my friends, is not that. This is punk fucking rock, equal parts The Spits and early X. Raw, aggressive, catchy punk tunes. You’d never guess what “L.J.S.A.” stands for—Leather Jacket Separation Anxiety—but the singer tells me that, and I think I might suffer from that very condition. “Six Pack Breakfast?” Okay!  –Chad Williams (Self-released)


PENNY MACHINE:
Self-titled: Cassette
Caught this band on their West Coast tour. They live up to their hype. Pretty fantastic band, with members of Pang and Cold Beat in their lineup. Sophia’s cutting, snotty, and concise vocals are a dead ringer for Ari Up of the Slits. Penny Machine is a modern day new wave and post-punk blend of a less dancey Delta Five and a punchier version of the Mo-Dettes mixed with a little White Lung. The choppy, distorted, off-kilter post-punk guitar really sets them apart from likely predecessors. Six songs featured on this tape, all super catchy. In fact, the song “Loser” on side B seriously got looped in my brain for like four days. And I liked it.  –Camylle Reynolds (Self-released)


OLDFASHIONED IDEAS:
Don’t Believe a Word They Say: CD
Oldfashsioned Ideas is old fashioned oi! Take it or leave it. They are not breaking new ground here and I’m sure they don’t care. I’m sure that The Last Resort’s Roi Pearce and The Business’s Mickey Fitz would be proud to add this one to the family of albums that follow the simple ethos of “plug in and let’s go” instrumentation and guttural barroom vocals that make up the streetpunk genre. It is loud, proud, and punk to the core.  –John Mule (Contra)


OFFICER DOWN:
Dead Lands: CD
Well, that’s not what I was expecting. In my defense, I don’t think I was out of line to expect something a little more political and hardcore. First of all, the name Officer Down conjures up images of cops getting overthrown by the people (to me anyway), and, secondly, the cover art features a zombie with a flip brim thrash hat and a shotgun in his mouth. Lots of blood splatter. None of which instantly makes me think of mid- to late-’90s Southern California punk à la Strung Out or Death By Stereo. They are very proficient at what they do; I was just thrown for a loop. If you like the bands I mentioned, or that style, you’d definitely be stoked on these guys.  –Ty Stranglehold (TNS)


NV’S, THE:
Trust Fun Suicide: 7”EP
I waited so patiently for something to happen. Anything. The NV’s are perfectly proficient at putting together a decent punk song but it just doesn’t pop. Pretty sure the vocalist can really just tear into it, but she never does and the melodic guitar is skillful, but, again, it’s all played so very safe. So, yeah, I recommend some serious intervention: a bottle of whisky, make it two, then record. Not that alcohol is the perfect elixir; in fact it’s anything but. Just get angry, get stupid, get sloppy, just do something!  –Camylle Reynolds (Big Neck)


NO ANGER CONTROL:
Self-titled: CD-R
This North Carolina-based band kicks down with some straight ahead punk/hardcore. Vocalist Tiffany Badger alternates between in singing and hollering, which is a nice change of pace in typically “either/or” genre, and the rest of the band keep things moving along at a nice clip. The four-track sound quality even lends a bit of mid-’80s demo feel to their efforts. Great live shot on the back cover, too.  –Jimmy Alvarado (No Anger Control)


MUGWUMPS, THE:
Mutation in the Family: CD
With three out of fourteen tracks on this album containing the word “wanna,” I knew what I was in for when it came to The Mugwumps (#1 “Just in Case You Wanna Know,” #9 “Don’t Wanna Know,” and #13 “Do You Wanna Kung Fu”). This three-piece from Austria really know how to nail down the Ramonsey parts where they’re needed and it’s surprisingly more sparing than one might assume. Now I don’t wanna make it sound all bad, but the more I listen to the raspy, breathy vocals over 1, 2, 3, 4 breakdowns, the less I wanna hear this record. Maybe I’m just burnt out on hearing homage records with nothing substantial from these musicians who were born thirty-seven years too late, but this just isn’t a record that I wanna walk around with. But if you’re missing Tommy and the rest, and can’t get enough of this brand, pick up this record. It’s definitely catchy as hell and has incredible Lookout!-inspired artwork by frontman Chris Mug. This record is precisely the mid-tempo pop punk album it set out to be, it’s just not quite for me.  –Kayla Greet (It’s Alive / Monster Zero)


MOOVALYA:
Sixer: CDEP
Oddly, something seems to have eaten the foil off of the CD in parts and has rendered this disc unplayable. Fear not, I’ll just take a listen on their bandcamp site. These guys would have been huge around here in the mid-1990s. They’ve got the Fat Wreck Chords thing of that era down pat. I’m not saying that as a dig at all either. They really do a great job of that particular sound. All in all, pretty enjoyable.  –Ty Stranglehold (MOOVALYA)


MIKEY CLASSIC AND HIS LONESOME SPUR:
Self-titled: CD
This project from a gutter punk who evidently found out about “punk folk blues” reminds me a little bit of what Robbie Huddleston from Ann Beretta was doing with Foundation, but more stripped down with just banjo and acoustic guitar. This isn’t really my kind of thing and all it does is make me want to listen to some of John Mellencamp’s more recent material because I find his vocals much more natural and not as forced. And with twelve songs in forty-one minutes, it’s much too long. Mellencamp also doesn’t have any songs titled “Ya’ll Motherfuckers Need Jesus.” Good grief.  –Kurt Morris (Farmageddon)


MASKED INTRUDER:
M.I.: CD
Oh lookie, the latest from these mysterious, masked panty thieves. I dunno who these miscreants are beneath the multicolored ski masks, but considering this batch of finely honed, barbershop quartet meets Ramones, my money says these guys are the Beach Boys. This would be easy for me to dismiss if they didn’t have such a talent for crafting some of the most dexterous pop punk I have heard in a while.  –Garrett Barnwell (Fat)


MAAILMANLOPPU / KUUDES SILMÄ:
Split: 7” EP
Maailmaniloppu: Tribal post-punk type stuff with barked vocals. Not too terribly intense, but appropriately moody. Kuudes Silma: Death rock with a bit more pep in their step and the melody buried in the guitar work.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Combat Rock Industry)


KP & ME:
EP: CD
KP & Me plays very light, kind of creepy pop songs with dual male/female vocals and keyboard. Formed from the ashes of the better known band Lawnmower!, this is not just some forced-onto-the-audience experiment, but is instead an intricate, interesting set of bizarre songs for anyone into music with a bit of a fear factor. Don’t be scared, though. The only thing to avoid is avoidance. –Art Ettinger (KP & ME)


KENNY KENNY OH OH:
Self-titled: 7”EP
From LeipzigGermany, Kenny Kenny Oh Oh is an all-XX band, sounding like a modern, more savage Kleenex/Liliput with their simple, fast, and super catchy EP. Charming, sharp, snotty German accents, vocals are very Chrissie Hynde a la Pretenders, sung to English lyrics. It was worth several listens before writing this tidbit, not just because I like to be thorough (um, try to), but because I just thought it was awesome. Some might call this riot grrrl, but it’s really just good, straight-forward punk. Gotta own it.  –Camylle Reynolds (Contrazt!)


KENDOLLS, THE:
Diablo Gringo: CD
The Kendolls play some fairly impressive rockin’ hardcore much like Death By Stereo who, ironically enough, I never much cared for. Still, the songwriting is actually quite impressive with plenty of memorable guitar hooks. I sure hope they work a little harder on their album artwork should they decide to keep releasing music. The art for this CD depicts what appears to be a subway train crashing through some buildings and had me expecting some sort of Give ‘Em the Boot band, which could send some listeners running for the hills like Iron Maiden.  –Juan Espinosa (Alleycat)


KAROSHI BOY:
Nothing Is: 7”
For a first 7”, Karoshi Boy, from Corona, California, are unmistakably tight with no glaring hiccups: The vocals are confident (including some slick chorus harmonies), the guitars neatly intermingle, the drums barrel forward, and the bass is never indulgent. This is pop punk in the Joyce Manor vein, nostalgic and concise. I imagine that these dudes will produce a solid full-length in the near future, but I only hope that they experiment some more and deviate from tried-and-true formulas. It’s obvious that they’re talented enough to write songs that stretch further than what’s been trending in Southern California as of late. Solid stuff.  –Sean Arenas (Open Door / Karma Armada)


INSTIGATION, THE:
No Way Out: 7” EP
Catchy Japanese hardcore, modern in sound in all the best ways, with a drive in its undertow that harkens back to previous generations in a way that doesn’t make ‘em sound dated. Singer’s got a twang to his vocal delivery that adds a bit towards this being reminiscent of U.K. contemporaries The Domestics. Not bad.  –Jimmy Alvarado (The Instigation)


INKWIZYCIA:
…Na Wlasne Podobienstwo…: CD
Per the liner notes, this is a reissue of the first record on Nikt Nic Nie Wie. The liner notes also give a synopsis of what the label had to go through in order to make the record, which was rather extensive, given the political realities of the time and place (late ‘80s/early ‘90s Poland and Czechoslovakia). Anyhow, Inkwizycia, which translates into “inquisition” in the lyrics booklet, are pretty good when they are playing fast, but they just can’t do slow very well. The faster stuff is pretty good metal-tinged thrash. The slower stuff varies, from goth rock to lame and tame metal. Unfortunately, the slower stuff pervades the disc, which includes the original album from 1990, plus five songs from a 1997 recording.  –Vincent Battilana (Nikt Nic Nie Wie)


INFLATABLE BEST FRIEND / BONGONYA:
Split: 7” EP
Inflatable Best Friend: Arty, dissonant noise punk. They definitely kick up some dust, but they have the sense to keep things structured so that things don’t get shambolic and jam rock-like. Bongonya: A mix of the same kind of arty, noisy sensibilities as their pals on the other side of the record, but they go the instrumental route, adding a bit more structure and elements of jam rock and maybe a tinge of surf. Somehow that sounds worse than the results actually are.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Don’t Panic)


HOAX HUNTERS:
Comfort and Safety: LP
Think Merge ‘90s-style alt rock with a mix of ‘80s punk Adolescents sound. Thrashy and melodic—it’s punk for sure. It’s got some Mission Of Burma and Dinosaur Jr in there, too. Comfort and Safetyruns the gambit with a diverse range, each song unique from the next, from the clean indie-alt-pop intro “Breathe,” the rock’n drawl of “In the Background,” to the distorted punk punch-n-thrash of “Glitterbomb.” Solid.  –Camylle Reynolds (Negative Fun)


HEALTH PROBLEMS:
Counterproductive: Cassette
You know that school of bands that studied up on their Butthole Surfers and AmRep, with crazy, shirtless singers down in the audience actively fucking with the crowd? So do Health Problems, who I’m guessing have posters for Pissed Jeans hanging on their wall. I’m a huge fan of stuff like this even if there’s nothing new added to the equation, which is not the case here, although the addition is subtraction. There’s no guitar player on Counterproductive, just a bass player who deftly navigates the space between taut leads and fuzzed-out dementia as the drummer makes it sound easy to construct and maintain a heavy, seamless pocket even in the middle of occasional wacko math histrionics. Fantastic stuff.  –Michael T. Fournier (Hanged Man)


HAG FACE:
Rag Face: Cassette
Second EP from all-lady Calgary grunge thrash four piece. Angry, weird, and completely terrifying, Hag Face sound like a heavy-on-the-pedals combination of Bikini Kill, White Lung, and The Soupcans. Closer “Slut Shame” is one of the most intense punk songs I’ve heard this year. I feel really fucking powerful when listening to this. Highly recommended.  –Alanna Why (Self-released)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player



·VEXERS
·Hidden World Live - Day 1
·SCEPTRES, THE
·WHISKEY DAREDEVILS
·LOOKOUT MTN DAREDEVILS
·OFFBEATS
·LOBE
·WHERE IN THE WORLD IS CARMEN SANDIEGO?
·CINCH, THE


Black and Red Eye



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.