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Record Reviews

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FULL OF FANCY:
Sweet Baby Jesus: CD
Did you like the soundtrack to Juno? I hated it. This reminds me of that, with more electricity and pop. I got cavities in all my indie teeth (which I swear I had removed). Pity, because I love the voice that comes out of Miranda (also from Hunchback). –Megan Pants (Whoa Oh)


FULL OF FANCY / SCREAMING FEMALES:
Split: 7”
Full Of Fancy: Two songs. “Gym class” sounds like pitch-perfect Unlovables-style pop punk mixed in with a bit of Measure [SA]. (It makes perfect NJ/NYC geographic sense.) “Notebook” sounds like Soviettes meets Mo Tucker singing the songs of the Velvet Underground, where it’s openly existential (“can’t judge a heart by its lover”) while moving right ahead to its intended target. Fun for both the brain and the feet. Screaming Females: This band shares Miranda with Full Of Fancy. Miranda was in the dearly departed Hunchback and her talents trace nicely onto and flesh out a new skull of music. I’m amazed at how, when she’s involved, that weirdness sounds so fun, so accessible, but it’s still weird. Like fun relatives who aren’t dangerous, but you’re never quite sure what their next present to you is going to be. –Todd Taylor (Let’s Pretend)


ERGS, THE:
That’s It…Bye: 12” EP
For two weeks I disliked this record because it’s reportedly the Ergs’ last. “Resented” is more accurate. I wanted to grow old with the Ergs, take my kids to see them. A three-song EP didn’t seem to be an adequate send off. I wanted something enormous, cumbersome, more than I could handle. Then I realized that the band’s recent thirty-plus song compilation on Dirtnap serves that purpose. That’s It…Bye is the party favor from the wake (Wakes should have party favors!), three more Ergs gems that look back as much as they hint where the band might have gone. Now all three songs are stuck in my head and I find myself overanalyzing them. Does “Hope I run into you one day” (“Anthem for a New Amanda”) refer to a possible reunion down the road? Is “I’m just looking to get home” (“Piltdown Man”) the response? I’ll cut out before slipping into obsessive fan fiction-like obsession, but this is a great record. Thanks, guys. –Mike Faloon (Don Giovanni)


ENERGY:
Race the Sun: 7”
To call this melodic would be an understatement. To call it hardcore would infer it’s hardcore. This sounds like a bad pop punk band trying to cover A.F.I. They cover Bobby Freeman’s “Do You Wanna Dance” in tribute to the Ramones’ 1977 version, but their take doesn’t hold a candle to either. With a lot of people hyping this band, the fact that it’s on Bridge Nine Records, and their show here in Tijuana coming up, I was psyched to get this in the mail. Unfortunately, as soon as the needle hit the clear purple vinyl, it all went downhill. Don’t believe the hype. –Rene Navarro (Bridge Nine)


DOPAMINES / TILL PLAINS:
Split: 7”
Dopamines: The Copyrights have made a crater in the middle of the United States. I’m not saying The Dopamines are stuck in that crater. I’m saying that they’re looking at that crater and going, “Fuck… dude…” looking at the immensity of it. It’s the strange majesty of a big previous penetration. Some people will commemorate it by putting a sticker on their car, signifying that they, too, saw that fuckin’ crater. The Dopamines went into the studio, with the residue of that crater in their minds, and they sat down to write two pretty, simple songs—one of forlorn pop punk and another with that and a dash of folk punk—while not being as weepy, contrived, or as bad as that may sound. I like it. Till Planes: Take this from a dude who’s never written a song in his life. These songs are a little premature, where I can almost hear “what’s next?” a couple of times before there’s a chord change, tempo change, or lyric. There are good bits, and I’m interested what they’ll develop into, but, right now, it feels like I’m sitting in a car with someone who’s learning to drive stick for the first time and they have to pause each time to find the right gear while a medley of early Hot Water Music and At The Drive-In is playing on the stereo. –Todd Taylor (It’s Alive / Soapy Hands)


DOA:
Northern Avenger: CD
On the down side, those who are waiting for Something Better Change Part 2 will be sorely disappointed. On the up side, the ska that marred its predecessor is kept to a minimum and the overall songwriting here is more consistent and now than many of their other releases this decade. Still a wee bit perplexed on why they cover Credence’s “Who’ll Stop the Rain,” but, on the whole, this ain’t as bad as I feared it was gonna be. –Jimmy Alvarado (Sudden Death)


DIRTY DEAD:
Carnivorous Lunar Activities: CD
I have spent a lot of time in the shower singing Misfits songs, trying to get my Danzig impression just right. Still, the hours I’ve put in are nothing compared to what the singer of Dirty Dead has done. One listen to this disc and it’s clear that he never reaches for the towel until his fingertips are wrinkled like raisins and he has sung “Hybrid Moments” so many times that every word is imprinted on his vocal cords. Needless to say, their version of that song is good. Their originals are rad. However, the real mind-blower is their Misfits-style cover of Hall and Oat’s “Maneater.” “Watch out boy, she’ll chew you up” gets a whole new meaning. –MP Johnson (Nothing But A Nightmare)


DILLINGER FOUR:
Civil War: LP
It’s a shame that with bands like Dillinger Four, bands with incredibly loyal followings and back catalogs of classic, benchmark records, it’s almost “uncool” to say that the new album is your favorite one, that somehow in the last decade this band finally managed to outdo their classic debut LP. Well fuck that. Civil War is Dillinger Four’s best record. I’m saying it. I don’t care what nostalgia you attach to whichever earlier release, this one’s better. It just is. Why do so many people insist on stubbornly holding a certain record over a band’s head for their entire career? Do you want your favorite band to continue releasing inferior records for the remainder of their existence so you can go home and spin that same old, worn-out Midwestern Songs LP in some kind of smug satisfaction? Just admit it to yourself and everyone around you: this one is the best one. Oh, and you know what? I thought Situationist Comedy was the best one before Civil War was released. Yep, it’s true. I think this band gets better and better with age. Speaking of which, I had the immense pleasure of interviewing D4 about the new record, during which I asked a potentially troubling question concerning the band’s advancing age, their penchant for partying and resulting bodily wear-and-tear. Perhaps my whiskey-fuelled wording jumbled what I thought was a perfectly innocent question, but Lane clearly took offense, stating that I was comparing him to a visibly degenerating and undeniably ghoulish Mick Mars. This was certainly not the case and I offer my humblest apology. Luckily, Paddy diffused the brow-furrowing situation with another shot of whiskey (that I initially thought was a glass of whiskey) and a promise to kick the internet’s ass when he finds it, thus bringing up another important little nugget: the band’s openness and honesty when I broached the touchy subject of Civil War’s “leaking” and the ensuing “drama.” I don’t need to go into detail, but the most important thing I took from it, and the interview as a whole, was how comfortable and sincere the whole exchange was—which mirrors perfectly the way I feel about this record. It was immediately intimate and familiar, serious but lighthearted, going right for both your head and your gut. That’s just how Dillinger Four operates and it comes across plainly both in person and on their records. And, really, what more can you ask for from a punk band? These four dudes encapsulate everything one should hope to find in punk rock and I think everyone who recognizes that is truly thankful for what they’ve given us to this point. –Dave Williams (Fat)


DILLINGER FOUR:
Civil War: LP
I’ve found myself listening to this album quite a bit since I got my hands on it. For what seemed like the longest time, I couldn’t say why. It sounds like D4, but seems slower and more melodic than their earlier stuff. It’s not a straight-up aural assault, but it’s neither vacuous nor jejune. It’s an honest and passionate album. My favorite tracks appear in the middle of the record. “Minimum Wage Is a Gateway Drug” is perhaps the most depressing song I’ve heard in quite some time. “The Classical Arrangement” is one of the best commentaries on the religious, spiritual, or whatever that I’ve heard by way of song. But those aren’t the only good ones on here; the album is full of ‘em. I guess that’s why I’ve been listening to it so much lately: because it’s really good. –Vincent Battilana (Fat)


DILLINGER FOUR:
Civil War: LP
Dillinger Four is your friend that’s says, “Dude, give me ten bucks and I’ll give you a hundred back two weeks from now.” And then he doesn’t return your phone call for five months. Then, when you see him again four years later, he’s wearing nice clothes and pulls out a check and writes a million dollars on it then hands it to you. It’s kind of like that, but instead of a million dollars, you get a really amazing record. –Bryan Static (Fat)


DILLINGER FOUR:
Civil War: LP
D4 remains the champions of relevance. This record is like some kind of political antibiotic to the bullshit we have to deal with every time we turn on the TV. After all these years, D4 is still angry and still meaningful. And, even on top of the melodic punk that they’ve paved a decently sized reputation with, they’re still trying new, interesting things. Is that a fucking loop pedal he’s using? What is this, Enya? What ever it is, it’s fucking great. –Daryl Gussin (Fat)


DILLINGER FOUR:
Civil War: CD
You know what’s horrible? I don’t think I’ve ever really listened to Dillinger Four before this album. I was a roadie for a band that played at the Triple Rock (which Dillinger Four vocalist/guitarist Erik co-owns) in Minneapolis and that is a quality venue. The food was good and everyone was kind. So my only loose connection to D4 had been a positive one, yet I wasn’t totally sure what this album would be like. Fat Wreck material can be real hit and miss for me. I put in their latest disc, Civil War, and was really impressed. In fact, very impressed. The music is fun as hell, catchy, and the use of two vocalists keeps things from getting boring. D4 also do a good job of contrasting song tempos so that nothing seems too slow or too fast. The lyrics are much more intelligent than most bands on Fat (NOFX, I’m looking at you), dealing with friendships, religion, the passing of loved ones and so on. At thirteen songs clocking in at thirty-nine minutes, you’re getting your money’s worth. If you’ve ever enjoyed poppy punk or punk with a pop edge or pop punk or punk pop music or any combination thereof, then you will like this. –Kurt Morris (Fat)


LOBLAWS, THE:
Won’t Stop!: 7" EP
Mutant Pop Records is kind of like our national parks system: even when I don’t partake in what they have to offer I’m comforted by their existence. I’ve never seen Old Faithful but I want to know that I could. Similarly with Mutant Pop; I don’t dig every record Tim puts out but I want him to stay in business. The Lowlaws aren’t a fountain of brilliance but Won’t Stop is a pleasant spin. Like most of the Mutant Pop roster, the Lowlaws mix punk and pop, uptempo guitar buzz with power pop harmonies. The songs are good as they are but I can’t silence my inner producer. I’d love to hear these guys stack up some Beach Boys-caliber vocal arrangements and ditch the Marky Ramone guitar tone. They have the potential to be a brilliant pop band. Then they’d move from “neat looking postcard” to “you have to drive out of your way to see this!” status. –Mike Faloon (Mutant Pop)


IMPULSE INT’L, THE:
Saturday Suzie: 7” EP
I was listening to this the other night before I went out to see some show, and these three songs ran through my mind the whole time. More high quality power pop that is infectious. “Saturday Suzie” has a freakbeat approach and gets the legs moving, head to shaking, and adrenalin racing. “One Girl, Eight Wheels” is a love song to Roller Derby girls, and “Something’s Happening Here” shifts gear to a slightly reserved pace. Something about this song makes me think of NYC. Maybe it’s the guitar tone? Either way, another great record from these fine folks. Act now and get one of the 500 pressed on hot pink vinyl. Operators are standing by... –Matt Average (Mutant Pop, www.mutantpop.com)


BOYS, THE:
The Punk Rock Anthology: 2 x CD
The Boys were one o’ the more obscure (at least in the U.S.) bands to come out of the first waves of the English punk thing. This has always struck me as odd because, while not as incendiary as some of their contemporaries, they penned some barn burners in their time that also happened to be wicked catchy to boot. What the Ramones did with the template provided by the Beach Boys and the Stooges, the Boys did with the one provided by the Beatles and Spector, delivering tunes that melded razor-sharp pop hooks to punk bluster and breakneck tempos. A huge chunk of those tunes—“First Time,” “Brickfield Nights,” “Sick on You” (quite possibly the catchiest song ever to reference both a relationship gone sour and vomiting), “Classified Susie,” “Jimmy Brown,” and “Tenement Kids,” to name a few—can be found crammed onto the two discs here, along with assorted demos, single tracks and versions, resulting in a mighty fine primer for those unfamiliar with the band. The tunes are mapped out, more or less, in chronological order, which allows the listener the chance to hear how, over time, the band sacrificed the manic tempos for a more power pop approach, a sound that, at first blush, seems like the primary influence for more recent bands like the Exploding Hearts. In the end, the worst case scenario for any potential listener is forty-seven tracks from one of punk’s unsung greats. –Jimmy Alvarado (www.cherryred.co.uk)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Rock n’Roll Is in My Soul: 2 x CD
A two-disc comp, strung by new versus old releases, then quartered by genre (pop punk, ska/psychobilly, hardcore/punk, neo-swing/RAB). Disc one features Spookshow, Big John Bates, Sarah Blackwood, Ripmen, etc. Disc two has the Yeti Girls, the Camaros, The Cheeks, etc. The cover of “She-Bop” is fantastic. Although some of the tracks are annoyingly genre-specific, some of them are off-the-chart standouts. This is overall a solid showing of force for the wide Wolverine roster. –Jessica Thiringer (Wolverine)


COWER:
Hatred Songs: 7"
Cower resides somewhere in the audible crusty punk house between Iron Lung and Tragedy. Pounding at times, driving at others. It’s always heavy, and it’s always intense. Amidst the legions of copycats and style-prisoners, Cower take healthy helping of various sub-sub-genres such as power violence, d-beat, noise, and melodic crust to formulate a sound that seems naturally punishing. And while these songs of hatred may not be executed as proficiently as the aforementioned bands might have, they are still a promising detonation of unforgiving, unwavering noise. –Daryl Gussin (Television)


DEAD LAZLO’S PLACE:
Lazlo for Life: CD
Hardcore veterans from L.A. that produce in-your-face punk rock. Their drummer took over as singer, but, thankfully, this is no Phil Collins debacle. The songs are about drinking, rocking, and Charlie’s Angels. There’s a good English Dogs cover in here, too. “Blues for Jerry” and “Fresh Bruises” pack the most beef into this rock burger. Looks like they are trying to wrestle the “Budweiser drinking band” title from Gang Green. This release puts them well within the pack. –Sean Koepenick (Burning Tree)


GHOSTWRITER:
Wreck the City: LP
Ghostwriter is Austin musician Steve Schechter’s one-man-band act, fairly similar to that of Scott H. Biram or Bob Log III, though more traditional and certainly less experimental than Bob Log. Much of this brings to mind GG Allin’s late in life country output. Whereas when GG Allin and Bob Log were innovators in the punk world by reclaiming the redneck/hillbilly music and culture as a sort of found art and, in turn, created something of their own with it, this record here breaks no new ground. For example, the cover of Bo Diddley’s “Pills” is inferior to the original (not to mention the New York Dolls’ version) and Ghostwriter’s take on the Townes Van Zandt gospel, “Two Hands,” recorded here as “Idol Hands,” is replete with cliche lines about fighting and drinking whiskey. Plinking strings on a banjo and wheezing into a harmonica at the same, sadly, do not make up for such lyrical pabulum. –Jeff (End Of The West)


TRIUMPH OF LETHARGY SKINNED ALIVE TO DEATH:
Bird Songs: LP
A Seattle underground supergroup if there ever was one (Temple of the Dog?), TOLSATD began as a two-member experiment between Spencer Moody and Corey Brewer, setting out to make a sparse, lonely, and chorus-free garagey drone. In the years since they’ve grown up and out; adding three more members, bringing bombast to the mire, bellows to the heartbroken whispers, and choruses. Stretched legs, a dash of pretension, and some solid rockers. I have a feeling their next record is going to break necks and hopefully send them on a tour. –Andrew Flanagan –Guest Contributor (Teenage Teardrops, www.teenageteardrops.com)


STRANDED:
Broken Bottles and the Way We Live: 7"
Great little record. For lack of a better analogy, I think of this record as skate punk that has grown up: age has put more meat on the bones—it’s not as gangly and sparse as in days of yore—and a bucket full of wisdom backs up the added weight. –The Lord Kveldulfr (A.D.D.)


RUNNAMUCKS:
Clawing Back: CD
Another great record from this band. A perfect mix of rock’n’roll with hardcore punk. The songs are driving, catchy, manic, and charged with high energy. They use a Farfisa organ, maracas, piano, and a tambourine in a few songs. Far from being your typical punk band. Everything about this is solid: the lyrics, the way they’re delivered, and the musicianship. You can’t lose with this. –Matt Average (Six Weeks)


TEN VOLT SHOCK:
6 Null 3: CD
Perhaps a quick description would be something like Skull Kontrol crossed with Drive Like Jehu and Circus Lupus. Bouncy rhythms at a hectic pace that sounds as if everything could go horribly wrong with the slightest misstep. The songs are built on the rhythm while the guitar stabs and needles. Underneath it all is a tunefulness that reveals itself as each song plays itself out. “Captured Snakes” is the cut of the album. Jagged, dark, hyper, and catchy. Not bad, not bad... –Matt Average (Dead Tank)


RICH WHITE MALES:
We Ain’t No Musicians: 7"
Piss yellow vinyl. Real fast. Super snotty. Kind of reminds me of the Randumbs, which means I’ll probably listen to this record ten thousand times. Did I say they were fast? –Jim Ruland (Cabana One)


REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY:
Destroy All Evidence: CD
Must confess I haven’t heard anything musical Vic Bondi’s done since he was screamin’ “Buy this War” with Articles of Faith, due more to lack of access and bein’ skint than disdain for his efforts, but, either way, I ain’t the go-to guy if you wanna know how this fits into his greater musical career. What I can tell you is this is one doozy of a record. Some traces of AOF’s slower churning can be found mixed in here and there, especially in “Bush is Brezhnev” and “Backbite,” but the bulk draws heavily from the mid/late-‘80s DC sound (makes sense considering J. Robbins of Government Issue/Jawbox is a co-conspirator here)—creatively complex delivery, heavy vibe, and a dash of pop sensibility buried deep enough to crawl up and smack you without you seein’ it coming. The lyrics are topical and top notch, as can be expected, and the whole thing is imbued with a sense of immediacy that is too often lacking these days, especially in the output of punkers a bit longer in the tooth. The real highlights here are the folky “Day after Day,” and its electric doppelganger, “Wraiths,” stunners both with much to say and a good hook to get you to pay attention. Hell, they even jack the opening of “Who’s that Lady” from the Isley Bros. elsewhere and put it to good use. No slouches, these guys. –Jimmy Alvarado (Alternative Tentacles)


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