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No Idea Records

Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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NERVES, THE:
One Way Ticket: LP
Especially over the past fifteen years, The Nerves’ 7” has become more and more recognized as a mythical Ebay artifact/holy grail of late ‘70s (‘76-’79) L.A. power pop. And for good reason. In the years between then and now, everyone from Blondie to the Exploding Hearts have found much to admire from what Peter Case (who would go on to form the Plimsouls and re-record versions of these songs), Paul Collins (The Paul Collins Beat), and Jack Lee created over a four-year stint. I don’t know if I’ve ever said this about a band, but The Nerves make delicious songs, especially the studio tracks. They’re fun, yet substantive, infinitely listenable, crafted immaculately, and just cool to listen to. They’ve got an inimitable style about them and they make the listener feel good. (They remind me of a band like The Saints, who, for some reason got largely overlooked when they were active, but you can’t second guess their early catalog.) But to merely pigeonhole The Nerves into power pop requires either an expansion or reconsideration of its current definition. More likely, The Nerves are much more than “just a power pop band,” as evidenced by the variation on their approach to music on this record: acoustic guitar-driven songs; songs with Beatles and Buddy Holly sinew; and muscled and lean ballads fill out the grooves next to their best-known raveup, “Hanging on the Telephone.” The a-side has nine studio recordings. It’s the gold. The b-side is nine live and demo tracks (like how the Dils record was released). It’s the gravy. Thirty years after its initial release, revel in the first-ever non-bootleg LP of The Nerves. It’s safe to say that the band finally got the release their status and reputation deserves… and at an attractive price non-collectors are able to afford. Great stuff. –Todd Taylor (Alive, aliveenergy.com)


NERVES, THE:
One Way Ticket: LP
Especially over the past fifteen years, The Nerves’ 7” has become more and more recognized as a mythical Ebay artifact/holy grail of late ‘70s (‘76-’79) L.A. power pop. And for good reason. In the years between then and now, everyone from Blondie to the Exploding Hearts have found much to admire from what Peter Case (who would go on to form the Plimsouls and re-record versions of these songs), Paul Collins (The Paul Collins Beat), and Jack Lee created over a four-year stint. I don’t know if I’ve ever said this about a band, but The Nerves make delicious songs, especially the studio tracks. They’re fun, yet substantive, infinitely listenable, crafted immaculately, and just cool to listen to. They’ve got an inimitable style about them and they make the listener feel good. (They remind me of a band like The Saints, who, for some reason got largely overlooked when they were active, but you can’t second guess their early catalog.) But to merely pigeonhole The Nerves into power pop requires either an expansion or reconsideration of its current definition. More likely, The Nerves are much more than “just a power pop band,” as evidenced by the variation on their approach to music on this record: acoustic guitar-driven songs; songs with Beatles and Buddy Holly sinew; and muscled and lean ballads fill out the grooves next to their best-known raveup, “Hanging on the Telephone.” The a-side has nine studio recordings. It’s the gold. The b-side is nine live and demo tracks (like how the Dils record was released). It’s the gravy. Thirty years after its initial release, revel in the first-ever non-bootleg LP of The Nerves. It’s safe to say that the band finally got the release their status and reputation deserves… and at an attractive price non-collectors are able to afford. Great stuff. –Todd Taylor (Alive, aliveenergy.com)


NERVES, THE:
One Way Ticket: CD
The Nerves and I go way back, before I even really knew who the hell they were. They had a song on a Trouser Press compilation, “Working Too Hard,” that I played over and over and over again. More recently, I have seen Peter Case solo a couple times and also with The Plimsouls. I was lucky enough to catch Paul Collins Beat live this year, too. Now if Jack Lee returns… But wait—what every music fan should really demand is a full-blown Nerves reunion. This CD is rock solid from start to finish. Every song, no matter how raw it is presented here, is a power pop gem. I really can’t think of another band that has had three songwriters of this fire and skill in one outfit. “Walking Out on Love,” “One Way Ticket,” and “Hanging on the Telephone” are enough to put them at the top of the power pop hill—without question. I even like “Come Back and Stay,” once I black out Paul Young’s ‘80s schlock version from my mind. This is a fantastic and long overdue release from an AWESOME band. Get this now and you’ll be hard pressed to get the tunes out of your head. –Sean Koepenick (Alive)


MYSTERY GIRLS:
Incontinopia: CD
Considering The Mystery Girls’ incredibly mediocre last effort (Something in the Water)—which at even five dollars from the discount record bin, the album’s still a rip-off—the brilliance of Incontinopia is blindsiding. In four years, The Mystery Girls have developed precipitously in musical and lyrical development. In particular, Michael Zink on bass is shit hot; just check the lines on “Quit Your Flyin’ Around” and “I Took the Poison.” Main songwriter Jordan Davis is penning stuff worth remembering. And Casey Grajek’s sole contribution (“We’re So Illegal”) is also noteworthy. Forget Something in the Water; pick Incontinopia—a little Compulsive Gamblers and Flash Express influenced—and give these kids a second chance. Well worth it. –Ryan Leach (In The Red)


MORAL CRUX:
Top 40 Hits and Pop Favorites: CD
Moral Crux! You are tampering with my very existence! Did you underestimate my complete and total love of your music? Did you not understand the very real consequences of putting all of your best songs on one CD? Did you not realize that I may not be able to handle this, physically, psychologically, and, dare I say, spiritually? The pressure mounts in my brain! The uncontrollable desire to dance! One amazingly political (and pop punk!) song after another! It does not stop! The questions arise! Does everyone feel this way about music? Were 7” inches created to dole out songs in reasonable doses, so as to avoid this very problem? At any rate, it goes without saying that if this were a cereal, it’d be Lucky Charms…several boxes of Lucky Charms, given to you all at once, with an empty stomach and a large spoon! –Maddy (Jailhouse)


MORAL CRUX:
Pop Culture Assassins: LP
Extraordinary re-release alert! On super heavy and colored (half black, half white—it’s crazy!) vinyl, no less! Lookout released this in 2003, but I don’t recall it being released on vinyl. (Record nerds, please issue a correction letter, if needed!) But let’s stop beating around the bush! If you don’t like Moral Crux, THERE IS SOMETHING WRONG WITH YOU. And not in the cool, “Man, I was weird in high school” way. No, in the legitimately wrong, fan-of-Eddie-Vedder kind of way. In fact, I plan to be filing an amicus brief before the International Criminal Court, which is currently investigating the criminal nature of this band’s underrated stature! Moral Crux have continually done what some might have thought impossible: create the perfect combination of political punk and pop punk. If you haven’t heard the song “Firing Squad,” then you need to put down your Cherry Coke and Wii controller (yes, even Mario Kart can be paused!) and take a rickshaw down to your local record store post haste! If this were a cereal, it’d be Lucky Charms! Yes! Buy this! –Maddy (Jailhouse)


MONUMENT:
A 3 Song 7”: 7”
Monument, from Silver Spring, Maryland provides us with three intricately woven emo songs on this self-released 7”. In the vein of emo prior to it becoming a dirty/household word, drawing from influences such as Braid, American Football, and Cap’n Jazz, the songs are super tight and catchy as all hell. The balancing act of the different vocalists complements the music perfectly. Gritty guitars with screeching vocals interplay with a second warm and sweet jangly guitar and flitting naïf-like vocals. Personal, poetic lyrics are included on liner notes that were handwritten, photocopied, and cut to fit into an envelope included with the records. The record also appears to be hand-numbered, however it is also possible that the band members were simply amusing themselves by numbering this record as number 69 of 420. Regardless, it seems like extra special care was spent in creating the music as well as the packaging. The effort, and the final product, are both met with sincere appreciation. –Jeff Proctor –Guest Contributor (Self-released)


MONIKERS:
Wake Up: CD
I’d been thinking about picking this up since I saw that it had been released. Nothing that I’ve heard from Monikers has disappointed me, but I just put off buying the album. Now that I’ve heard it, I am upset that I didn’t pick it up right when it came out. This album ups the ante for future output from the band. This is a full-length full of melodic pop punk with gruff vocals in debt to early ‘90s EastBay punk—but they’re definitely good for the loan. They take what their forbearers gave to them and made it a bit bigger. The lyrical content is depressing in a life affirming way—it’s like I can put this on for a pick me up when I’m feelin’ down and it can make me feel better even when I’m already feelin’ all right. Even the acoustic track at the end works! –Vincent Battilana (Kiss Of Death)


MENTHOLS, THE:
Miracle Slips: 7”
These guys aren’t too definable—on the last single I thought they were good dick-around rockers like some of the wanking moments of The Spits, but this single is better than the last. “Miracle Slips” is a great rocker, sludging along. “Rats and Insects” is a little more of a meandering garage jam, pretty cool too—more messy. When it gets down to it, if these guys are playing a basement near you, it’s worth driving around to find it. –Speedway Randy (UFO Dictator)


MARKED MEN:
Ghosts: CD
I have no idea how the Marked Men do it. They are, musically, much smarter than I’ll ever be. How is it that four notes into the first new song, it’s instantly recognizable as a Marked Men song, yet, song after song there are surprises? How is it, that listen after listen, the songs take off their initial masks and reveal new surprises, new dimensions, new faces? How can songs be so layered, so that the tenth time you listen to it, it’s different than the first time you heard it, but it had such a visceral, immediate initial impact? I. Have. No. Idea. I’m not one to compare the Marked Men to themselves. I have everything, from their first 7” on Mortville to this, their last (probably) album, and it all hits different pleasure centers. If, by some chance, you’re reading this, saying to yourself, “Well, what do they sound like, dummy, so I can make a choice here?” Regardless of your financial situation, I suggest you do some saving and pick up anything put out by the Marked Men. This record will probably be the most available. (Their previous vinyl has been woefully under pressed, but I’ve been assured that steps are being taken to rectify that situation.) I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating: the Marked Men are at the contemporary pinnacle of what it means to make your own music, control every aspect of recording it, and have the time to perfect it. If you’re holding Razorcake and like it somewhat, odds are in your favor that you’ll love the Marked Men. It’s early February when I’m writing this and there’s no doubt that this record is in the top ten of 2009. It’s impossible that it’ll be surpassed by nine other records; of that I’m absolutely sure. –Todd Taylor (Dirtnap)


MAKEOUT PARTY, THEE:
Play Pretend: Cassette
I found this tape under a reclining chair in my apartment. That means one of two things: Either my chair has taken a liking to jangly, garage pop music or it was sent to me for review and somehow got kicked out of sight. I tend to favor the first theory. You see, this particular reclining chair has been confined to the computer room, where it doesn’t get much attention. That’s a big change for it. Not too long ago, it lapped up the sunshine that poured through the big glass patio door into the living room of my Grandma’s assisted living apartment. It was surrounded by all sorts of other friendly furniture, busy making visitors comfortable. When my Grandma passed away, furniture was dispersed through the family. Now this recliner sits alone most days. It probably needed something to make it smile. I think it picked the right cassette for the job. –MP Johnson (Burger)


MAKEOUT PARTY!, THEE:
Play Pretend: Cassette
My first experience with Thee Makeout Party! was happening to see them live a few years ago. Admittedly I was soured, but mainly because I’d gone out to see The Trashies, and had to leave before they played. Then I saw them again this past summer, and realized “Man, these guys are a pretty fuckin’ awesome power pop band”. I’m still not too familiar, but I’m pretty sure this is just a straight re-issue of their latest full length on cassette, with hand-color, penciled art, and individually numbered, which if you’re going to do a tape, is how you should do it. Nice. –Joe Evans III (Burger)


MAHONIES, THE:
Hey We Got Coneys. It’s Great, Let’s Dig In!: 7”
Man, lots of stuff going on here. Eight-song 7”, but not a D.R.I. explosion here. More of a spastic, fucked-up couple of guys (I heard ex-members of the great Terrible Twos) making noisy rock that is influenced by in-jokes and music we probably never heard of. Great shit. Spastic in a fun way, catchy moments of dirty fuzzy sounds, some weird timing, actual lyrics—but again, in-jokes or their own language, although it’s much easier on the senses than The Hospitals (whom I love). There is a definite blast of creativity and energy in The Mahonies that other bands could learn from. It’s one thing to sound convulsive and different than the usual garage psychosis, and another thing to really pull it off in a compelling way. Kickass record. –Speedway Randy (X!)


LOVE ME NOTS, THE:
Detroit: LP
Classy, tasteful farfisa-driven garage rock from Phoenix. Think of a mix of the easier-listening Dirtbombs (Jim Diamond’s sonic trademarks are all over the recording process) and the Detroit Cobras: a chanteuse in white Go Go boots, leading a band whose chops are precise, meaty, and swaggering. What makes it stand up are all the small elements that give The Love Me Nots their own fingerprints on the crime scene: surfy reverb; bright, slippery guitar tones; and Crampsian swagger. It’s forward-thinking retro that’s custom fitted and tailored down to the last note, the last detail (the cream colored vinyl matches the title font on the sleeve). Great stuff. –Todd Taylor (Project Infinity, projectinfinityrecords.com)


LOVE BOAT:
Imaginary Beatings of Love: CD
I don’t think I’m alone when I say that I was disappointed with the Clorox Girls’ last record, J´aime Les Filles. I’m totally fine with punk bands discovering pop, but when it’s a complete divorce from their previous efforts into a lighter pair of loafers, it makes me feel like a musical orphan. Love Boat, like Thee Makeout Party and Mojomatics—although they don’t sound too much alike on the surface—take that jangly, gutsy pop that’s a cross between the Beach Boys and the Beatles and jump into this quickly aging millennium, never forgetting the importance of keeping the contemporary crunch and tackle in their songs. Imaginary Beatings of Love is bright, crisp, and very listenable. –Todd Taylor (Alien Snatch, www.aliensnatch.com)


LOOK MEXICO:
Gasp Asp: 7”
Let me just start out by saying that the artwork by Joshua Mikel and Jerrod Landon Parker is fucking amazing. I spent a lot of time staring at the creepy monsters on the cover. The music, unfortunately, is really easy to ignore. I’ve had to play this a lot. It’s so easy to tune out, maybe because it sounds like a lot of bad songs being played on the radio. –Rene Navarro (Tiny Engines, info@tinyengines.net)


LOLLIGAGS, THE:
Out of Perversity Join Hands: CDEP
This seven-song EP from Athens, Georgia’s The Lolligags is pure synth pop joy reminiscent of Ladytron, or a band I reviewed a few issues back, UV Protection. Female vocals lead the way and are layered throughout the album with danceable beats backing them up. The music isn’t overly cheery; it retains a dark, thick side to it (I can hear Depeche Mode and Joy Division similarities at times) but that doesn’t mean this wouldn’t get you shakin’ your ass. Still, it would be cool to hear them explore some more of that darker synth sound that would piss off the kids on the dance floor. –Kurt Morris (HHBTM)


LIBYANS:
Self-titled: 12” EP
This band released one of my favorite 7”s of 2008. The Welcome to the Neighborhood EP fucked my shit up, and this 12” is just as seeped in punchy, old school riffs and hardened, unremorseful melodies. Though this record was written in the middle of a line-up change, the songs are consistently pissed, and the difference is hardly noticeable. I think it’s pretty safe to say The Libyans are not only one of the best female-fronted hardcore punk bands around today, but also put together some of the best packaging. Spray paint on translucent paper in front of a full color cover is wicked awesome. –Daryl Gussin (Upstate Chamber of Commerce)


LET’S GROW:
Disease of Modern Times: 12”
People have been punching each other in the face since the beginning of time, and it’s still effective and shocking when it happens. That’s how I feel about this type of hardcore. There are scads of bands in Infest and Youth Of Today shirts playing fast and pissed off, but it tends to work. Case in point, I don’t feel like this 12” is bringing anything new to the game, but it will leave you full of adrenaline and bloody your nose. –CT Terry (Know)


LET’S DANCE / AVENUE ROSE:
SPLIT: 7”
Split 7”s are supposed to have different bands, but I had never gotten one that had a different RPM on each side. Let’s Dance seemed a bit formulaic with some high energy guitars and strong choruses. They’re two pop punk songs, both about girls. The first track, “Crazy,” was the strongest of the two, off their Outta Time record, so maybe that album rules. The second band, Avenue, Rose wasn’t very exciting and eventually led me to simply stop flipping the record. –Rene Navarro (Longshot Music)


LE FACE:
Isolation: LP
Whoa—dessssssperate. Amazing minimal punk so anxious that it’s energetic way past its simplicity. Coming from outside L.A., Le Face describes themselves as “neo-dada noise.” This could be The Urinals with Charlie Feathers added on as front man. Contagious rhythms, jittery vocals pushing and pulling it forward. You can hear despondent ‘80s sensibilities in songs like “Isolation,” “Manic Depression,” and “Tylenol Killer”—spooky, sharp edges. This is as good as anything else coming out of this city of a thousand small towns. When I was in ninth grade and saw Suburbia on VHS, I was transfixed and saved from my own suburbs. Who were these outcast kids in L.A.? When they walked in to the kid’s bedroom and The Germs’ “No God” was screeching from the record player, I had to find it. Got the same feeling when I started this record. “Who are these guys?” If you order the LP direct from the label you can also buy a (limited to 350) bonus 7” with three new songs (two non-LP and one alternate version) that were produced by The Screamers’ Paul Roessler. –Speedway Randy (Dead Beat)


LARSONS, THE:
Fictitious Disorder: CD-R
Straight-forward, late ‘70s/early ‘80s style punk, with lyrics about zombies and horror movies and such. The most obvious influence is the Angry Samoans, as the last of these five songs is a cover of “Lights Out.” The fact that this was recorded on a four-track and fairly lo-fi only helps, though I feel it starts to lose energy towards the end, and I like it a little more when the songs are really short, like roughly around the minute mark. Otherwise, this is pretty neat. –Joe Evans III (Hands Of Fate)


KNIFE PARTY:
Just Like You, Only Better: CD

Look, kind folks at Razorcake, I’m not really into hearing any more bands with that basic ‘77-’80s punk sound. I mean, this might make me seem like a dick, but, really, I’ve got this area pretty well covered and there’s not much more...wait...this rocks! This totally kicks ass! This guy’s voice, so spastic. Those riffs, so punchy. You just can’t argue with good rock’n’roll. Just like you, only better? Indeed. Indeed.

–Craven (Superbob)


KING KHAN & BBQ SHOW:
Animal Party: 7”
Two long and jammy songs from this consistently bad ass duo. And as much as I loved What’s for Dinner?, it didn’t come with a coloring book containing pictures of oddly human-looking animals. And, sure, I’m probably never gonna color this coloring book, but you can guarantee that this single is getting a decent amount of spins on my turntable. –Daryl Gussin (Fat Possum)


KING GENERATOR:
Self-titled: 12” EP
I try to stay away from using words like “brutal” to describe music these days. However, I have to make an exception for this record. King Generator (members are Jamie Thomson (Shank, The Process), Dave Witte (Discordance Axis, Melt Banana, Municipal Waste), and Mike Hill (Tombs, Anodyne)) certainly crank out brutal hardcore that is blistering at times and slow and anguished at others. “Out Of Time” sounds like the sky is collapsing and everything is bursting in slow motion. “My One Regret” is the slower of the songs; the sort of song you listen to and stew in your hate and alienation. This is seven songs of ugliness and despair. Embrace the darkness. –Matt Average (Tank Crimes)


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Razorcake Podcast Player



·IRON CROSS
·TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET
·ORPHANS, THE
·SQUALORA
·NOTHINGS, THE
·#318 with Daryl Gussin
·KUNG FU MONKEYS, THE
·Webcomic Wednesdays #77
·BELUSHIS, THE


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