Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:The Rikk Agnew Band, Symbol Six, Barrio Tiger and A Pretty Mess
· 2:Interview with Adam Gnade
· 3:Sign Up for a Razorcake Automatic Payment Plan
· 4:#323 - Future Virgins Edition with Todd Taylor and Mike Faloon
· 5:Burn Burn Burn Interview


Subscriptions
New Subscriptions
Renewal
Stickers and Buttons
The NEW "Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Nights and Days in a Dark Carnival by Craven Rock
Chantey Hook, Underground 7" *Limited Color Vinyl
Chantey Hook, Underground 7"
Razorcake #80
Future Virgins 7" NEW!


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

No Idea Records

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

TSU SHI MA MI RE:
Pregnant Fantasy: CD
Where do I start? Three women from Japan who play an interesting blend of Japanese pop, college rock, ska, noise, and more. Even some Cookie Monster thrown in for good measure. It’s almost a weird mixture of Sonic Youth meets Shonen Knife. Most of the lyrics seem to be in Japanese. Let me pass this along to a friend and see if he digs it. –Donofthedead (Benten Tokyo)


TOP TEN:
Self-titled: 7"
Tina Luchessi (Tina and the Total Babes, Trashwomen, Bobbyteens) channels her inner Bay City Rollers into a band that’d be perfect for the 7th inning stretch for the original Bad News Bears. (They’re so tough, one of ‘em plays baseball in heels.) Think Rip Off Records by way of the bubblegum pop/boilermaker* pop punk of the Pinkz, Checkers, and BitchSchool. Another way to put it is that it’s forlorn love pop with a lipstick tube-shaped switchblade put to your neck. Comes with collectible baseball cards. Sexy stuff like this is super easy to listen along to and like. (* = In the opening scene of the original Bad News Bears, Walter Matthau pours out the top of his beer in the parking lot, fills it back up with whiskey (a boilermaker), and gets to the business teaching kids how to fuck up their lives with dignity.) –Todd Taylor (Lipstick)


TOKYO ELECTRON:
Self-titled: CD
Ryan Rousseau has an amazing knack for playing with tons of bands yet keeping them all in a different realm (The Wongs, Digital Leather, Destruction Unit, The Reatards). Tokyo Electron is the most straight of them all and it’s great. Ryan splits his time between Memphis and Phoenix and this is my metaphor for the band. Pretty heavy, fuzzy guitars and drums pound ahead but stay poppy, vocals are gravelly but clear with backing vocals… maybe the vinyl master got left in the sun. Rad. –Speedway Randy (Empty)


THROW RAG:
13 Ft & Rising: CD
Über punk courtesy of BYO Records with über punk legends Jello Biafra, Keith Morris, and Lemmy Kilmeister. Classic west coast punk via snotty, chorus-y, loud, tight, and controlled songs with a wild guitar and a thumping, defined bass. Hair metal vocals bandied about so you don’t forget it’s Throw Rag. Frenetically DK-infused throughout, with the exception of some Tenderloin-styled roadhouse rock, a jaw-harping hillbilly do-si-do on “So. 5th St.” and some no-frills pogo-ing punk on “The Promise.” Biafra and Morris join in a standard Jello epic at the end. Produced by Cameron Webb (Social Distortion, Sum 41, Lit, Tenacious D, Ben Folds, Danzig, 311 and two American Idols). –Jessica Thiringer (BYO)


THIS DAMN TOWN/GUILTY HEARTS:
Split: 7"
Each band gives us two tracks, This Damn Town laying down “Lovesick and Stupid” and “Something Bad,” and Guilty Hearts rocking “I Learned My Lesson” and “Seven Days, Seven Ways.” The Guilty Hearts side has a great swamp blues feel calling to mind the Dutch combo Lo Lite. I can imagine being knifed in a back alley somewhere while these tunes play in the background. This Damn Town’s singer howls his way through their songs, giving them a creepy, I’m-about-to-get-hustled tone. A moody release that I’ll certainly be giving a few more spins. –Josh Benke (Sonico)


TALK, THE:
The Sinners of Daughters: CD
It’s kind of like if The Pet Shop Boys weren’t as good as they were. And, I’m no Pet Shop Boys Fan. –Megan Pants (Morisen)


THIS DAMN TOWN:
This Time: 7"
This Damn Town brings to mind the type of bands that were running American regional music circuits in the ’20s through the ‘50s; bands that earned their living in roadhouses, shacks in the middle of forests, bunkers, and jamborees for little more than pay to the next town, dangerous encounters with any combination of women, men, shady business deals, drugs, and the love of music. But what came out of it no longer seems to exist on the national stage: steel-nerved, roots-ready bands that, no matter what they’re playing, is muscled through with meaty chops and excellent musicianship. It’s not flashy because those so secure in their playing can always kill the listener at any speed. Up front, is a languid—but not relaxed—Lux Interior vocalist that sweetens the deal. –Todd Taylor (Shake Your Ass)


SWITCH-UPS, THE:
Self-titled: CD
What the devil is this? On the cover of this thing you have a Sick Of It All’s Blood, Sweat and No Tears-style montage showing all these tuff-guy skinhead types swigging beers and flipping everyone the bird, but when you actually play the CD, it sounds like Clay Aiken fronting an emo street punk band. Egads, can this possibly be? Is this the American Idol punk record I never heard about because I’m a bad person who doesn’t watch “must see” TV? It actually hurts to listen to this… I can feel my testicles crawling up into my body to get away from the hideous vibrations. The tuneless voice and the dorky lounge lizard delivery falls somewhere between a bad Michale Graves impersonator whose tights are too tight and a Tupperware container of cold green beans. This whole band has all the fiery charisma of a black plastic pocket comb. Ugh. Ahhhh, but I don’t buy it. Nice try. You almost had me going this time. But I know when performance art comes up and drops a clown turd in my lap. Ha! You really had me going there. I kinda feel stupid now. Good one, though. –aphid (Reality Clash)


SUZY & LOS QUATTRO:
Ready to Go!: CD
The equation’s easy as shit: a Spanish version of early Suzi Quattro fronting the I-wanna-be-your-boyfriend side of the Ramones. The CD even has a font similar to the one used on Suzi’s Bravo Prasentiert album. For some reason, the replication doesn’t seem to really matter because those who they rip from either aren’t around or are far from releasing their best stuff. Suzy Chain’s got the angelic, yet-finger-in-mouth-pulling-the-bottom-lip-down, glossy go-go boots posturing down and isn’t hard to look at. But it’s her voice and the band’s immaculate playing that make this shamelessly fun pop. This shit sparkles and shakes buckles loose. If you’re geeky for female-fronted, Go-Go’s-approved skinny tie pop, or a fan of much of what Teenacide releases, put down that Knack album (it’s only got two good songs on it, anyway) and pick this up. –Todd Taylor (No Tomorrow)


SUB CITY DWELLERS:
Out on the Streets: CD
Sub City Dwellers have a skinhead ska sound complete with saxophone, keyboards, trombone, and trumpet. I enjoy the upbeat and energetic nature of most of the songs, such as “Hold the Pressure Down” and “1st and 55th Ave.” Although “1st and 55th Ave.” is a great song, it is musically and lyrically way too reminiscent of Rancid. Even the pronunciation of certain words in the song sound like Tim Armstrong’s signature speech impediment style of singing. “Dubcity” is an instrumental track that is slow and comparable to the Specials. Overall, I enjoy the ska vibe coming from this Canadian band. Small comment: at times, the vocals have a generic feel. On songs like “Tension,” the vocals have that low growl, losing-your-voice scream that almost any skinhead type of band tries to emulate when they sing. But, despite these tidbits, I still like this CD. –Jenny Moncayo (Steel Capped)


STREET BRATS:
See You at the Bottom: CD
Wow. Love this. Great, catchy energy and anger that I would expect from the brutal city of Chicago. And this delivers. Finally, punk rock and roll that doesn’t lose sight of the punk. Strong Clash/street punk influence but faster and more upbeat. And yeah, anger. Doesn’t lose energy as it moves along. My only criticism is the lack of variation in the songs. They seem to all have the same beat, and I think they’re capable of more. It’s definitely formulaic, but they do it well. I can tell these guys have been together for a while. A warning: the eighteen minutes of nonstop feedback on the hidden track at the end will have you clawing at your eyes! Turn the CD off immediately at the end to avoid risking loss of sight. A solid, worthwhile release. I’m gonna go listen to it again in my car. –KO! (Full Breach)


SPACE COWBOYS:
Dead End Streets & Devil’s Night: CD
More Swedes by way of the garage. Powerful, adrenaline-soaked, noisy, and distorted. Hellacopters and New Bomb Turks fans be aware. This is primed and ready to fire on all cylinders. A+. –Jessica Thiringer (Sonic Swirl)


SOVIET VALVES:
Sight That Harms/Gaze That Harms: 7” EP
From Perth, Australia, angular, but groove-locked pop in the vein of Wire with smart songwriting. Adventuresome but not tedious. Arty, but low on pretension. The bright and crisp guitar work reminds me of best of The Church. Actually, all four songs take me to a weird place of early ‘80s indie mope pop—a land choked with ruffly shirts, big hair, and bigger egos (Crowded House, Cure, early INXS)—but the Soviet Valves are on a punk steamroller twenty years hence. In their vision, only the catchiest of riffs and melodies are left standing while all the extraneous and weaker stuff is just flattened. I like it quite a bit. –Todd Taylor (Smartguy)


SONS OF CYRUS:
Rock&Rollercoaster: CD
Man, what did I do to deserve all the great review stuff this issue? Brother Retodd is welcome at the Cultural Ambassador’s dinner table any night of the week! Sons of Cyrus have an undeniable appreciation for Radio Birdman, most noticeably in their vocal stylings, though the Peepshows come to mind, too. The music varies from ‘60s-inspired tunes reminiscent of the Monkees and Woggles (“Switzerland” and “Running Too Slow”) to the aforementioned Birdman (“One of a Kind”) to a song that would please even the most diehard member of the Turbojugend (“Straight to Hell”). Track five, “Begging Me for More,” is the album’s triumph, a perfectly put together barn burner featuring the pitch perfect guest vocals of Alicja Trout. Rock&Rollercoaster makes me want to sprint around to the front of the line and take another ride. –Josh Benke (Big Brothel/ Dead Beat)


SONS OF CYRUS:
Monkey Business: CD
Another Swedish band I’ve been waiting to hear and with no disappointment. Fun, driving rock’n’roll that makes you think they’re in Detroit rather than Stockholm. Mixes covers of the Stones, Little Richard, and The Isley Brothers with solid originals. Wait, maybe they’re a new incarnation of The Sonics? That’s fair. One of those discs you grab when you are getting on the freeway and say, “Look, I don’t want to think about it. I just want to get there and have a good time doing it.” This is all their singles and comp tracks, everything the band has recorded besides their two full-lengths. –Speedway Randy (Dead Beat)


Social Combat:
Mail from Hell: CD
Spanish street punk band that covers Johnny Cash’s “Country Boy” and Rose Tattoo’s “Nice Boys Don’t Play R’n’R”—their hearts are in the right place. By-the-numbers stuff here. No complaints if you dig this genre. –greg (Step-1)


SNEAKY PINKS:
I Can’t Wait b/w Kill Kill Kill, Life Stoopid, I Stoopid: 7"
Word is that these guys are the Milli Vanilla of Tucson punk. They have a great live set, jump all over the place, and go nutty. The only difference between almost every other from-the-garage band you’ve seen is that it’s all synched. They don’t play a single note live. This, I assume, frees band members up to considerably more drinking and time to interact with the audience: two things that make going to a punk show fun. All this would be an interesting side note if the songs weren’t awesome on their own. Think the quirky, yet spot-on anxiety of M.O.T.O. and that balanced from-the-vaults but of the not-to-distant future feel of the Knockout Pills and you’ve hit it on the head. –Todd Taylor ($4, Rubber Vomit)


SMACKS, THE:
Protected by the Ejaculation of Serpents: CD
A two-man band on a art rock bender offer up twenty-seven tracks of minimalist skronk that’s better than one would expect. –Jimmy Alvarado (www.4dw.net/jtdoc)


SKIDS:
Scared to Dance: CD
Although a bit more obscure to the average contemporary punk/new wave enthusiast, the Skids enjoyed quite a bit of popularity at the dawn of the ‘80s, when their “Into the Valley” single was a hit on the British charts. Listening to this, their debut album, a quarter century later, it occurs to me that their quirky take on punk rock would’ve made barely a ripple if not for the considerable talents of Stuart Adamson, whose distinctive guitar style was a direct influence on U2’s the Edge, and was later put to great use in Adamson’s post-Skids band, Big Country, whose “In a Big Country” single was quite the U.S. hit in the early ‘80s. This is more than just a curio, however, as there are some interesting tunes to be found here, none of which easily fit in the stereotypical “punk” pigeonhole, but then again, that sense of experimentation is what made so much of the early punk output such a fun listen. –Jimmy Alvarado (Captain Oi)


SINALOA:
Footprints on Floorboards: CD
Did you know there is a font named Sinaloa? Also, there is a city named Sinaloa in Mexico. All that in one Yahoo search. Musically, this band has that sound of emo meets post punk that makes me want to download the font or find out facts about the city. –Donofthedead (Waking)


SIGNAL LOST:
You’ll Never Get Us Down Again: 7” EP
Articulate, strong-willed, female-fronted hardcore that effortlessly switches from singing to screaming and brings to mind such heavy hitters as France’s La Fraction. Although it’s not overt, there’s a definite love of 45 Grave overtone, too. When Ashley’s singing, it sounds like an opera in a graveyard that’s getting bombed: all the band members are pissed off, sound indestructible, and are ripping right through the rubble to attack the listener. Great stuff. –Todd Taylor (Prank)


SCURVY DOGS:
Relieve Yourself: 7” EP
The Scurvy Dogs play workmanlike hardcore punk that goes back to a time when geeks, misfits, socially awkward retards, drunks, and foreigners were on equal footing in the underground (the early ‘80s). They triangulate, roughly, between Vitamin X, Neos, and early DRI, and have reclaimed a nice corner of hardcore from the sports teams playing short hair metal masquerading as hardcore. They also cover a lot of ground in this EP, from French diplomacy, responsible drinking, and the social contract between hooker and pimp. Abrasive and cleansing, the Scurvy Dogs get the job done. –Todd Taylor (Kangaroo)


SCOTCH GREENS:
Professional: CD
In the same way The Pogues and The Dolomites (and even the Real McKenzies, if you want to stretch the analogy a bit) have built off the foundations of Irish and Scottish ballads, the Scotch Greens have done the same with American country. More rooted in bluegrass and country traditions (as opposed to, like, rawk) than bands like The Lazy Cowgirls and the Supersuckers, these guys have a pretty unique thing going on here. It’s generally urgent and up tempo and tight as shit, with galloping drums, banjo, and an occasional organ fighting for dominance over guitars that stay amped up in the double digits nearly the entire record. If you’re familiar with bands like Duck Duck Gray Duck and The Dickel Brothers then you’re in the ballpark; it’s just that the Scotch Greens are like the younger brother of those two groups, a kid who still loves the Misfits a little bit more than Merle Haggard, a kid who just can’t stop stepping on the distortion pedal and steadfastly refuses to acknowledge that people who wear duck’s ass haircuts and roll their cigarette packs into their shirtsleeves look silly. Liked this one a lot more than I thought I would. –Keith Rosson (DRT)


SCAT RAG BOOSTERS:
Self-titled: CD
Strong, bluesy swamp punk that stands smack dab in the middle of Poison 13, Billy Childish, and The Gun Club. –Jimmy Alvarado (Delta Pop)


SAINTS, THE:
Nothing Is Straight in My House: CD
Yeah, it’s not (I’m) Stranded. Yeah, it’s not Eternally Yours. Yeah, there’s only one original member. But it’s still Chris Bailey, and he still sounds like an eighteen-year-old spending his paycheck on whiskey and cigarettes. The music is fine; it’s not gonna burn your eyebrows off, but it’s pretty good. To me, though, he’s in a league with Joe Strummer and Phil Lynott—his voice is so good that he could sing over pretty much anything and I’d probably like it. I mean, this is the guy who sang “Messin’ with the Kid.” Cut him some slack. –Josh (UFO)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player



·ROSEMARY’S BILLYGOAT
·DEAD TREND
·BUZZCOCKS
·VESTIGES
·INOCULATORS, THE
·Calling All San Diego Punks
·BANGERS AND MASH
·BLACK CLOUD, THE #4
·CAST IN IRON


RZC RECS



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.