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· 1:Patrick Houdek Photo Column - Lost Cross House
· 2:The Backpatches of NYC (Collection 5)
· 3:The Falcon, The Copyrights, Sam Russo live at the Troubadour, July 16, 2016
· 4:#413 with Bianca and Rhea of LA Zine Fest
· 5:Razorcake #93 Now Available, featuring Basement Benders


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Razorcake #93
One Punks Guide to Pinball, by Kayla Greet
Razorcake #92
Spokenest, Gone, Gone, Gone LP
Pinned In Place, Ghostwritten By LP


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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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REATARDS:
Grown Up, Fucked Up: LP
Originally released on Empty back in 1999. Somehow the Reatards managed to evade being on my radar until towards the end, and from all the hype that had built up by that point, I just didn’t want to hear. A mistake on my part. As friends of mine have pointed out to me numerous times, the Reatards were a band I would love. They are right. Had I heard songs like “I Want Sex,” “Sat. Night Suicide,” “Sick When I See,” and “No One Stands Me” when they had come out the first time, my life would be that much better that much sooner. It’s loud and nasty punk rock in all its sonic and ugly glory. Maniacal vocals, twisted guitar, and a drummer who holds it all together—what more could you ask for? A “don’t give a fuck attitude”? Right here! Best illustrated in the hard-charging “Get Outta Our Way.” So f’n great. This edition also comes with the three songs from the Your So Lewd EP.  –Matt Average (Goner, goner-records.com)


RED OWLS, THE:
Do You Feel Any Better?: 12”/CD
Slick-sounding melodic punk from a band including ex-members of The Ataris and Nightmares For A Week. There is no reinventing of the wheel here and I’m struggling to find anything particularly different from which a myriad of bands are doing or have done. Yes it’s easy to listen to and there are some good NOFX-style vocal harmonies and interactions on a couple of songs, but after half a dozen plays the four tracks failed to retain my interest.  –Rich Cocksedge (Paper + Plastick, customer@paperandplastick.com, paperandplastick.com)


REGAL:
Layer World: 7”
Slightly damaged pop from this French outfit. Imagine Gordon Gano meets Dan Melchior for an espresso at a Parisian café and they form a band out of spite. It’s upbeat, offbeat, and tremendously enjoyable.  –Daryl Gussin (Frantic City, franticcity.free.fr)


RIKK AGNEW BAND / SYMBOL SIX:
Split & Stitched: 7”
There’s nothing about Rikk Agnew that hasn’t already been said—or more likely screamed by my fifteen-year-old self while driving around with my friends and listening to the Adolescents. On his first record in ten years—and first record period with the Rikk Agnew Band—the legendary guitarist and the rest of the “Larry Flynt High School Marching Band” throw down two tracks that are so exuberantly aggressive they make me want to risk breaking a hip just to get back into a pit and throw some elbows. The rallying cries of “We insist on having fun” on “Screaming Fist” are, indeed, a hell of a lot of fun, and the menacing bass line leading into “Cosmetic Plague” feels like coming home. Residing on side B are two live tracks from rock’n’roll old timers Symbol Six. “Faith Machine” swings a bit, but “Viva” drives it the fuck home with some serious business shredding and an undeniable bat-out-of-hell momentum, and vocalist Eric Leach howls “Los Angeles” in a way that makes me nostalgic for all the cocaine I never did.  –Kelley O’Death (Jailhouse, info@jailhouserecords.com, jailhouserecords.com)


RIZZOS, THE:
Worse Things: CS
Very pretty vocals highlight this assemblage of mildly aggressive pop songs from Brooklyn’s Rizzos. It’s hard to ignore a voice as potent as the lead singer’s, and I am certain that these tracks wouldn’t be nearly as interesting otherwise. There’s something to be said for a distinct voice, which is what The Rizzos will be remembered for. There are certainly worse things than Worse Things, Greasereferences or not.  –Art Ettinger (King Pizza, kingpizzarecords.bandcamp.com)


ROTTEN MIND:
I’m Alone Even with You: CD
Swedish punk rock that is right up my alley (could it be my Swedish ancestry?). It’s rough and catchy with lots of guitars and raw vocals. I imagine seeing them playing in a cold, concrete basement with the air filled with steam, beer, and electricity. These guys have something going on that I really like. Keep it up my Swedish brothers! I look forward to hearing more.  –ty (Lövely, LLYrecords.com)


ROTUNDA:
Spitting Feathers: CD
Taken at face value, the street punk art on their CD cover sums it up pretty well. That might sound like a dis, but this is straight street punk, a little Clash pop, with metallic, hard rock guitar. Birmingham band Rotunda is a mix of Rancid and Clash, with an amateurish but heartfelt sound. Take it or leave it. Something to stomp your boots and tweak your suspenders to while guzzling whiskey in some dark, dank, graffiti-filled concrete basement.  –Camylle Reynolds (Can’t Shine Shit)


RUBY BUFF:
Insufficient Funs: CS
Holy power pop, Batman! Jangly and catchy, Ruby Buff’s music is fun and dancey without losing its edge. While tracks like “Bike” and “Judee” are pure, unadulterated singalong joy, the guitar on “Totally Down” and swagger of the verses on “Landmine” reveal some underlying reverence for classic punk rock. “Single Livin’” is a short and sweet love ballad dedicated to riding bikes and “Double Livin’” introduces a subtle, ‘60s throwback doo wop vibe that I didn’t realize I had needed all along until it arrived on the final track. Insufficient Funs is the perfect soundtrack for winding your single speed through the city on a sunny spring day.  –Kelley O’Death (Self-released)


RUBY BUFF:
Self-titled: CS
Catchy but weak power-pop-esque rock music (or self-described “off-brand”) from Philadelphia. This would be better with stronger vocals and prominent lead guitar lines to break up the monotony of the song structures. The style shifts to slightly-more-aggressive on “Deep in Your Head,” channeling a little bit more of a punk vibe (à la a less-deranged Spits). This isn’t a bad release, but it’s definitely a document of a band in their infancy. The vocal melodies on “The Unforgiveable Act of Living” reminds me of early Foo Fighters, and I’m not sure from the context whether this band would take that as a compliment or an insult.  –Ian Wise (rubybuff.bandcamp.com)


SAID GUN:
Control: LP
From the name of the band I was expecting something like Embrace, which is where their name comes from. However, this is very poppy punk. It took me a few listens to get past the fact that they are not a mid-’80s D.C.-hardcore-inspired band. Once I accepted that, I found this record to be one that grows on you more and more, revealing its depth and sonic power on each listen. Stylistically, they remind me of Jawbreaker, Canadian Rifle, Superchunk, late period Hüsker Dü (in the guitar sound), and Teenage Cool Kids. They don’t exactly sound like those bands, but if you like those bands, you will more than likely like these guys. This is far better than that 1990s crapola pop punk sound that was ubiquitous. It is more good-time music than dour protest music. If that’s a good thing or bad thing depends on how far that stick up your ass is lodged. The songs are catchy as hell without being sappy. The lead and backing vocals are pretty damn good and serve the music well. It’s the kind of music I would imagine being on a mix tape you would listen to on the way to your favorite lake in the summer. I like how the tempo builds and changes in “Pray the Gay Out.” The wall of guitar that comes in at the end of “Consequence of Caring” is so damn good! Crank it up and lose yourself in the sound. There’s a lot of texture in these songs. The pacing and sequencing is perfect. Well worth picking up. I like, I like...  –Matt Average (Said Gun, saidgun.bandcamp.com)


SCUMRAID:
Rip Up: 7”
The back cover of this 7” depicts a chainsaw ripping through a Marshall cab. It’s the perfect visual interpretation for what this sounds like. Nothing I can write will better describe the sound of this record than that. But… fast crusty hardcore of the Discharge variety, but far less tuneful and apparently recorded on an iphone. Uh, punx? Lyric sheet shows some conceptual value to the message at least.  –Chad Williams (Iron Lung, lifeironlungdeath.blogspot.com)


SEA OF STORMS:
Dead Weight: LP
There was a time in the early 2000s when bands like Rise Against and Alkaline Trio were riding the waves of success and you couldn’t help but hear their names mentioned whenever someone was gushing about their favorite new “punk” bands. Well, I wasn’t sold on either band then and the style they helped popularize is still lost on me now. Sea Of Storms—for all of their heartfelt singing and layers upon layers of harmony and melody—just don’t do it for me. I’d recommend this to fans of Iron Chic, Dopamines, and the like, but even then I’d feel like I was being facetious.  –Juan Espinosa (Self Aware, selfawarerecords.com / Tor Johnson, torjohnsonrecords.com)


SECRET LOVER:
Self-titled: LP
After only a cursory glance at the track list of Secret Lover’s self-titled LP, it becomes apparent that the self-described “spooky psychedelic pop wizards” have a healthy sense of humor, but as the album’s first track “Sometimes My Wine Becomes My Lover” settles into its ‘60s-girl-group shimmy, it becomes evident that they also have a whole lot of heart. Lead vocalist Sally Horowitz’s assertive vibrato is reminiscent of a more amiable Grace Slick, but her voice possesses a surprising diversity, lighting the way as the album travels through every notable genre of the ‘60s and ‘70s. With twelve tracks clocking in at just over thirty minutes, Secret Lover satisfies with its feel-good tunes without overstaying its welcome.  –Kelley O’Death (Sister Cylinder, sistercylinder.bigcartel.com)


SEWERS:
Weight: LP
Repetitive and uninspired noise pop from Australia. I hear a lot of Fan Death Records in their sound, as well as some of the noisier aspects of the Nirvana catalog. There’s a pop sensibility to the execution, but there are no real hooks. While there are good things going on with the record, the band’s unwillingness to fully commit to anything (as in, full-out noise or true pop structure) shows a band that is taking too many steps to get to where they want to be, making it a chore for the listener to follow along. The lyrics meander but never find a cohesive point. I wouldn’t mind it so much if there wasn’t an overwhelming “cool guy” smarmy attitude around the whole thing (including a hype sticker that touts it as the “greatest noise punk record of recent years”). Pass.  –Ian Wise (Homeless)


SHARK SANDWICH:
Self-titled: CS
I was expecting Burger-esque garage worship based off the album art, but this is some frenzied shit. Frantic hardcore. You got your boom-bap-boom and your chicken squawk vocals and lurching structures and it’s just tinny as all hell, man. Totally coulda come out on 625 or Sound Pollution back in the day and would’ve fit right in. Not bad.  –keith (Corndog Club, corndogclub.storevny.com)


SHEARING PINX:
Poison Hands: LP
Calling these cats noisy is about as big an understatement as saying the food at Tommy’s is greasy (for those outside of California, Tommy’s is an infamous burger chain best known for dousing everything on their menu with a quasi-chili that leaves everything it comes in contact with a slippery electric-orange hue that’ll make your arteries howl in horror). There’s little in the way of sonic dynamics other than some songs are more structured than others. While one starts to hope for even the briefest respite to all the bludgeoning around the mid-way point, there is nonetheless something oddly catchy buried in places, seemingly emanating from the rhythm section, where the bass and drums occasionally lock in and give the screeching guitar wiping a solid backbone. There is a method to the skronk, and just when you think you’ve got ‘em all sussed out, they hit you with a twenty-plus minute opus of mostly improvised noisemongering. Like Tommy’s, I’m sure there are many who will hate it and dismiss it as crap, but for some of us, this makes a fine dinner.  –jimmy (Gilgongo, gilgongorecords.com)


SHUT UP, STUPID:
Self-titled: CS

My tape player effectively ate the shit out of this cassette after a couple listens. The trials and tribulations of the cassette tape. Sigh. Shut Up, Stupid is a musical chairs of sorts (forgive my un-punk but apt analogy) with members of RAD switching it up with Charles Albright on lead vocals, Lori on drums, and

Craig on bass. Speaking of Charles Albright (this time the band), Adam who plays bass for said band is on bass. Are you following? They dabble in late ‘70s Ramones, with a whole lot of screamy Charles Albright, fast RAD riffs, and DRI pit build up and breakdowns. Make sense? Anybody familiar with the Sacramento punk scene will understand this clear as day. If you’re lucky you might actually catch a show or two, because this amalgamation might last as long as my cassette.  –Camylle Reynolds (SAC)


SKEPTICS:
Open Sea: 10”
More scrawly psych/garage from a French outfit I’ve always suspected of being soft on Surrealistic Pillow. I prefer the faster-paced, punker stuff like “StoneCity” to the slower, heavier numbers like “T.V. Wizard,” but I haven’t taken acid since 1990 so consider the source. BEST SONG: “Hole in the Ground” BEST SONG TITLE: “Mole People” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The matrix number “037” has the little cross-bar in the “7.”  –norb (Frantic City, franticcity.free.fr)


SKULLCRACK:
Cut It Down: 7”
I’m at a point in my life where songs about growing up and weighing the past against the present really resonate with me. More and more, I lock into songs that struggle with the day-to-day, feet-on-the-ground shit that I find rolling around in my brain as I close in on forty. I’m not as likely to get a kick out of songs about smashing the system or whatever, but I still want that sound. I still want that rage. I still want hardcore. Skullcrack gives it to me, with lyrics like these: “Suburban menace, hopping fences, and we’re running wild/ with an old soul and the heart of a child/ I don’t yearn for those days or try to resist the change/ Not trying to stay the same, only just maintain.”  –mp (Adios Motherfucker, skullcrackhc.bandcamp.com)


SLAYER:
Repentless: CD/LP
Repentless is Slayer’s first album without producer Rick Rubin and his American Records label. However, that hasn’t caused the band to change their style. It’s still what you’d expect from them: a nice mix of slower, darker tunes (“When the Stillness Comes”) and faster tracks, (“Repentless”). As drummer extraordinaire Dave Lombardo left the band, Slayer has gone back to their 1990s drummer Paul Bostaph. He’s not quite as good as his predecessor, especially with a lack of double bass in parts where it might add some more power to Slayer’s sound. Also missing is guitarist Jeff Hanneman’s nimble guitar playing and punk influence. Kerry King does a good job at channeling his sound here and there, but it would’ve been cool to see what Hanneman could’ve done with some of these songs. His lyrics would also be welcome as I always appreciated his take on serial killers and murder (not sure what that says about me, but whatever). For what it’s worth, King’s lyrics don’t seem as juvenile as they have on past albums and it’s not all about how much he hates Christianity (although there is some of that onRepentless). What you’re getting on these twelve songs is pretty par for the Slayer course. It’s good thrash with some fine guitar solos and heavy riffs. It’s not quite as good as their last album World Painted Blood, but there’s proof here that Slayer still has retained some of that mojo and is able to channel their past sound to continue to create heavy, credible songs.  –kurt (Nuclear Blast)


SLOANE PETERSON:
Why Go Out?: LP
New pressing of Sloane Peterson’s 2011 release. It could be argued that just as many kids picked up instruments and formed bands after Nirvana broke in ‘92, many did the same after the first releases from Weezer and D4 in ‘94. Sloane Peterson bobs along like heavy “Buddy Holly” asking “Noble Stabbings!!” to the sock hop. Check the right, left, right hooks of “Recover,” “Tallahassee,” and “Bridges” and see if you’re not knocked unconscious by sugary/bitter punk goodness. I suppose many Razorcakereaders have already experienced Why Go Out?, maybe even hanging with best friends while sipping forties next to the train tracks. But any that haven’t, a repress in a boss hand-screened cover is a great excuse to make that memory.  –Matt Seward (Dead Broke, deadbrokerecords.com)


SOUND REASONS, THE:
Till the End of Time: CS
This is the cassette version of the new three-song 7” from this L.A. outfit that seeks to emulate 1960s garage rock as authentically as possible. Is it a silly idea to try to sound like pre-punk 1960s garage in 2015? Maybe. But Sound Reasons a.) pulls it off and b.) is able to do so while simultaneously writing new, catchy songs that defy a specific time period. Do we need a three-song cassette release, though? The answer is unequivocally yes. Major kudos goes to Burger Records for churning out another fantastic cassette. –Art Ettinger (Burger)


SOUND4SOUND:
Making the Right Ear Jealous: CS
Sound4Sound is hitting all the right buttons. This could be a long-lost classic from 1985, my friends’ awesome demo from 1996, or what it actually is: a bunch of middle-aged scene vets from Miami playing tough, timeless hardcore that touches on Poison Idea and early NYHC. Playing hardcore in your forties makes sense. You can chug some beers in the garage, blow off your deep-seated anger at the world, and shave your head to hide the bald spot. Can I come hang out, dudes? Twelve-track tape including theRat Bastard EP, two demos, and a previously unreleased song.  –CT Terry (sound4sound.bandcamp.com)


SPAM JAVELIN:
How Can You Die When You’re Already Dead?: CDEP
Spam Javelin make hardcore punk the way it should be made: short, fast, and angry as fuck! Led by U.K. punk veteran Neil Crud on guitar and vocals, the band pulls no punches musically or lyrically. Musically, there’s a bit of a crossover vibe at points that would make “Fast” Eddie Clarke and Lemmy Kilmister proud, especially on the title track. (It’s sure to inspire furious dancing both on the dancefloor in front of the stage and at home in front of the stereo.) Lyrically, Spam Javelin takes on just about everything that Neil Crud is currently pissed at—from jerks with top knots, to “Ghetto Scum,” to other people’s wives—not much escapes his wrath. Spam Javelin also vie for the award for the most “fucks” dropped on a single CD, and not just on tracks like “Fuck Off,” “Fuck Your Wife,” and “Fucking Jerks.” Don’t take this to be a complaint, just a statement of fucking fact. You’ll likely be too busy moshing to notice; just don’t play this around your boss, or your mom. –Paul J. Comeau (Link2Wales, link2wales.co.uk)


SPRAY PAINT:
Punters on a Barge: LP
Their guitarist manages to get a pretty unique sound to his twanger here—at times it almost sounds like a large, steely marble being bounced around inside a large metallic tube. Not a sound one comes across too often since Sonic Youth decided to write pop songs. This is noise rock that falls on the no wave end of the spectrum; rhythmic—often hypnotic in the same way listening to machines work is—and yet fully engaging throughout. –jimmy (Homeless)


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