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Razorcake #84
Tim Version, Ordinary Life LP + bonus 7"
Radon, 28 LP
Zisk #25
Razorcake #83


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Record Reviews

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VERBAL ABUSE:
Just an American Band: LP
Don’t have this yet? You gotta get it. I guarantee this will be a permanent part of your collection. One you will put on the turntable in another forty years and get the same rush you did as the first time you listened to it. This is hardcore punk from San Francisco 1983, featuring Nicki Sicki (from one of my all time favorite bands, Sick Pleasure) on vocals. This is the sound that had Okies like me dreaming of “the good life” in California. Pure hardcore that is dirty and dangerous-sounding, and it makes you feel alive and invincible. Back when bands lived it and breathed it. The songs are fast and yet catchy and tuneful without being corny or wimpy. The crashing tempo of “I Don’t Need It” is great, as well as the way Nicki Sicki delivers the lyric, “You’re Shit!” in “Verbal Abuse.” Such a great album.  –Matt Average (Beer City)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Without Kibou There Is Nothing Vol. 2: 7”
Kibou Records has been pumping vinyl and tapes out of England since 2011. Along the way, they’ve been using the Without Kibou There Is Nothing series as a twelve-minute showcase for groups from across the land. In part two of the series, the A-Side features heavier acts like grind group Social Rut’s 40-second pummel, “Wreck / Logic,” and hardcore band Albion’s “Black Charcoal Lungs,” which has an evil guitar hook pulsing out some lovely, dirty melody: a little Gallows, a little Pixies—looks bad on paper but tastes great. The satisfyingly bizarre Autopsy Boys make Side-B appreciably weirder, blending post-punk with synth effects, holding the cheese, and featuring a frontman who sounds like a sort of Zero Boys’ Paul Mahern if he were singing in 2079 instead of 1979. Or, you know, Robocop punk. The steady pop beat of Second In Line close out the EP with a list song recalling dead celebrities—”Walt Disney is Dead…/lots of Lassies are dead”— human and otherwise. All side, a nice tour of an EP. Now get on your baby brother’s computer and do the Google math— £4 is only $6.72, you can afford that. Optional white vinyl and included digital download.  –Jim Joyce (Kibou)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
To Live a Lie Records Volume II: LP
Close to thirty tracks of some of the best current grind and powerviolence bands going right now. The track listing is a good mix of well-known bands of the genre (Weekend Nachos, Sick/Tired, etc.) and some relatively unknown bands that are good (and lucky?) enough to warrant inclusion on the disc. It’s definitely a good representation of the scene and serves well as a go-to educational piece for people trying to get a crash course in the scene, but for those of us that follow the grind/PV scene there are still plenty of good reasons to pick this thing up (last recording by Vaccine and the first vinyl appearance of Alabama’s Slave are worth the price alone). To Live A Lie are already at the top of extreme hardcore scene and this document is another welcome addition to their growing catalog of top-notch records.  –Ian Wise (To Live A Lie)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Influence: A Tribute to Big Boys: LP
A long-overdue tribute record to one of the most prolific punk bands of our time. The Big Boys mean a whole lot to a whole lot of people and reading the introductions submitted from nearly every band gives you even more insight into just how powerful their music is even after all these years since their inactivity and the untimely passing of vocalist Randy “Biscuit” Turner. I’d like to start off by complimenting the astonishingly beautiful album artwork courtesy of Big Boys guitarist Tim Kerr. This particular copy is one of the limited versions with spray paint stenciled art and on coke bottle-colored vinyl. The album as a whole is completely listenable from start to finish without a single disappointing / mangling moment to be heard. Toys That Kill lead off the festivities and give “Nervous” a shot in the arm with their off-kilter San Pedro style stomp. Night Birds swoop down from Jersey and super-charge their version of “Wise Up.” Mind Spiders update the television viewing audiences’ favorites while adding some weirdo synth into their rendition of “TV.” Other personal favorites include, but are not limited to, Spokenest, Drunk Injuns, Tight Lips, The Nervous, Low Culture, and Riverboat Gamblers with their superb take on perhaps the most beautifully melancholy Big Boys song “Sound on Sound.” Gary Floyd (The Dicks frontman, longtime friend, and co-performer) provides some touching and heartfelt words for Biscuit and for the Big Boys, in general as a band, whose time and place happenstance simply cannot and will not be replicated. Their existence as a live act is something that very few fortunate souls can vividly recall. For the rest of us, there’s stories and online video footage to keep us happy and now there’s also this record to remind us that we’re all in this together and in great company as fans, admirers, and artists. Fun, fun, and more fucking fun! Biscuit would be proud.  –Juan Espinosa (Stiff Hombre)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Emotional Response Box of Tricks: 5 x 7”EP
What can I say about this truly rad indie box set of five colored vinyl EPs, full of stickers, badges, and pins from Emotional Response? It’s like Christmas. But through the eyes of a bushytailed-big-eyed youngster, and not the cynical thirty-something asshole-humbug I’ve become. Records can have that effect on me. Box stars Kickback$, The Safe Distance, Hulaboy, Cheap Red, Thee Headless Kings, and Shindaggers. Indie darlings Stewart Anderson and Jen Turrell from Boyracer make their appearance on almost all five EPs. What’s more prolific than an English man in the desert? Nothing. Only one hundred available; possibly sold out by the time you get wind of this. If not, get it.  –Camylle Reynolds (Emotional Response)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Aperiodic, Mala In Se, Joe 4, Knife The Symphony: 2 x 7”
Whoa! This is a complete stinker. It has this weird 1990s nostalgia about it, where the record is like a sampler of some of the many sounds of that bygone decade. You have a band like Joe 4, who sound like they really like Shellac, but are so blinded in their fandom, they don’t quite realize that one of the reason Shellac was a good band was because they were original. Knife The Symphony are bland “post hardcore” wanking. Mala In Se remind me of all the bands that clogged up the first few years of the Ebullition mail order catalog, the kind of records that take up a lot of space in today’s record cut out bins. Aperiodic want to push at the constraints, and even if they were to be successful, who would notice?  –Matt Average (Phratry)


VÅNNA INGET:
Ingen Botten: LP
My punk jadedness to polished music left me unprepared for the ghostlike precision of each haunting note on Ingen Botten. I’m glad that I don’t understand a bit of Swedish (although I was tempted to read some butchered Google translations), because I’m better able to appreciate Karolina Engdahl’s sorrowful crooning. The fast songs are post-punk infused power pop, like Red Dons, complete with hi-hat-driven dance beats and bold choruses that seductively lick your eardrums. But with a decisive swoop, Vånna Inget dives into darker melodies instilled with the goth flair of Siouxsie And The Banshees. Karolina beckons alongside the brooding organ which is never sugary. Instead, the keys drip into doom-y beats while the restrained guitars reverberate over the deliberate, ambling bass lines. It comes as no surprise that these folks were nominated for a Swedish Grammy, as this album is utterly high drama: bold, distinct, grandiose. Are the Grammys worth even a smidgen of interest? Nope. But Vånna Inget do deserve tons of kudos for this exceptionally crafted LP. Recommended.  –Sean Arenas (Man In Decline)


VANILLA MUFFINS:
The Triumph of Sugar Oi!: CD
Another “best of” (this makes five, by my count) from these cats, this time with a large chunk of tunes from their The Drug Is Football LP joining the lineup with older fare. Seems a bit overkill, yes, but I reckon if you’re looking for a quick taste of what they do, and the other four collections are unavailable, this’ll do nicely. Here, you get fourteen tracks of their “sugar oi” sound—heaping piles of pop-laden punk ditties owing more to Slade than Last Resort, with full-ring guitars aplenty and huge, anthemic hooks just a-dripping off the disc. Vanilla Muffins have long been a guilty pleasure of mine, and this does nothing to diminish that in any way.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Spirit Of The Streets)


UNDERCLASS U.K.:
Not in My Name: CD
These guys started in the ‘80s but went on a massive hiatus after their guitar player got arrested on drugs charges. They’re from Barking, the same place that hatched Billy Bragg. The lyrics have the same class-conscious—if much less poetic—outlook on life. The music is what you’d expect from a band with U.K. in their name—mid-tempo street punk a la U.K. Subs or Chaos U.K. (Oh wait, there’s Chameleons U.K. and The Mission U.K., too. This band is nothing like that.) The vocals are rawer on some tracks, which set them apart from the rest of the street punk pack. On other tracks, there is some kind of weird effect applied which makes them sound muddy. Not so fast but plenty furious, this is the perfect soundtrack for plotting your next act of civil disobedience.  –Lisa Weiss (Punk Lives Live)


TV FREAKS:
Leeches: 7”
Holy. Fucking. Shit. Did I just get rammed into by a truck? Whereas TV Freaksʼ last record was at least somewhat polished sounding, this 7” is just pure disgusting, spit in your eyeballs filth. Leeches sounds like what insanity feels like: the vocals intense shouts, the guitars deranged and the drums flailing and crashing. These three tracks are guaranteed to scare your parents, even if they’re the hip ones who buy fair-trade coffee and listen to the morning show on campus radio. If you thought Strange Attractor was the only Canadian outfit making maniacal punk noise, you need to turn your knob onto TV Freaks, one of the few punk bands making the genre a fucking threat again. A.  –Alanna Why (Hosehead)


TSUNAMIS, THEE:
Delirium and Dark Waters: 7”
Seriously awesome female lo-fi, garagey surf rock with lots of reverb. The first track opens with a dark and heavy bass rumbling in for a measure or two and is quickly joined by twangy, bright guitar and high-pitched squeals. The drums are tight, controlled, and way mellow compared to the smorgasbord of chaotic sounds from the rest of the band. Thee Headcoatees meets The Cramps with four songs about haunted houses, hanging at the swamp, spell casters, and psycho lovers that will creepy crawl right into your head. For a three piece band, they sound incredibly full and while the riffs used are pretty common in surf rock, they’re not normally played at this speed and with such frantic excitement. Thee Tsunamis are ‘60s mod, surf, and horror punk all at once and they manage to make all their elements extremely enjoyable.  –Kayla Greet (Magnetic South)


TRUBBEL:
Gör Om Gör Rätt: 7”
The Swedes sure have a way of nailing the sounds of U.S. rock’n’roll and yet making it their own. Trubbel plays catchy, straight-up Chuck Berry via Johnny Thunders sassy punk rock that sounds a lot like fellow Swedes Knugen Faller with lower register male vocals but the same amount of sass. My gut tells me that Trubbel likely puts on one hell of a live show, too.  –Dave Williams (Alleycat)


TERMINUS:
Going Nowhere Fast: CD
Reissue of a 1990 record from this English band, a band I’ve never heard before and a fascinating listen. Musically, it covers a lot of territory, from speedy hardcore to slow, dark, doomy punk, to melodic mid-tempo punk, all with a constant undercurrent of classic crust. Oh, and some very un-technical metal solos. There’s a sprawling, epic nature to this very raw record that adds some weight to the very political lyrical content, sung with a lead vocal that’s sort of The Baron-meets-Dave Vanian. Sounds like a mix of various recording sessions, and they needed to use an original vinyl copy to create this reissue, so sound quality is average, but definitely does not detract from the content whatsoever. A nice surprise of a record and something I’d seek out a vinyl copy of if it wasn’t so rare. Fans of bands from Amebix to Chron Gen: get this now.  –Chad Williams (Bosstuneage Retro)


TEENGENERATE:
Five Covers: 7”
Cover projects can be throwaway vinyl at times, but Teengenerate bring their blazing train wreck speed to DMZ’s “Boy from Nowhere,” The Real Kids’ “She’s Alright,” and The Pagans’ “And Change.” Good taste and crowd pleasers don’t always translate to vinyl, but these three tracks create serious rattlehead in the comfort of your own home. The Queer’s “Kicked out of Webelos” and an Elvis cover are only nominal by Teengenerate standards. These tracks are taken from nineteen-year-old demos and show the raw power of a band that everyone should kneel before.  –Billups Allen (Crypt)


TANKIFIED:
Volume I: CD
If you like your generic SoCal-style punk rock with a generous dose of arena hair metal, then run—don’t walk—to get this record. Me, I’m gonna stay where I am. There is cowbell. Lots of it. Guitar solos and effect pedals, oh my! Remember that time Green Day covered The Scorpions? This is like The Scorpions covering Green Day. Well, not even The Scorpions—more like Dokken. If Wal-Mart went into the business of opening dive bars, these guys would be the house band.  –Lisa Weiss (Mystery School)


SUICIDE SYNDICATE:
In It for Life: LP
Suicide Syndicate sounds like a lot of bands. The first track is almost a complete AC/DC ripoff. I hear Rancid and Motörhead and The Misfits. More than anything, it seems that Suicide Syndicate wants you to know that they are tough. Even if their songs sound tired and repetitive, Suicide Syndicate play to say, “Fuck that weak shit,” which just happens to be the title of track two, side two. When will someone say, “Fuck that tough-guy shit”? Clichés are clichés for a reason, I suppose.  –John Mule (Switchlight)


SUBURBAN MUTILATION:
The Opera Ain’t Over Til the Fat Lady Sings: CD
Fuggin’ awesome! This is the first time I’ve listened to this, despite knowing about this band for the past thirty years. Why it took me this long, I have no idea. Maybe if I had heard this back then, my life would be better, and maybe I would have more friends, and a better job. Whatever the case, this is highly recommended, and maybe even essential. Originally released in 1984, and featuring Rev. Nørb of Sick Teen zine (and later Razorcake), these guys cranked out some intense hardcore punk that definitely didn’t take itself seriously, but still has a sonic punch. The guitar sounds like hell, the vocals are gravelly and raspy, with the drums pounding and thundering underneath. The songs range from super fast to more mid-tempo fare. And the lyrics are pretty good as well. Teen angst with a humorous edge. “Apathy” and “I Reject U” may become your anthems. There’s a ton of bonus material on here as well. Along with the original seventeen-song LP, there are thirty tracks of recordings done in basements and garages, varying in quality, but the energy comes through loud and clear. This stuff is so good, and so different than Boris The Sprinkler? Who saw that coming?  –Matt Average (Beer City)


SUBURBAN MOMS:
Turning Schools into Stone: 7”EP
Suburban Moms comes out with their latest 7”, which I have to say is quite good, despite their awful band name and bleak cover. At least it caught my curiosity? A-side’s “Turning Schools into Stone” is very similar in sound to Synthetic ID with a melodic post-punk guitar, propelling beat, and jumping bass line. Vocals are a-melodic, almost used as percussion, punctuated from the ebb and flow of guitar. It’s good. Really good. B-side features “Tolerating Intolerance,” less catchy, tinges of Adolescence, more straight- ahead ‘80s early punk, vocals a bit more screechy. Keep A-side on replay.  –Camylle Reynolds (Pashtone/Plant Bullshit)


STREGESTI:
Self-titled: CD
Super solid Polish crust/hardcore. Dueling female/male vocals scream and growl their way through thoughtfully written and thoughtfully translated lyrics. The packaging is pretty special, and from what little I could find out about the band, was handmade by them. Silk-screened cardboard cover and booklet printed on recycled paper; it’s a real labor of love.  –Jackie Rusted (Nikt Nic Nie Wie)


STREET EATERS:
BLOOD::MUSCLES::BONES: LP
There’s something empowering about bands self-releasing their records. Like an employee owned and operated brewery, it just puts a smile on my face. Record labels are as important as ever, it’s just different. Street Eaters kill it on their second proper full-length. The drums stampede in frantic unison while the bass sounds like a meteor shower, but the meteors aren’t burning up in the atmosphere. Hubs of civilization aflame. Chaos reigns. Process that and then add two of the most dynamic and powerful vocalists in punk today. If something gets described as crusty or art-punk, it can be met with reservations, but Street Eaters relentlessly bring those elements (and more!) together in true, devastatingly beautiful harmony.  –Daryl Gussin (Nervous Intent [US] / Contraszt! [Europe])


STRANGLEHOLD:
Trouble: 7”
I suppose that I am destined to write reviews of this band because of our names. I’m okay with that because I really liked their last 7”. Stranglehold is back with another three-song blast of dirty street punk. Musically, Stranglehold reminds me of a mid-tempo Bodies but this time out the singer sounds like she had really upped her cigarette and whiskey intake. Seriously, she is heading into Frankie Stubbs and Lemmy territory. It makes for a tougher sounding record for sure, but I wish there was just a little less gravel in her voice. It’s still a solid record though.  –Ty Stranglehold (Pirates Press)


STRANGE PARTY, THE:
Waste of Flesh / Radio(in)active EP: Cassette
A ton of potential here, what with their tried and true Misfits / SoCal whoa-oh-oh melodic approach. But it feels to me like this is a young band who, over the course of the two EPs on this tape, are spending more time working on their individual parts than listening to each other: there’s often so much going on that the songs don’t have much space to breathe. The last song here, “Angel of Summer,” is the best and most spacious. It’s also the one which sounds the most unrepentantly like ol’ Glenn and co.  –Michael T. Fournier (Pleasant Screams)


STILETTO BOYS:
Liberator: CD
This is the Stiletto Boys third full-length release, but first release in well over a decade. Why the wait? Originally recorded in 2008, the band scrapped the entire album in pursuit of perfection. Finally released in 2013, Liberator is a powerpop masterpiece featuring a spot-on cover of Stiv Bator’s “Not That Way.” But it’s not just fluff; there is some real substance here. Impeccable production, warm fuzzy guitar, and the harmonies... oh the harmonies! This album is the first spring day after a long, shitty winter.  –Jackie Rusted (Zodiac Killer)


STELLAR CORPSES:
Vampire Kiss: 7”
I’m way into the upright bass playing on this record. I don’t know if there’s any virtuosity going on, because I don’t know shit about upright bass. I just know that I hear a lot of psychobilly records with very neutered upright bass, as if they arbitrarily grabbed a jazz band kid, gave him a pompadour, and made him a member of the band without first indoctrinating him in the style. The upright bass playing on this record is a perfect rumbling undercurrent that’s like a knife to the neck, poised to cause serious harm. The rest of the music isn’t too shabby either. It’s nice and malicious. If there’s a weak link, it’s the vocals, which seem too clean and restrained. Needs more howling. Also, it’s probably not fair to call this psychobilly. Some of the tropes are there, but there’s not much of the ‘billy. The band draws just as much from melodic punk and even thrash, particularly on the B-side. It all comes together nicely.  –MP Johnson (Chapter 11)


STARZY SIDA:
Self-titled: CD
Apparently, this is a one-time side project featuring Patyczak on vocals and the band Starzy Singers from Warsaw. Late ‘70s punk seems to be the main influence on these tunes. Everything is played with controlled chaos and it seems to work well. I wish I could tell you more about how this connects with me emotionally, but all the liner notes seem to be in their native tongue. I’d really appreciate an English lyric section on their bandcamp page so I could follow along.  –Sean Koepenick (Nikt Nic Nie Wie)


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