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· 1:A Brief History of Punk in Izhevsk, Russia by Alex Herbert
· 2:Webcomic Wednesdays #131
· 3:#362 with Kurt Morris
· 4:Two New Installments in the Tear A Cognita Series
· 5:Featured Zine Reviews From Issue #86


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Razorcake #87
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My Dad Went to See Some Weird Music and... by Mike Faloon
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Record Reviews

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NIGHT BIRDS:
The Other Side of Darkness: LP
Hardcore that really resonates with me has been made by outcasts. And I don’t mean one-dimensional, “They don’t understand my crew,” looking-for-sponsorship outcasts. I’m talking about people who truly don’t look or fit the part making fast, hard, palpitating music. I’m talking about misfits within misfits, even at the band level, yet they’re all on the same page at the same time, if even just for the length of a record, the duration of a set. They’re all in the same chemistry lab, comic book store, record store, and thrift store for that twenty or so minutes. They draw from obscurity and edges and fringes. Look at old Dead Kennedys, Zero Boys, and Void photos. Look at Out Cold. Regular haircuts. Regular T-shirts. Regular-looking. Not funny-looking. Then listen. It’s what’s trapped inside that’s worth listening to for the long haul. They saved all the weirdness and anger and head ventilation for the music. Night Birds run deep—obvious over—and undercurrents are the surf guitar, the breakneck speed, and the smart lyrics. Inside is melody and Woody Allen references, origami-like guitar leads (fancy cuts, intricate patterns), and a drum that jounces and hollers instead of getting locked like a monkey inside the 4/4 cage. They’re looking at hardcore punk laterally—approaching it from the side—and that sounds so much better than a band you can hear flooring it in a straight line through a suburban cul-de-sac with nowhere else to go. Excellent. –Todd Taylor (Grave Mistake)


NIGHT BEATS:
Self-titled: CD
The Night Beats clearly have a core stored deep in the garage. Piled on top, though, are healthy heaps of psychedelia and surf, which turns what could’ve been just another exercise in faceless ‘60s nostalgia into a moody and sometimes downright swampy excursion into some of rock’s darker corners. Definitely worth the search. –Jimmy Alvarado (Trouble In Mind)


NERVOUS GENDER:
“Gestalt” b/w “Green Tile Floors”: 7”
Both label (Test Tube released 45s by the Zeros and pre-Youth Brigade band The Extremes) and band have deep roots in Los Angeles’s punk scene, and seeing as both haven’t released much in a loooooooong time, this also signifies a return to form for both. Both songs date back to 1979, when Nervous Gender was wreaking havoc on unsuspecting punk audiences, but the versions presented here were recorded in late 2009 with most of the founding members in attendance (Gerardo Velasquez passed away in the early 1990s). If you’re thinkin’ there is no way in hell this could hold a candle to previous classics like the Music From Hell LP and their tracks on the Live at Target compilation, rest assured the tunes here showcase a group that has not softened a whit with age. Time, experience, and three decades of technological advances may have allowed them to organize the parts a wee bit better, but the chaos, flailing synthesizers, and blunt vitriol of their attack remain in full display both on wax and live, as those who have seen their recent performances can attest. They remain one of the best and most criminally overlooked bands Los Angeles has ever produced, and this release is fan-fucking-tastic. Here’s hoping a full-length isn’t too far behind this. –Jimmy Alvarado (Test Tube, testtuberecords.com)


NEGATIVE LIFESTYLE:
Panic: EP
This trio from Sweden delivers the goods in short blasts of raw and stripped-down, tuneful hardcore punk. There are a few thrashers on here (“M.B.D.,” “New Solutions,” “No Random Signals,” and the title track), but the rest are a touch moodier—and have a little more going on in the structure—from mid to quick tempos, bass-driven breaks, and guitars that come in and out. The whole record is steeped in urgency, which is really noticeable in the vocals (that remind me of Claude Bessy), that have a dry and desperate sound that switches between shouted and spoken. While there are some fast ragers on here, I find the slightly slower songs like “Trying to Fit In,” “Radio Silence,” and “Reading to Avoid Thinking” stand out more and stay with me later throughout the day. Don’t hesitate in picking this one up. –Matt Average (Deranged, derangedrecords.com)


NATO COLES AND THE BLUE DIAMOND BAND / KING FRIDAY:
Split!!: 7”
Nato Coles: I’m familiar with his work, having done brief tours with the Modern Machines and Used Kids. The Blue Diamond Band is the next step in the timeline of the aforementioned bands, in that it’s really starting to channel DIY punk through the Bruce Springsteen/Tom Petty/classic rock’n’roll singer/songwriter filter, as opposed to vice versa. It threw me for a sec, because it was labeled as 33 (which bugs me on 7”s), but thought “this sounds pretty weird for Nate” and, sure enough, it’s 45. But the songs are great, and if there’s any justice, an incarnation of the Blue Diamond Band will end up with a residency somewhere in Vegas (or some other small desert casino town, probably to Nate’s liking). King Friday: Never heard of them before this, even though some research leads me to believe they’ve been around for a long time, but I like Florida. The whole aesthetic of the record looks like an old Lookout release, and this band kind of reminds me of a DIY punk Superchunk, with pretty awesome mid-tempo rock with the slightest little guitar intricacies. Plus, the singing reminds me of a Florida version of Mac from Superchunk, which I don’t know how to describe, but who cares? It means it’s good. Great split all around. –Joe Evans III (ADD)


NAKED AGGRESSION / ALL OR NOTHING H.C.:
Split: CD
Despite the fact that they’ve been around more than twenty years and they’re originally from Wisconsin, my home state, I’ve never actually listened to Naked Aggression. Oops. Thoughtful and intense hardcore poking at the same problems hardcore’s been poking at since old times, albeit with a sharper stick than usual. If you haven’t heard them yet either, now’s a good chance to remedy that problem, especially since they’re paired up with the like-minded All Or Nothing H.C. on this split. –MP Johnson (On The Rag)


MOTHER’S CHILDREN:
Are You Tough Enough?: 12” EP
A six-song follow-up to their debut record, Ottawa’s finest return with a great release. They actually remind me of the Minneapolis’s Crash Kids a bit (which is a good thing, trust me). I like “Sabre Tooth” and “What’s Your Problem” the best here. There is a reason Paul Collins brought these guys on tour with them. They simply rock, in the best tradition of 20/20 or The Plimsouls. Pick this up and you will be bopping along when you pick up your burger and strawberry milkshake at your local fast food joint. Yum. –Sean Koepenick (Taken By Surprise)


MINUTEMEN / SACCHARINE TRUST:
Split: 7”EP
It’s very goddamned hard to speak of the stuff on here, because my first inclination is to just gush like some simp fan boy about how truly fuggin’ fabulous these bands were and how truly fuggin’ mandatory a purchase this is. I mean, seriously, both took the Southern California hardcore template that was barely being forged at the time these tracks were being recorded, roughly 1980-83, and promptly turned the whole endeavor on its head with liberal doses of funk, groove-mongering, and free jazz. You get three songs from each here, all previously released, but all culled from the now-obscure Chunks, Cracks in the Sidewalk, Life Is Ugly So Why Not Kill Yourself and Life Is Beautiful So Why Not Eat Health Foods classic punk compilations, which means you’d have a fucker of a time finding ‘em separately and your wallet would take a severe beating the minute you attempted to procure them. Pettibon and Baiza art, lyric sheet, and some of the best music to come out of the United States—you really cannot ask for more. –Jimmy Alvarado (Water Under The Bridge)


MIKE KROL:
I Hate Jazz: 10”
Whoa, whoa, whoa. Holy moly. First record I can think of in recent memory that came from a band that I’ve never heard of that—as soon as I drop the needle on the record—it blows me away immediately. Internet searches for Mike Krol provide little information other than that he played drums in a couple bands in Wisconsin and Connecticut and makes his living doing graphic design. The design element comes through clearly, as the artwork is quite sharp, with the colors and fonts used uniformly throughout the record, front and back, inside and out. It looks like it could be an early Talking Heads record. Musically, it starts off with a little garagey jingle jangle of the guitar, but then warmly played keyboards and naïf-like vocals come in, and those jingle jangle guitars turn in to rich, full, smartly tuned and timed thrashes and all of a sudden shards of post-punk and indie rock start flying everywhere and it all kind of adds up to something like Atom And His Package with a full band. This is a winner, easily the MVP of the new batch of review materials. White vinyl, hand-numbered, and comes with download card. –Jeff Proctor (Counter Counter Culture)


MIGHTY MIDGETS / REVENGE OF THE PSYCHOTRONIC MAN / FIST OF THE NORTHSTAR / BROKE:
Four Band Split: CD
Mighty Midgets: Vaguely technical, melodic hardcore that’s kind of like A Wilhelm Scream, but from Sweden. Revenge of the Psychotronic Man: The band that I picked this CD up for. These guys are awesome. Rowdy-sounding British dudes playing really fast with just enough appreciation for melody to hold things together. I loved their Make Pigs Smoke album from a while back, and this delivers more of the same. Think of these guys as the burlier second coming of Snuff. Fist Of The North Star: Dudes from Nashville who turn in four tracks of melodic hardcore/skatepunk. Pretty good, but it goes by in a blur of double picking and harmonics due to being on the back half of the CD. Broken Aris: This Swedish band sounds exactly like early Rise Against, but with a really, really distracting singer. Think if Feargal Sharkey (Undertones) took a hit of helium and then tried to sing songs from Revolutions Per Minute. Yes, it sounds really weird. –Adrian Salas (Stik Man/ 5 Feet Under /TNS)


MIDWEST BEAT, THE:
Gone Not Lost: LP
Not sure if this came out before or after their recent Back to Mono 7”. Midwest Beat is tight as hell but manage to sound like a shambolic, sing-a-long basement party band. I still need to see ‘em live. I don’t know what to call their sound—countrified power pop? Something that could only come from the Midwest. There are lots of layers on this album and I hear more each listen—great vocal harmonies and guitar melodies. There’s nary a second to breathe between songs, keeping the energy high. If rock’n’roll was a three-course dinner, I’d pair Midwest Beat with Box Elders and Goodnight Loving. –Sal Lucci (Dusty Medical)


MIDWEST BEAT, THE:
Back to Mono: 7” EP
So much emphasis has been put on the “budget rock” end of the ‘60s influence thang that when something like this comes along it’s almost like a breath of fresh air. Four tunes of smart, jangly stuff that owe as much to the Paisley Underground bands of the ‘80s as the psychedelic groove merchants of the ‘60s. Catchy and well executed. –Jimmy Alvarado (Eradicator)


MEHKAGO NT:
Massive Fucking Headwounds: LP
Dark, brooding, downtuned hardcore, these dudes pretty much seem to be glowing with hate on this one. They’re certainly convincing, I’ll give em that. As far as I can tell, they pretty much despise everything, but especially fashion punks and religious sects. These are slow, droning, punishing songs, with blazing thrash attacks scattered throughout. The cover art’s got a bunch of dudes at a show surrounding the singer and, yep, every single one of them is bleeding from the noggin. Something tells me I would most assuredly not be able to handle a pit at a Mehkago NT show. –Keith Rosson (To Live A Lie)


ME FIRST AND THE GIMME GIMMES:
Sing in Japanese: CDEP
That title is no misnomer there, kids; they do indeed warble profusely in that fair country’s native tongue. Funny, but I’ve always wondered what these guys would sound like if they did originals, and I reckon this is about as close as it’s gonna get to that. This is one of those rare moments when I know fuck all about any of the covers they’re coverin’, but the band’s charm and uncanny ability to keep modern pop punk’s curse of “let’s increase our irrelevancy by sounding more and more like each other” completely at bay. No surprise, considering this is the same band that managed to make Barry Manilow sound good. –Jimmy Alvarado (Fat)


MAN…OR ASTRO-MAN:
Your Weight on the Moon: CD
A reissue of a 10” EP, plus the tracks from the Mission to Chaos and Return to Chaos 7” EPs. I profess to have little to no real knowledge about this band, which is a huge oversight on my part. I have no real explanation why, seeing as everything I’ve ever heard by ‘em I dug, but, nonetheless, they’re one o’ them bands I always promised I’d pay more attention to but never actually got around to picking up any of their stuff. By the sound of it, these are from relatively early in their career, with virtually no synths in evidence and all but one of the nineteen tracks are surfy instrumentals with a beefy, punky sound and a lot of audio samples from assorted movies and television shows. If that sounds right up your alley but, like this dolt, haven’t taken the time to give ‘em proper adulation, I suggest you get to it, bucko. –Jimmy Alvarado (Overground)


MALL’D TO DEATH:
The Process of Reaching Out: 7”
When I signed up for reviews, I suppose I should have seen this one coming: two solid label dudes who I’d consider friends release a record that just isn’t for me. Not that this is bad... far from it, in fact! Lyrically, I can totally get behind topics like rallying against the digital age or wallowing in self-deprecation, and the musicianship and energy on this album is apparent. It’s just that while fifteen years ago I would have been all over this, these days I could take or leave their brand of ‘90s pop punk with ska influences. If you’re a fan of Dun Bin Had or Bomb The Music Industry, this will be right up your alley. It’s just leaving me a bit lukewarm. –Chris Mason (It’s Alive/GC)


MACHETAZO / MARROW:
Split: 12”
I like a novelty item like the next person. Record cut like a saw blade? Cool! Even if I hate the record, I would keep it for just that. Yup! I can be a record nerd a lot of the time. Machetazo: Spain-based grindcore band that has kept up the fight since 1994, based on a quick search of the interwebs. They are also a two-piece outfit, which probably keeps things efficient. They’re very much like one of my other favorite two-piece bands, Population Reduction; the difference being the lyrics are in Spanish and this band delves more into the heavier parts of death metal. All in all, raging. Morrow: From the depths of Baltimore, this band belts out the evil-sounding death metal. Pictures of face paint and throwing up devil horns while swinging your hair is the picture that pops up into my deteriorating mind. The music is done with precision and they definitely seem to be proficient in the genre they have chosen. Grind vs. death metal? The grind side is the winner for me. –Donofthedead (Dysphoria)


LOUD SQUIRT:
Déjà Vu Revue Blues: 7” EP
Medium-fi trash rock, emphasis on the rock. The tempos are reined in, but the songs are well written and the delivery has the requisite intensity to push this into the “winner” pile. –Jimmy Alvarado (High School Refuse)


LIMES, THE:
Tarantula!: LP
It is hard not to compare The Limes to The Modern Lovers. Songwriter Shawn Cripps talk-sings his sentiments in a flat manner that combines lazy charm with understated poetry. Most of the album moves at the pace of The Modern Lover’s “Pablo Picasso.” The guitar playing is authoritative and undistorted. The Limes have such an excellent vocabulary of measured rock riffs that the record rocks without moving above a gallop. But most endearing about the album is the unique take on Americana. We need more people singing about the landscape. Many acts that attempt this style mistake drinking and dysfunction with interesting. The voice of the album and lyrical content set it apart from the typical affected roots music that seems to be popular right now. –Billups Allen (Goner)


LENGUAS LARGAS:
Self-titled: 12”
Lenguas Largas is a band that, firstly, should be seen to be believed. Four guitars, two drummers. Brothers and old friends, made up of some of the best dudes from the best bands over the last ten years (and more). All of those things coalesce into what is the most daring and inventive band in punk right now. The guitars weave in and out, creating an expansive, vibrant tapestry of sound, which is pierced by Isaac’s soulful yowl and then punctuated by the two drummers pounding away in unison. Spacey and lazy daydreams here; frenetic and harried bursts of rock and roll shrapnel there; a low and slow burning ragout that comes to a boil, opening up hidden flavors and fragrances. Amazing is a superlative that I often find overused, as well as often used incorrectly, but in this instance there is no better way to describe the greatness that is Lenguas Largas. –Jeff Proctor (Tic Tac Totally / Recess)


LEBAKKO:
En Tullut Toistamaan Tarinaa Samaa: 7”
Great Finnish punk/hardcore of the non-Discharge influenced variety, meaning they’re not particularly fast and are devoid of that stereotypical beat, but are catchy as hell with a singer who’s just spitting out lyrics coated in venom. One of those instances here when limiting things to just two songs is plain goddamned wrong. More, more! –Jimmy Alvarado (PML, pikakelauksellamaailmanloppuun@gmail.com)


LAST RESORT / OLD FIRM CASUALS:
Split: 2 x 7”
Is Rancid’s Lars Fredericksen a phony for going back to his skin past and starting Old Firm Casuals? I don’t know and I don’t care. What I do know is that his new band is an earnest, well developed oi project that doesn’t seem at all out of place paired up with the legends that are Last Resort. An essential 21st Century oi release if ever there was one, this is a perfect mash up of the new and the old. Plus, if one kid gets into Last Resort through this record, a vital community service has been achieved. –Art Ettinger (Oi! The Boat, oitheboat.com)


KRIG I HUDIK:
II: 7”
The cover art led me to believe that this was some sort of Kraftwork-esque synth-driven band, and the back cover—a digitally rendered image that looks like a screen shot from some urban warfare video game with Swedish text—threw me for a loop. Not knowing what I was going to get, I put this thing on and was confronted with an onslaught of old school Scandinavian hardcore that starts out going a million miles an hour and doesn’t let up over the course of the record. This thing is absolutely pummeling: heavy riffs and driving drum beats with coarse, shouted vocals. No melody, no pretense. After some research, I found out that the band is members of Totalitär (who also make a great stylistic reference if you’re into them) and Brainbombs, and that the majority of these songs are covers of old Swedish hardcore bands. This thing is spectacular. I don’t know how many made their way into the U.S., but it’s definitely worth the time to track down if you’re even remotely interested in Scandinavian hardcore. –Ian Wise (Skrammel, http://skrammelrecords.se)


KNIFEY SPOONY:
Self-titled: 7” EP
The opener, “Art Show Press Pass,” is a bit of thrashy punk with a bit of sly sophistication buried under the sloppy sound. “Retro Poser Enema” throws maybe a smidge of psychedelia into the crash-bang, and they close things out with a cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Hey Tonight.” More fun than it would appear and much better than it has any business being. Great artwork, too. –Jimmy Alvarado (Orifice Dorm)


JUST URBAIN:
Everybody Loves: 7”
Thought for a second the band decided to unleash another two hundred copies of their second EP some thirty-one years after its initial release, but on closer inspection, it looks as though the folks responsible for 540 Records and Chaos in Tejas are the guilty parties. The performance is straight outta Brisbane, Australia circa 1980, and is barely adept rock with the odd piano thrown in to give things some sophistication. The closing title track made it onto one of the later Killed by Death comps, and with good reason. –Jimmy Alvarado (540, timmy@chaosintejas.com)


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·KILL THE HIPPIES
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