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Record Reviews

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VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Bloodstains across Philadelphia: LP
While the album title is a bit disingenuous, especially if one is fooled into thinkin’ this is another addition to the infamous Bloodstains Across… bootleg series, this is a healthy overview of the state of Philly’s hardcore scene circa 2010-11. Bucket Flush, Jenkem, Gash (not to be confused with the old Australian band of the same name), Dry Feet, Ballistik, and a number of others dig into the various shades and hues of the hardcore genre, thrashin’ and screechin’ and whoopin’ it up like it was 1982 or something. Lotta good tunes here if this is yer genre of choice, but my personal fave comes from No Coffins, whose “Lazy” sounds a bit like the Groinoids. –jimmy (Eaglebauer Enterprises)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Best of Unsound Bands (1983-85): LP
Unsound was a short-lived label outta Long Island that unleashed some swell hardcore and other assorted noise circa the period that’s identified in the title. Collected here are tracks by Insanity Defense and Satan’s Cheerleaders (two different bands sharing pretty much the same members meting out a sorta yin-yang selection of thrash stuff), Fatal Vision (more thrash-o-rama for ye), SFN (aka Stands for Nothing, who are of a more melodic bent, and even occasionally hinting at what would later become known as “alternative rock”), and the Glenheads (a one-man noise mongering feast). Fans of obscure ‘80s hardcore, or just hardcore in general, will likely poop their pampers over this. –jimmy (Welfare)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
A Tale of Rotten Orange: 2 x LP
In the beginning, so many of my favorite bands came from Southern California— Adolescents, Dickies, Black Flag, and Descendents among many others. They shaped a huge part of my life. Somewhere along the line, punk rock from the region became “So-Cal” and was synonymous with big shorts and chain wallets. Some of it was good, but not a lot. I had to search out labels like Hostage and TKO to get my California punk fix. Those labels put out some amazing compilation records showcasing bands from all over the region that were out there ripping it up. This compilation is a fine addition to the tradition. Orange Fight has released a thirty-nine (!) song double LP worth of the best of the best that OrangeCounty has to offer. There is a healthy dose of the stalwarts (Smogtown, The Crowd, Broken Bottles, Bonecrusher, and The Stitches) and some newer stuff (The Junk, Crazy Squeeze, Disguster, Druglords Of The Avenues, and The Piss Pops). It all works and is a compilation that I’ll listen to over and over, just like Tower 13 or The Hostage Situation. I’ll also be on the lookout for records from most of these bands. Mission accomplished! –ty (Orange Fight, orangefight.com)


VANNA INGET:
Jag Ska Fly Tills Jag Hittar Hem: 7”EP
I know I’m in the minority when I say that I thoroughly enjoy listening to punk bands in their non-English tongues. (Not having English translations doesn’t bother me at all.) I liken it to foreign and silent movies. With silent movies, you watch them differently, pay attention to other details. One of the senses is limited; the others sharpen. Sweden’s Vånna Inget punch my ticket. Wonderful female-fronted melodic punk in line with Masshysteri and Knugen Faller (Ny Vag dripping all over the place, but not from Umea as far as I can tell.) Karolina has a wonderful roll of her r’s and spectacular enunciation, the band is mid-tempo, and wound tight, like how I imagine Blondie if they were more punk and less disco. Vånna Inget establishes a space, a mood, and constant force that’s not gnarly, but tight and on pressure points. Nice. What’s potentially lost as a non-Swedish understander-er? Singing along. I think I can rightly assume they’re not racist, homophobic, sexist, or classist and here’s what I’ve poorly patched together. The band’s name means “No Tank.” I think it’s less war tank, more of like a cistern, but could be wrong. Tankless? The song titles translate to: “I WillFlyUntil I FindHome,” “Spit in the Wind,” “Distress,” and “Our Dreams Are Dead.” Oooh, yeah. Add that to your English-Swedish of Volvo, Ikea, meatballs, and women’s volleyball team. –todd (Erste Theke Tonträger, erstetheketontraeger.blogspot.com, Vaukajott@gmx.de)


USELESS EATERS:
The Moves: 7” EP
Four tracks of simple punk rock tunesmithin’. Sounds like some long lost Killed By Death geek’s wet dream, which I reckon is the point. –jimmy (Jolly Dream, jollydreamrecords@gmail.com)


UNSANE:
Wreck: CD
Unlike some who have trod the same loud, sludgy terra, Unsane maximize the vitriolic hammer blows they pass off as “songs” by keeping things simple: come up with a riff, decide whether the rhythm will approximate trudging through molasses or tar, crank everything up to full volume, and start bludgeoning. They retain that formula here, dropping nine new vitriolic, occasionally bluesy, sonic assaults and a surprisingly faithful cover of Flipper’s “Ha Ha Ha.” Twenty-four years, seven albums, a few lineup changes, one near fatal ass-whoopin’, one hiatus, and these guys still crank out some of the most caustic brand of rock music you’re likely to find. –jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


UNFUN / MUHAMMAD ALI:
Split: 7”
This is a pretty evenly matched split. Unfun kick it off by doing what they do best: fuzzed-out tunes that harken back to a day when we would call them “emo” and it wouldn’t be a bad thing. Wearing your heart on your sleeve via Jawbreaker, Leatherface, or Tiltwheel. You’re reading Razorcake; I don’t need to explain this any further. Short version: Another damn fine couple of tracks. This is my first exposure to Muhammad Ali. I like this a lot. Not so fuzzy, and a little more tuneful, these songs really want me to go check out some more from them. The two bands really sound good together. –ty (A.D.D.)


UNDERLINGS, THE:
Vice Squad: 7”
The A-side is an unexpectedly jaunty number about applying to join the vice squad that wouldn’tve sounded out of place on any of those late ‘70s/early ‘80s UK mod/power pop compilations of a few years ago on Captain Mod or Captain Power Pop or whatever-the-hell Records. As such, i think it’d sound pretty cool bookended between “Can We Go Dancing” by the Amber Squad and “Sema4 Messages” by Sema 4 ((or something)), but i’m not sure it really bangs me over the head as a standout standalone A-side—it’s decent, but not exceptional. On the flip, “Second Best” goes off in an almost Humpers-like direction, although the rhythm of the vocals in the bits with no drums remind me of Bob Seger in “Get Out Of Denver” and maybe I shouldn’tve told anybody that. Slightly rougher vocals on “Black & White” would allow it to pass as hardcore in perhaps the TMA mold, circa 1984. This band is not entirely uninteresting! Huzzah! BEST SONG: “Vice Squad” BEST SONG TITLE: “Black & White” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Cover art contains the first drawing I’ve ever seen of the Dictators’ “Manifest Destiny” album. –norb (Meth Bog, myspace.com/methbogrecords)


UNCIVIL, THE:
Fred’s Liquor: 7”

So much booze. My leathery liver shuddered just looking at the sleeve on this single. The music is steeped in alcohol as well. Mid-tempo scuzz punk not unlike Dayglo Abortions. Rounded out with a mediocre cover of Skrewdriver’s “I Don’t Like You,” it isn’t really all that memorable.

–ty (The Uncivil, theuncivil.com)


TUS IDOLOS:
Un Gusto: 7”
Tus Idolos describe themselves as “jean jacket rock’n’roll” and I think it fits them perfectly. Garage-y punk’n’roll from Puerto Rico, the jams Tus Idolos kick out are catchy, with great hooks and vocals worthy of epic singalongs. Lyrics are all in Spanish, so I don’t know what they mean, but I was able to follow along with the lyric sheet in hand while rocking out. My one complaint about this 7” is how the mix of the recording makes the entire band sound echo-y and distant, like listening to them from outside a venue. A better mix would do the band justice, but as it stands, I’m definitely digging it. –Paul J. Comeau (Discos De Hoy, discosdehoy@yahoo.com)


TROPIEZO / VIVISICK:
Split: 7” EP
Tropiezo: Is it even remotely possible these cats are capable of a crappy tune? If so, they’ve yet to serve one up thus far. Five more tracks here of fast, ridiculously tight thrash. That these cats are not worldwide superstars is criminal; that they continue here with what has to be one of the longest streaks of consistently killer hardcore is a treat. Vivisick: They handle their side of the wax slab quite adeptly, with crazed Japanese thrash that could also easily hold its own against bands like Stalin and Gauze had they their own Wayback Machine, and yet tempers what could be an onslaught of primal scream-fueled anger with a sense of humor. Helluva split here, I gotta say. –jimmy (Discos de Hoy, discosdehoy@yahoo.com)


TREASURE FLEET:
Cocamotion: LP
Isaac Thotz is one of a small handful of musicians I’m willing to follow anywhere. He’s musically much smarter than me. He’s here to reveal and share, not pretend, pout, and approximate. (See modern day corporate-backed, energy-drink-stupid-car “garage rock” for the latter.) Razorcake readers are probably most familiar with Isaac as one of the singers/guitarists of the Arrivals. Treasure Fleet’s done all the heavy lifting and dusty-fingered, shit-listening, vinyl flipping through hidden gems of the ‘60s. Dude, I’m not even going to pretend I like the Beatles. I’m motherfuckin’ choosy with the Pink Floyd / Kinks / Animals / Zombies catalogs—all signposts for Treasure Fleet. Yet, I openly embrace and totally dig this record. How? Distillery. Isaac took out the self-indulgent wank, the boring bits, the failed experiments, the major label softening and compromises. Cocamotion isn’t a nostalgic highjack or a thin stylistic exercise. I know Isaac’s a hard-working, music-loving, punk and punk-friendly musician who’s completely at odds with modern popular music—how it’s made, how it’s consumed. What to do? Reach back in time; renovate, rebuild, reconfigure, and reoccupy that space. Inspired. –todd (Recess, recessrecords.com)


TRANZMITORS:
“I See the Writing on the Wall” b/w “Dream Our Dreams Away”: 7”
When you live with four distinct seasons, you crave music differently. Those first warm days, driving with the windows down, call for nothing other than power pop to me (though the hoards of cars blaring Sublime probably beg to differ). The Exploding Hearts have been in my CD player for no less than two weeks and then this beautiful slab of clear blue vinyl shows up on my doorstep. Jeffy McCloy is one of my favorite current vocalists, going from the crooning of Dave Vanian/Doug Burns to snarls to staccato, seamlessly. This is a good a place as any to start with Tranzmitors because, honestly, it’s all fuckin’ stellar. If this hasn’t sold out already, it will. –megan (React, itstimetoreact.com)


TOYS THAT KILL:
Fambly 42: LP
Okay, I see there are several other reviews for this record in this issue. They explain the sound, so if you’ll indulge me, I want to step back and offer a larger view. Let’s unpack what DIY punk can mean on its best days. 1) DIY punk is some of the best music in the world. Ever. TTK is an excellent example of workable, long term DIY punk on a sustainable level. I’m not here to sell you a bandwagon to jump on. (There is no bandwagon.) 2) Real bands are made up of human beings, not heroes. Heroes are for political manipulation, television dramas, and the history of civilization. TTK, however, are all extremely talented musicians. I’ve seen them so many times, that, often, I’ll just watch one of them the entire set and still not understand how the fuck they do what they do. 3) There’s something wicked about hearing a brand new song—”Oh, that sounds like TTK”—and then having the song surprise you, having the song show new depths. On one hand, you know what you’re getting. On the other hand, it’s a new revelation, an organic growth, a new light in the color spectrum. How often does that happen? And their songs have legs. The Citizen Abortion’s over ten years old now. It’s now on automatic recall for me, like The Big Lebowski. 4) Repeat this a couple of times: “Don’t take great local bands for granted. Don’t take great local bands for granted.” Unequivocally, TTK’s one of L.A.’s best punk rock bands. 5) The road to true democracy is paved by imperfect democracies existing in tyrannical times. TTK—partially via Recess also—operates like the life of the band depends on controlling its music, from recording, to distribution, to touring. They’re buying in (the initial dividends are always smaller) instead of selling out. Let’s talk about bands like this more instead of the all-too-regular, all-too-predictable next wave of bands that’re going to be seduced by “increased exposure” via corporate fucklords. 6) Although it’s been six years since the last full-length, Shanked!—don’t forget their split LP with Grabass, URTC, and Stoned At Heart—it was worth every second of waiting. Instant gratification doesn’t build lighthouses. Fambly 42 is a beacon of light for punk rock in 2012. It’s not going to be outshone by ten other records this year and it’s gonna help a bunch of people with tons of shit in their lives from crashing onto dark rocks. Mark it, dude. The power of DIY punk. –todd (Recess, recessrecords.com)


TOYS THAT KILL:
Fambly 42: LP
Twelve years ago (damn near the day, even), I first heard TTK. My tastes were strongly rooted in meathead-y ECHC, oi, and street punk at the time, but new friends all had a burned copy of the yet-to-be-released Citizen Abortion playing nonstop, and I was quickly hooked. There was something there that I never found in F.Y.P., something less silly, but still refusing to be too serious. Since then, I’ve seen them potentially hundreds of times and picked up every release. For the most part, every show is better than the last, and each record has topped itself, but in a slow grow. When the clear green vinyl (yeah, nerds, go get it) first hit the table, I liked it. Liked, not loved. Within a day, it was beyond a craving. I couldn’t get enough. I was seriously reading liner notes from other TTK albums while listening to Fambly 42 because I wanted to have it even more. I don’t know if it’s in the recording (it’s a little rougher—they recorded it in Todd Conge’s Clown Sound studio themselves instead of at Sweatbox as the previous albums) or just a hint of a different approach, or (ugh) growth, but there is something here that’s pure fucking magic. If it’s left the record player, it hasn’t been for long, and I don’t anticipate that changing any time soon. Easily a Top Ten of the Year already. –megan (Recess, recessrecords.com)


TOYS THAT KILL:
Fambly 42: LP

This record is so ridiculously TTK and still so breathtakingly original. It’s like in the last six years they uncovered another level of what it means to be Toys That Kill. And within the level they found the ability to be both harder and softer than they had on previous records. The ability to get even weirder, but never straying too far that it would seem unnatural. In the context of the last five years, Fambly 42 fits in perfectly with albums like New Animals, C I V I L W A R, and The High Hate Us. Sometimes a great record can take awhile. There’s no rush, because in the end these records will be remembered for a long time.

–Daryl Gussin (Recess, recessrecords.com)


TOYS THAT KILL:
Fambly 42: LP
I really like food metaphors. That’s probably because I like food a lot. Well, I know for a fact that once you find a restaurant that makes your favorite dish, you like to go back. Sometimes the chef, being an artist, will change things up a bit. If the chef is any good, you will be opened up to some amazing new flavors and if not, you’re pissed. Toys That Kill are master chefs. This record is the aural equivalent of a culinary masterpiece. My first thought was, “It sounds a lot more like Underground Railroad To Candyland than the last one” but why wouldn’t it? Three quarters of the band are in URTC and this is the first TTK record that they’ve recorded at their own Clown Sound studio. The next thought was, “That’s rad!” On repeated listens (of which there has been many), the magic of Toys That Kill took over: the seemingly random yet important lyrics, every little underlying sound and voice that is there on purpose. It all fits together in a way that only these four guys could pull off. I especially love how the record is paced. Todd sings then suddenly there is Sean, right when you’re looking for him. And when they both sing together it’s like mystical cheesecake from the sky falling right into my mouth! As I flip the record again, I can only hope they don’t take as long a break as last time. –ty (Recess)


TNPAH:
Reborn Chaos: CD
Wow, this is terrible. Overly technical metal that noodles and noodles into oblivion. As the disc goes from song to song, my attention span wanders over everything from what is Eva Green starring in these days, to checking social networking statuses, only to realize this album is still going... Whew! Someone open a window. This stinks! –Matt Average (Tnpah, wod-prods@mail.ru)


TIMMY’S ORGANISM:
Scum Revolution: 7”
The A-side here, “Scum Revolution,” sounds like it crawled outta the same sludgy, slimy pit where the Stooges previously plucked perennial faves like “I Wanna Be Your Dog” and “1969.” Definitely the kinda tune that makes you feel like you need a shower after a couple o’ listens. The flip, “When the Bottles Break,” is an acoustic number, decidedly tamer than its companion, but is somehow unsettling in its own right. –jimmy (Hozac, hozacrecords.com)


TIMMY’S ORGANISM / JOHN WESLEY COLEMAN III:
Split: 7”
Timmy’s Organism: Starts off with a bit of psychedelic delay-drenched guitar, then cashes that in for a trashy rock stomper. John Wesley Coleman III: A potent slice of ‘60s-influenced minor chord pop. –jimmy (Goner)


TIM BARRY:
40 Miler: 12”EP
Formerly of Avail, Barry has turned from hardcore to country punk. Festooned with harmonica and tambourine solos, the title of his latest solo effort on ivory and gold vinyl alludes to a freight train rider who prefers short rides close to home. Living in a shack in the backyard of his girlfriend’s house, Barry laments over hipsters at designer markets, train hopping, and hobos. And booze; can’t forget booze. Barry’s lyrics leave a poetic sting as heard in “Wezeltown” and “Bankers Dilemma,” signifying he hasn’t lost any of the piss and vinegar from his Avail days. Julie Karr, a fellow Richmond, VA singer/songwriter, shares vocals with Tim in “Adele and Hell,” a bluesy break-up to make-up duet. If folk punk is yer thing, you best pick this up. Recommended. –Kristen K (Chunksaah, chunksaah.com)


THETAN:
Welcome to Whine Country: 7” EP
Down-tuned grind stuffed with lots o’ wham-bang, screamin’ ‘n’ carryin’ on. –jimmy (Anti-Corp)


TENEMENT / CHEEKY:
“Blast Exhaust” / “So Bored”: Split: 7”
Cheeky: Now why did you have to go and break up? There’s a nice bit of see-sawing on these two songs between more dissonant, throat-chopping hardcore directness (“your shit sucks”) and tones of the more aching punk-with-melody variety (Bananas, not managers, publicists, and Pro-Tooled hair gel). A punk gang with lots of heart? That’s what I think. Tenement: Disarmingly confident in exploration, Tenement’s an exciting progression in this post-Ergs! world. The ability to pull simultaneously from punk’s deep heritage and make it sound like it never had a care in the world, that they’re kids with their arms out a van window on a summer’s night—that’s a thing of beauty. I have a deep love for Midwestern punk—Dü, ‘Mats, ChiTels, D4—and if Tenement stays together as a band and keeps releasing records, they’ll be no mere blip on a radar, but a rock in the stream that other bands flow around. Two excellent songs on their side. –todd (Let’s Pretend / No Brakes)


SYNTHETIC ID:
Self-titled: 7”
Synthetic ID sound like Greg Sage, D. Boone, and Colin Newman fabricating the house band for the International Space Station. Or better yet, spending three days in close quarters on an uncharted trek to the Sea of Tranquility. Anxious paranoia dripping from the walls. It’s jerky, derailed, and draws heavily from early post-punk, but chugs along at a classic punk tempo, blasting out totally agitated lyrics the whole time. Space madness? Or just a need to escape the surface of this planet, even if it just be through the act of playing two minute punk jams? Either way, it’s exciting and different. –Daryl Gussin (Satellite Visions, crucialvibez@gmail.com / Cut the Cord That…, ctct-records.tumblr.com)


SUFFERING MIND / PROTESTANT:
Split: 6” EP
I have a few odd size records, like the 5”, or the 10” and 8”, and most of them are pretty disposable—more about the novelty of size than the actual music. Not the case here! This six incher is a crusher! Protestant don’t disappoint and just get better and better with each new release. Their two songs here are definitely some of their best material. They open up, go for it, and cause a lot of damage in the short amount of time allowed for the format. Heavy and fast, with a good dose of low end, the sinister atmosphere doesn’t bog down the delivery. These two songs have a way of working themselves into your memory with only a couple listens. I just know I’m going to be mentally referencing “No Peace” sometime in the next week, “Dig deep! Dig deep!” Suffering Mind are more on the grind side, with the pummeling percussion and abrasive dual attack of guitars and vocals (one high, the other throaty and gurgly). I’ve set my standards for grind incredibly high in recent years due to the sheer amount of shit bands playing this style. Suffering Mind definitely stands out above the pack and should appeal to anyone who likes music that is a bit heavy and, well, brutal. Their two tracks go by in a blur, but it’s a damn nice blur. –Matt Average (Halo Of Flies, halooffliesrecords.com, To Live A Lie, tolivealie.com)


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