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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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STE MCCABE:
Brains of Britain: CD
Singer/songwriter, one man band kind of stuff from the U.K. Using the term “queercore” might be misleading, as Mr. McCabe employs elements of electronica and ‘80s-styled alt-rock to great effect. McCabe does seem to possess a particularly endearing snotty vocal and lyrical quality that actually keeps things interesting though, making this one a keeper.  –Garrett Barnwell (Maneki-Neko, ste-mccabe.co.uk)


STERILE JETS:
Liquor Store: CD
Looking at the cover art, I certainly wasn’t expecting this batch of edgy, Minutemen-meets-Flipper tracks. There is a certain tension running through these tracks that keeps me coming back. Also, I’m a sucker for blown-out, turn-it-up-to-twelve recordings, which this thing delivers in spades. –Garrett Barnwell (Yesca Rock)


STONECHAT:
Bacco: CD
On their Bandcamp page, Stonechat advertises that this CD comes with five mini-comics that illustrate the lyrical content of the album. That sounds rad, but I didn’t get a copy. I wish I had. –John Mule (Float Away, Dangling, floatawaydangling.bandcamp.com)


STREET SHARK:
Heart Age: Cassette
Tapes aren’t my bag. But when they’re documents of “the marginalized, the peripheral, and the isolated” as Social Cancer from Birmingham, AL is releasing, the format can be overlooked. When that document sounds like is Ian Curtis fronting a current shoegaze band turning up to eleven in your basement, I’m ready for repeat listenings.  –Matt Seward (Social Cancer, socialcancer.net)


SUFFERING MIND / GUANTANAMO PARTY PROGRAM: :
Split: EP
Suffering Mind churn out heavy, heavy apocalyptic doom-style metal with grind-style vocals. The music is definitely energetic, but they stick pretty close to the formula and don’t do a whole lot at establishing their own identity. Guantanamo Party Program mix it up a bit with interesting results, and it’s their side of the record that I listen to most. The guitar tone is atypical of the genre. It sounds more like 1990s indie rock with heavy percussion and a gloomy bass underneath. Before you skip down to the next review, believe me, this style is a plus, as it helps differentiate them from the pack. It somehow works for these guys. The music is certainly heavy and packed with a solid thud. It’s the guitar and its tone, though, that gives this song character and depth. The guitar breaks create this mood that’s effective at holding your attention for the duration, while the rest of the instruments and vocals do their thing. It could be interesting to hear how this band progresses.  –Guest Contributor (Halo Of Flies, halooffliesrecords.com)


TANGO VIOLENZO:
The Submission: EP: 7”
You think the guy with wobbly arms who just robot danced his way out of that dark alley is funny at first, until he is suddenly in your face, choking you with sandpaper hands, laughing and jumping up and down, getting louder and crazier, and you don’t know how you’re even breathing through all of this. –MP Johnson (Luftslott)


TEARGAS ROCK:
Self-titled: 12” EP
The (Young) Pioneers started in Richmond, Virginiain 1994, shortly after the breakup of singer/guitarist Adam Nathanson’s art-damaged hardcore band Born Against. They started playing trebly, acoustic folk and recorded prolifically, evolving through cryptic blasts of punked-up soul and finally landing on the loose rock’n’roll of their final LP, 1999’s Free the (Young) Pioneers Now! After the (Young) Pioneers broke up, they had a short-lived band called Teargas Rock. Hissy dubs of a demo were passed around Richmond, but never saw official release until now. These seven songs were tracked in late ‘99, and are the only Teargas Rock recordings. Songwriting-wise, they’re the logical continuation of the (Y)Ps’ sound, the band (Nathanson, long-time bassist Marty Key, and new drummer Randy Davis) a bit less hectic, more comfortable with melody, and delving deeper into ‘60s soul. A big change is the lyrics. The (Y)Ps’ lyrics spoke about social injustice in Richmondand were peppered with references to the radical politics of previous generations, while Teargas Rock’s lyrics were written at the height of anti-globalization activism, and work perfectly as protest anthems for Battle in Seattle-era politicos. The (Young) Pioneers gained popularity posthumously, and were often cited as an influence on the folk punk scene of the ‘00s. Against Me! even name-check them in a song. For me, the (Y)Ps were the ripshit trio who opened for Kill Rock Stars bands, and made something click inside of this new-to-the-south, half-black punk rocker who was trying to make sense of his identity and his father’s hometown. They made me feel okay with having one foot in black life and one foot in white music, and I’ll always associate the (Y)Ps with discovery of self and of Richmond. It’s super exciting to get more songs by these musicians, and to hear it sound so vital so long after the fact. –Chris Terry (littleblackcloudrecords.com)


TEE PEES, THEE:
Self-titled: LP
Wait-wait-wait a second—I can hear all the instruments! Can it be Los Angeles’s finest purveyors of shit-fi have—GASP!—sold their souls and gone mainstream? What’s next—duets with Nicki Minaj in plastic see-through hot pants? Guest appearances on Ellen? Hipsters wearing Thee Tee Pees half-shirts bought at Urban Outfitters for thrice the price? Oh, the fuggin’ humanity! Sure, their habit of plundering the depths of the nether-area where hardcore and trashy garage intersect is largely intact and no less potent, and they still come on with the subtlety of a rhino dancing ballet, but for chrissakes, aren’t there some sorta rules about avoiding sonic coherence? Next thing you know, the Mummies will be releasing CDs or something....  –Jimmy Alvarado (Manglor)


TESTORS:
Complete Recordings 1976-1979: 2 x LP
Do you want to be cool? Badass? Totally irresistible? Of course you do, Poindexter! I confess that before I held this held this double LP in my hands, I was a drooling, slack-jawed Cro-Magnon incapable of anything remotely hip. Now I preach the gospel of Sonny Vincent atop a soap box and swing a tuna can from my neck like the miscreant that I am. If this sounds rad (which I know it does) just follow these four easy rules. Rule one: Give zero fucks. Rule two: A fuck-all attitude will take you to most any place. Rule three: Your fashion accessories can never—I repeat—never be too ridiculous. Rule four: If you’re actually following these rules, then you’re doing it all wrong, ding-dong. In all seriousness, Todd Killings, from his introduction, puts it best: “For a band that was left out of almost all of the history books on New York Punk in the 1970s, these guys really recorded a lot of material...” No kidding. Testors don’t slack off. I suspect that Sonny Vincent is a vampire as each song hasn’t aged a day, much like his jet-black, razor straight hair. Every tune is a garage punk, power pop behemoth of confident rock’n’roll melodies and gleeful degeneration. I would be shocked if after listening to all thirty-seven songs you are unwilling to convert to The Cult of Sonny Vincent.  –Sean Arenas (Alien Snatch, aliensnatch.com)


THERE MUST BE A HOLE IN YOUR MEMORY:
A Tribute to Adrian Borland and The Sound:: CD
I’ll start off by stating that I’m a huge fan of Adrian Borland. I feel like he is one of—if not the—most underrated artists of the eighties post-punk scene. The Sound started up in the late seventies and made music similar to the Chameleons UK and Joy Division, but all their own. If you know either of those two bands but have never heard the Sound, you’re in for a treat. I saw the title of this CD and it immediately caught my attention. I previously hadn’t heard of a single band on this compilation, which I found kind of strange. But, strangely enough, everyone’s covers impressed me. The songs go through the whole Sound catalog and even into some of Borland’s solo material. The insert mentions a documentary that is coming out on Borland. In the meantime, if you want to hear some new takes on some of the best post-punk songs ever written, check this comp out.  –Ryan Nichols (The Beautiful Music, admin@thebeautifulmusic.com)


THINGZ, THE:
Red Future: LP
A screen printed cover sleeve, good or bad, is always a way to grab attention. One depicting a crab with cryptic militaristic flourishes and a vague communist feel will definitely beckon a listener to ponder its insides. So you show up at the bar they’re playing this weekend, order two fists of tall boys, and start to have a great evening since you don’t really get to go out very much anymore. The Thingz take the stage, looking not quite rockabilly, but projecting a definite sense of style. They plug in and proceed to sweat out catchy, over-driven Chuck Berry guitar trash rock. You move to the front of the stage, excitedly raising your beers in the air and proceed to have the best Cramps, B-52’s, Southern Culture On The Skids-influenced bar rock night of your life. You wake up the next morning wearing the wrong sized Thingz T-shirt, late night BBQ burrito breath, and this LP on your turntable. Your hangover wants the listening to validate last night’s grandiosity, but instead leaves you with the fuzziness of questionable decisions. Fun, if not a necessity –Matt Seward (C.A.R., thethingz.bandcamp.com)


THREE ROUNDS/ JUNKIE FIGHT SPLIT:
Split: 7”EP
Split with Three Rounds and Junkie Fight. I started with Junkie Fight, a band out of Oakland, and was amused by their first song… all twenty seconds of it. Junkie Fight is harsh, with methodic metal guitar, lo-fi recordings, and growling-gargling-nails vocals which reminds me of the band Strange Matter. They mix it up though with songs that teeter more in to a garage sound to oi at times. On the other side, Three Rounds is a completely different vibe. Very Ramones and Queers inspired. Keeping it clean and playing it safe… not exactly my favorite thing, but it’s well executed. Some people really dig that shit. I say go for it.  –Camylle Reynolds (Self-released, joey_836@hotmail.com)


TIMEKILLER:
Bleed Out: 7” EP
The sound is blown out a bit, and there’s some reverb pumped in, but what this Rio de Janeiro crust-flaked hardcore unit puts down is rendered all the more bleak as a result. Judging from what’s here, they’re not on a speed kick like many of the other hardcore bands that come outta Brazil, but prefer rather to let the venom burn and seethe—and then when you least expect it, they hit you with “Sinking in Shit,” which recalls, well, vintage Venom. Not bad at all.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Timekiller, timekillerpunx.bandcamp.com)


TIMMY VULGAR:
Timmy 45: 7”
Dear Timmy Vulgar: You sure are twisted. One side of this 7” is an improvised country-punk number where even you admit to not know what the hell you’re singing about. It seems to be centered around wanting to drink whiskey and growing a palm/weed tree garden (I think... ?) The other side, at least on my friend’s turntable, is silence. I don’t understand, but I don’t think you want me to. Keep up the good work.  –Alanna Why (Terror Trash)


TOY STORE RIOT:
Viva Chile: 7”
I will never understand pressing a 7” single with five songs and making it play at 33 RPM. Why not just pony up an extra few bucks and press a 12” that plays at 45 RPM and get a better record to have for posterity? Especially now that a single costs five to seven dollars, it seems like having a 12” to sell for eight to ten dollars makes more sense for all involved. At any rate, the 33 RPM pressing makes these songs sound very tinny and compressed, though the songs themselves aren’t bad. Mid-tempo pop punk with some of that Mike Dirnt kinda bass playing in parts. Music sound a lot like the mid-’90s stuff I remember though, thankfully, there is none of that fake snotty Screeching Weasel crap in the vocals. Tenement seems to have made it cool to actually kinda sing in pop punk these days, and I’m quite happy about that. Band is from D.C. and will appeal to fans of the aforementioned Midwestern titans, as well as The Figgs, Yesterdays Kids/Obsoletes and other tuneful, not-quite-punk sounds. –Mike Frame (Self-released, toystoreriot.bandcamp.com)


TRACY BRYANT / BILLY CHANGER:
2 in 1: Split: Cassette
The tunes by these two dudes work very well together; on the whole, this record is kind of like ultra lo-fi sixties garage rock like you would find on Crypt compilations in the ‘90s ramming up against ‘80s synth-pop sensibilities. Tracy Bryant is more of the former, and Billy Changer is more of the latter. For full flavor spectra, pair Tracy Bryant with the Cramps and Billy Changer with Ryan Adams. Enjoy! –The Lord Kveldulfr (Lollipop / Burger)


TRASH AXIS:
Grotesque: LP
Immediately Bad Acid Trip springs to mind, though I think Trash Axis take their grindcore further into the outer reaches and become less conventional in return. I would go as far to say that the saxophone, accordion, and glockenspiel dominate their sound more than distorted guitars. You still get the strangulated vocals this genre is known for, though you can figure out what the singer is saying—err uhh—growling, here and there. The keyboard tends to give this a carnival feel at times, and the glockenspiel makes some songs more whimsical than “brutal.” The lyrics are equally out there, with songs like “Poop Bomb” detailing how “poop fills up the internet.” Okay... So, if you’re a fan of grindcore, but sick of the same ol’ same ol’, then give this a listen. I doubt you’ve heard any other band of the genre like this.  –Matt Average (Trash Axis, trashaxis.bandcamp.com)


UGLY PARTS:
Wet: Cassette
I had my suspicions within minutes of putting this one in the ol’ boombox, and was happy to confirm them by playing this one against some old favorites: Ugly Parts play the particular variety of hardcore that was specific to Boston in the early ‘80s. The tempos, tone, and, most importantly, urgency found in Wet easily rubs elbows with the F.U’s My America and Jerry’s Kids’ Is This My World: raw, ugly, and pissed. It’s a joy to have something this realized and vital land in my mailbox. –Michael T. Fournier (uglyparts.bandcamp.com)


ULTRAMANTIS:
Black: CD
A wrestler decides he can sing and entices a punk band (Pissed Jeans) to head into the studio to make a record. Is this better than HulkHogan and the Wrestling Boot Band’s output? By a very slim margin. If only The Iron Sheik had been able to produce this, there might have been some potential here. The cover would probably make a good video.  –Sean Koepenick (relapse.com)


UNFUN:
Caroline: 7”
Melodic and mellow meets fun and fast in Unfun’s fifth 7”, Caroline. Side A (reading, “Yo, Play This Shit Fucking Loud…”) is pack with distorted, low vocals and an intense feeling of desperation struggling to stay afloat with a sea of emotional regrets. Kicking off with the titular line of this record, “Caroline,” we’re faced with an outpour of heartbreak, anger, and the often overwhelming feeling of everything being completely, utterly, and hopelessly fucked up for eight minutes before flipping over to side B, (continued with, “Or…Get The Fuck Out”). Immediately introduced to louder vocals blaring through speakers, this trio rapidly picks up their paces up for two more tracks before slowing back down with the fourth and final track, “Unglued.” Themed with deteriorating mental health and emotional breakdowns, this neatly pressed vinyl makes punk a threat again. –Genevieve Armstrong (Shallow Graves, shallowgravesrecords.com)


UNFUN:
Shores of Lake Erie: 12” EP
WithShores of Lake Erie, the band continues their grand tradition of heartbreak, fuckery, and ruination. I loved Pain Prescription and Sick Outside View and I was definitely looking forward to this one; Unfun’s combo of pop punk, sludge, and abject desperation all duct-taped together totally works for ‘em. The bummer is—and, listen, I know these guys aren’t exactly renowned for their great recordings, and they don’t need to be—but the sound quality on this record is so bad that the music itself loses almost all meaning for me. It’s distracting as hell. The drums and vocals are super buried, and the guitars are so hot and bright they almost sound like radio static. The whole thing is just rough. I didn’t think I was a snob that got all up in arms about recording quality, but sheesh. Anyway, if you’re one of those folks who can look past that (hear past that?), Unfun’s still doing what they do, and there’s a lot to like on this one-sided, seven-song 12”.  –Keith Rosson (Dead Broke)


UNKNOWN COMPONENT:
Arbitrary Ambiguity: CD
A one-man endeavor from conception to performance to production, Unknown Component is synth/program-heavy, reverb-saturated mellow rock. Calming and a bit soporific, but it is well executed and would’ve fit in nicely in 4AD’s stable of bands during that label’s heyday.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Unknown Component, unknowncomponent.com)


UNRESTRAINED:
Forward onto Death: LP
Unrestrained have been kicking around the hardcore underworld for some time now, churning out near-perfect ‘90s-style heavy hardcore over a slew of 7”s and comp tracks, and finally just recently dropped its first LP. It was well worth the wait. To my ears, the most obvious influence here is Harvest: the vocal style, the open chugs, the dissonant chords and melodic flourishes, all of it is reminiscent of Minneapolis’s finest (including the extended Harvest family—Threadbare, Krakatoa). Unrestrained isn’t a straight-up clone though. I’m hearing elements of Torn Apart, Kiss It Goodbye (whose frontman, the inimitable Tim Singer, guests on the track “Framework”), Trial, Strain, For The Love Of, One King Down, and plenty more of the somewhat less celebrated heroes of the era. That said, Forward onto Death doesn’t sound like a stale throwback either. The organic but clear production helps keep the record true to the band’s influences while avoiding the occasionally thin and tinny trappings of yesteryear’s more affordable technology. Honestly, I could go on about this record for a solid hour or so (for one thing, I haven’t even touched on the terrific, insightful lyrics) but I think I’ve done enough fawning for now. If the above name drops intrigue you at all, check this out as soon as you can. It’s phenomenal.  –Dave Williams (Trip Machine Laboratories, tripmachinelabs.com)


UNWED:
“Made Of” b/w “Pope”: 7”
I wasn’t sure what I was expecting when I first put on Unwed, but it was not what I thought it would be. To say I was blown away would be like describing a Cat 5 hurricane as a slight breeze. The two tracks on this 7” are dark, brooding, but also insanely damn catchy. After listening to both sides of this over a dozen times, I still wanted more. Each song is built on prominent bass lines, surrounded by layer upon layer of textured guitar riffs, including lots of reverb. It’s a perfect home for Neltie Penman’s simultaneously beautiful and creepy vocals. At times, Penman sounds like a possessed Debbie Harry haunting the building that used to be CBGB’s. It’s a dichotomy that perfectly fits the band’s sound. The rest of Unwed’s lineup includes Hot Water Music’s Jason Black, Arty Shepherd of Primitive Weapons, Jeff Gensterblum of Small Brown Bike, and guitarist Matt Kane. Unwed more than lives up to their collective pedigree, with tunes that I found both more nuanced and more enjoyable than many of the members’ established projects. –Paul J. Comeau (No Idea)


VAMPIRES:
Every Kind of Light EP: Cassette
Vampires wrench out a racket which hits the ethereal/atmospheric heights of Juno, the creepy yowling of David Thomas, the jagged guitar counterpoint of the Measure [S.A.], and the anthemic release of Hot Water Music, all without sounding like anyone but themselves. All this despite being a two-piece: guitarist David Dobbs has chops enough to pull off all of the above idioms and drummer Matthew Powers is aptly named. These guys slay. Release of the issue for me (and in an issue full of strong competition). Oh jeez, I’m gushing. You know what? Who cares? They rule. More, please!  –Michael T. Fournier (vampiresband.bandcamp.com)


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