Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:Webcomic Wednesdays #121
· 2:Patrick Houdek Photo Column – Off With Their Heads
· 3:Webcomic Wednesdays #119
· 4:#356 with Samantha Beerhouse
· 5:Top 5s From Issue #85


Subscriptions
Renewal
New Subscriptions
Stickers and Buttons
"Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Razorcake #86
Wailing Of a Town, by Craig Ibarra
Razorcake #85
Pale Angels, Imaginary People LP
Toys That Kill / Joyce Manor, Split 7"


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

Imprint Indie Printing

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

BINGERS, THE:
Gonna Get You: 7”
Night has fallen quicker than you expected. There’s a fog rolling in. That fog looks the way the fuzz on this record sounds, like there’s a good chance that you could get lost in it and never make it back. You drive into it anyway, because you’ve gotta escape. This is the perfect soundtrack—the B-side, specifically—which kicks off with the plaintive “Hideous Heart.” The yelling seems distant. Maybe if you drive faster, you can get to it, and maybe it will have the answers you need. Or maybe not. Maybe you’ll just have to keep listening.  –MP Johnson (Tall Pat)


BLACK PLANET:
Betty No: 7” Flexi
The flexi craze is really taking off. I mean, when Pirates Press got their machine (presumably the old Eva-Tone press?) up and running, I was intrigued like everyone else. After all, it’s an affordable, interesting twist on a standard record. But I can honestly say I never expected to see so many. I suppose I simply presumed that people wouldn’t be open to paying the same price as a seven inch for one of these plastic tampons, but what do I know. Apparently, people are into them, so that’s cool. I’m still on the fence, but this here “Betty No” track by Black Planet is swaying me into the “yes” direction, since it’s a great tune. Post-punk/new wave with female vocals, done strikingly well and enjoyable enough to dig deeper and track down other releases by this band. This is a picture disc flexi as well, I should add.  –Steve Adamyk (Let’s Pretend)


BLACKBIRD RAUM:
Under the Starling Host: LP
Pop quiz, class. Please circle the correct answer. Under the Starling Host is: A) straight-up, unabashed anarcho-folk. B) an excellent document to illustrate that Blackbird Raum will make a solid living as a post-apocalyptic marching band once the world’s plummeted into a terminal ruination. C) showcasing a buoyant merging of Celtic, klezmer, and folk influences. D) similar in scope and tone to bands like Mischief Brew, Bedlam Rovers, Ramshackle Glory, and some of the Taxpayers material. E) a well executed record, if a bit of a muffled one. F) clearly a labor of love by all those involved, as there’s new and wonderful full-color cover art by Joshum Hardy, as well as an accompanying color poster, insert, and stickers. G) All of the above. (Answer on pg. 456.) –Keith Rosson (1859)


BLEST MESS:
The Album: CD
Frontwoman Chris Crash sounds exactly like the singer of the New York Rel-X, but when ten minutes of internet searching did not yield confirmation, I left it at that. Regardless, Blest Mess play, by their own description, old school punk and hardcore, and they’ve got the chops for it. This is a really solid record, and the sound reminds me of the snotty sensibility of Blanks 77 intertwined with the searing fury of the Distillers. Lyrically, the content relies on traditional punk rock themes of scorn, derision, and alienation, and I’m not sad about that. Good record.  –The Lord Kveldulfr (Street Urchin)


BORN WRONG:
Art District: EP
You can’t go wrong with a record that opens up with a fast drum fill and kicks into full-on madness. “Two Faces” is a smasher and basher that gives way to the title track that is actually deserving of the designation: fast as hell and rabid as fuck. Having the bass take over the second half at the end is primo, especially when everyone else piles back in. The vocals are at their best on this one. Then there’s the blazing “Catholic Stare”—with its teeth-rattling bass thundering over the rapid-fire percussion—and good move on slowing down slightly on the closer, “Reaching for Nothing.” Leaves a lasting impression.  –Matt Average (Schizophrenic)


BOXKITE:
Demo EP: 7”
I liked Boxkite’s 2013 demo featuring four tracks of crisp, melodic hardcore, hence I was quick to order this on its release. However, in the intervening time, the band has all but discarded the tunes in favor of a more forceful approach. A mass of brooding basslines accompany a guitar which adds a hefty crunch into the mix, resulting in an impact not too dissimilar to concrete hitting bone. Gears are shifted up and down throughout and there’s a palpable sense of anticipation generated as the slower passages gain momentum before heading into a more frenetic onslaught. Good stuff.  –Rich Cocksedge (Tangled Talk, Andrej@tangledtalk.com, tangledtalk.com / Boslevan, boslevanrecords.co.uk)


BOYS ORDER:
“Tomorrow Dancing” b/w “Danger! Danger!”: 7”
On side A, we learn that if the Epoxies controlled Blondie remotely like robotic surgeons, the first thing they would do is make them learn Japanese, the second thing would be to make them snort helium, and the third thing would be to have them record a demo for Helen Love. On side B, we learn that they’d also make them buy the storm trooper armor from that Mad Capsule Markets video on eBay. You’re going to buy this record for the cover anyway, so don’t spend a lot of time trying to make sense of this review. BEST SONG AND SONG TITLE: “Tomorrow Dancing.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: “Danger! Danger!” exhibits spaces between the words and exclamation points on the cover, but not on the label.  –Rev. Norb (Secret Mission)


BROKEDOWNS, THE:
Life Is a Breeze: CD/LP
“The Brokedowns go to the Beach.” It’s not just the palm tree imagery or the lyrical allusions to sand, waves, or tans; this album’s got some serious beach punkvibes. Before you start imagining White Wires or Guantanamo Baywatch or what-the-fuck-ever else “beach punk” means to you though, remember that we are still talking about The Brokedowns: the gruffest, heaviest, meanest-sounding band in DIY punk. The record recalls the tropical guitar riffage from the band’s 2010 song, “ApocalypseSeasideHeights,” expands on it, and spreads it across an album. But as the most creative band in our scene, they’ve got plenty of other tricks up their sleeve, so don’t think this is some one-note show. There’s nothing beachy about the title track and when the guitar riff creeps across the bridge, it’s so calculated and evil that I’m pretty sure it could fucking kill people. And the song’s refrain—that “life is a breeze—at least it’s always for me”—is the kind of sardonic, pissfaced snark that makes my insides smile… Let’s just say it’s the best album of 2014. Pick it up if you like Insomniac, Witches With Dicks, or anything catchy and caustic.  –Sam North (Red Scare)


BURNT ONES / MALLARD, THE:
Split: 7”EP
The Mallard are no longer, but they offered up this last split before their, well, split. Their side of the single, “Shreds,” has an enthralling psych garage sound. Greer McGettrick’s vocals reverberate with a haunting echo, almost like they bounce back and forth off the strums and melody of the guitar. It’s damn good. Flip to the other side, Burnt Ones is really an apt name for their super fuzzed-out, thick-as-smoke tune “Glass Dream R.I.P.s.”—dreamy garage, heavy guitar, and sly vocals with plenty of reverb. Another solid single off of Mt. St. Mtn. –Camylle Reynolds (Mt. St. Mtn.)


CANCERS:
Fatten the Leeches: LP
At some point it apparently became cool to mix sludgy dream pop with punk? I’m down with that. So long as there are bands as good as Cancers dishing out their mad science. If I’m remembering my band trees correctly (and, granted, my dendrology hasn’t been up to snuff lately) there’s a member of Unfun in this band. Not that it really matters, because the musical similarities between these two acts are so minute it’s only relevant as a piece of trivia. This record is great though. Like, really, really great. You’re all wasting your time as I fruitlessly try to describe this record to you when you should be listening to this record. Those of you who have already heard this album are excused. Grade: A.  –Bryan Static (Dead Broke)


CAPITALIST KIDS:
At a Loss: LP
Smell is like, what?... sixty percent of taste? At a Loss smells great, like a big tub of popcorn. It’s on one of the best pop punk labels around and the songs are tight and full of hooks. But the freakin’ concession stand kid over-seasoned it with Masked Intruder “oooo’s” and “aaahhh’s” and the Skiba-styled vocals are that hateful half-popped kernel that makes you think you broke a filling. Lyrics about ecology, gender, and racism wedged between the love songs (and a song starting the LP about not giving a fuck if you don’t want politics and pop punk mixed) make for a valiant effort.  –Matt Seward (It’s Alive / Toxic Pop)


CASTRO:
Nocturnally Yours: 7” EP
Slick record cover, first riffs sounded hella rock… uh oh. Wait… what’s this?? Amazing female vocals?? Synapses start snapping. Sounds familiar. Head nods, more guitars. This is great, really great. More pulses through the brain. Life But How To Live It? from Norway, that’s what the vocals sound like, a real fave from the ‘80s. The music is pretty slick but works just fine, almost like the first Ten Foot Pole album (that’s a compliment, by the way). After a few spins I check my facts and, low and behold, the vocalist is Katja from Life But How To Live It? I can’t remember what I had for breakfast but can spot a vocal from twenty years ago. Other members have done time in well-known Norwegian bands like Angor Wat and seem to be even older than me! This is fantastic, driving punk with great songwriting and those vocals? Oy vey. Get. On. It.  –Tim Brooks (Boss Tuneage)


CATHOLIC GUILT:
Self-titled: LP
A heady mix of “classic” hardcore, arty sensibilities, and a deep, dark undertow from a seriously good Austrian unit. The tempos are kept right around second gear and the song lengths are trim, but they cram a helluva lot of chord structures, droning guitars, and really good ideas in every available space. At times, I’m hearing early Die Kreuzen and TSOL mixed in equal measure, which is no small feat. Really fuggin’ impressive this is and an instant fan am I. –Jimmy Alvarado (Dirt Cult)


CAVES:
Leaving: 12”
It’s not easy to stand out among the current crop of melodic punk rock bands. I’m referring specifically to the rawer, rougher, oft-mislabeled-as-simply-pop-punk bands that’d be right at home at, say, Fest or in the pages of, say, Razorcake. And yet, Caves manages to tower head and shoulders above most of its peers in terms of songwriting quality and, most importantly, sincerity of delivery. Lou’s voice especially, has a desperate, passionate je-ne-sais-quoi that just reaches into my chest and tears my unsuspecting heart out. Pleading, hopeful lyrics, powerful voices, and a backdrop of fresh yet unmistakably post-Lookout/Rugger Bugger/etc. punk rock (complete with plenty of whoas that skillfully avoids cliché). Caves is simply one of the best in the genre right now.  –Dave Williams (Specialist Subject)


CAVES:
Leaving: CD
It’s always good to hear new material from a favorite band and realize that it’s even better than previous releases. Caves’ Leavingis a prime example of this and is evidence of the band’s continued evolution. In comparison to 2013’s Betterment, this record takes on more of a garage punk quality with an all-encompassing warm fuzziness permeating the songs, which brings out the best of both Lou Hannam and Jonathan Minto’s vocals. Hannam’s guitar sound is the clincher for me, as it has a beautifully deep resonance, perfect for chords and scratchy solos alike—a wonderful aural experience.  –Rich Cocksedge (Specialist Subject)


CHARLEY FEW, THE:
Punk Fire Never Die: LP
This streetpunk, oi trio from Philadelphia is not pushing a lot of musical boundaries here with songs like “New Boots” and “Last Call!” On the other hand, skinheads and punks who enjoy the likes of the Business, the Last Resort, and Evil Conduct aren’t known for wanting to explore new approaches to music, philosophy, or fashion. For those who are holding on, tried and true ‘til death, The Charley Few should fit like your favorite Fred Perry shirt or pair of Doc Marten boots. See you droogs in the pit!  –John Mule (Self-released)


CHARLIE TWEDDLE:
Fantastic: Greatest Hits: LP
As much of a ripple as the reissue of this lost psychedelic gem has caused in small circles, I find it kind of boring. When the songs occasionally get going, they’re interesting and well performed. But there seems to me a fine line between outsider art and just a guy dicking around on acid. Some lore really services itself better staying lore. I might be a philistine, but it’s not fun to listen to long tape pauses and mumbled speculation. I see the value in the songwriting here and I see the value of the experimentation. There are moments where crickets and odd electronically enhanced noises create some hope and atmosphere. Tweedle has a great voice and a command of his abilities when he plays. But at some point a banana is just a banana. It just doesn’t come together for me. This album is a record of a talented guy who discovered LSD. I know I’m supposed to find that charming; maybe I’m just not in the mood today. To those who dissent my opinion about it, I have to ask: have you put this album on more than once? I was more intrigued by his $1,000 cowboy hats online. He makes a great hat. Seriously.  –Billups Allen (ever/never)


CHERIE CHERIE:
Share: LP
I don’t want to call this “desert psych-rock” because that sounds like unlistenable festival trash made by bros who never take their sunglasses off. But Cherie Cherie is both pretty damn listenable—how’s that for compliment of the year—and pretty representative of what I wish desert psych-rock meant. Maybe shoegaze or buzzy alt-pop à la Jesus And Mary Chain is a better reference point. Whatever label you want to slap on it, this is a winner for those who like their pop dreamy but heavy. The vocals are breathy and powerful, and the pace never exceeds a pleasant, plodding sort of drone. The result is something simple, natural, and much less ironic than the retro artwork (bell-bottomed typography and a stylized headshot of Cher morphing into a prickly pear cactus) led me to expect.  –Indiana Laub (Gilgongo)


CHUD:
Nice Guy: Cassette
“Nice Guy” is a no-frills ‘80s punk two-song cassette from this band out of Bloomington, Indiana. The A-side sounds like your pick of any various ‘80s Midwest hardcore bands, while the flip is less hardcore and more KBD/Bloodstains-influenced. It’s snotty and over in a flash, just like it should be.  –Mark Twistworthy (Let’s Pretend)


CIGARETTE CROSSFIRE:
Self-titled: CD
This took me a lot of listens to finally warm to it. They have a different vocalist, Matti, who sounds a little similar to Jere from the In Between the Cure and the Disease album, but does not have the emotional depth that Jere possessed. So that really put me off, but I’m starting to come around. Also, the material on here is not as consistently strong. “Pill Pusher” is not without its merits, such as the chorus, but they start to sound like every other modern day pop punk band with the “whoa-oh-oh” thing, and this is a band that can do much better than that (just check out the chorus and vocal interplay in the song “Ready to Go”). In fact, the album bogs down during the stretch of songs “Pill Pusher,” “Gunpoint,” and “Lies.” It’s when they play songs like “Rise Above,” “Graveyard” (the change-up at the end of the songs is great!) and “Face My Enemy” is when they are at their strongest, showing off their finest traits, which are fast-paced tempos that are urgent and catchy, along with some well-crafted lyrics, like “You are an effigy / The face of my enemy” from “Face My Enemy,” or the seriously great “I am afraid, but not of you / I’m afraid that I’ll become like you / and that the world will never change” from “Stained,” or the entirety of the previously mentioned “Rise Above.” For the uninitiated, think of Leatherface, but with more fire and drive, and less morose. By all means check this out, but I urge you to listen to the In Between the Cure and the Disease album as well.  –Matt Average (Waterslide)


CJ RAMONE:
Last Chance to Dance: CD
Upon first seeing this fall out of the bag of media mail, I was a bit fearful that this might be little more than useless Ramones-esque dreck, rehashing that sound for the sake of audience appeal and/or lack of identity beyond an erstwhile association with such a legendary outfit. Much to my surprise and delight, however, this is much more pop punk than I would have thought—straightforward and no-nonsense as one would expect from a bass dude of the Ramones—but with a lot more hooks and complexity than I expected. Mr. C.J. has created a good, solid punk rock record. Had I not known who it was, I would have guessed only at a Ramones influence rather than a pedigree. Hats off!  –The Lord Kveldulfr (Fat)


CJ RAMONE:
Last Chance to Dance: LP
On the plus side of non-Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee CJ Ramone’s new album, he manages to sound reasonably Ramone-y ((i’m thinkin’ Animal Boy and maybe the good tracks off of Halfway to Sanity, that era)) without sounding like a complete stylistic slave to his former masters, adds some cool harmonies, delves into the occasional straight-up punked-out Buddy Holly four-chord bopper like you wish the Ramones would have done more often over the last ten or fifteen years of their careers ((“One More Chance”)), and delivers a decent Alice Cooper cover ((“Long Way to Go”)). On the minus side, one’d like to think that, were the Ramones still a going concern, Joey would have found some way to filter some of the blatant bozo fuck-and-chuck aspects out of a song like “Pit Stop” ((then again, Joey was the guy who wrote “Go Home Ann,” so what the fuck do I know)), and, if I wanted to listen to music made by right-leaning ex-servicemen who like guns and think Obama is a “disgrace to God and country,” i’d go down to the fucking plant and give my co-workers a bunch of guitars. Kind of a wash, all told. BEST SONG: “One More Chance.” BEST SONG TITLE: “Last Chance to Dance.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Steve Soto of Agent Orange/Adolescent fame is on guitar, and Tony Cadena sings the Alice Cooper cover.  –Rev. Norb (Fat)


CLOSET BURNER:
Self-titled: 12”EP
Closet Burner crank out short, sharp blasts of hardcore thrash that are straight to the point, lyrically and musically. Sometimes they slow down just a smidge, displaying a catchy side, like in the very short “Gay Majority” and “The Beast.” Musically, they remind me of Capitalist Casualties, a little bit of Infest and similar bands of that nature. The entire record revolves around gay rights, and it’s nice to see/hear them get across the anger and frustration and not go the campy route, unlike some bands I dare not mention. They come out swinging right from the start with “Under the Radar” and keep on going until they end with the Warpath cover of “Abomination” with the apt chorus of “Fuck you, I’m queer.”  –Matt Average (Reality Is A Cult)


CLOUD RAT:
Moksha: LP
Holy sweet Christ. I’m already embarrassed as I write it, but here goes:there’s grind and then there’s Cloud Rat. Goddamn. I can see why this record has been repressed a bajillion times. Flawless, fierce as nails, punishing, precise, just jaw-droppingly good. This a genre that almost always bores the living shit out of me, but there’s something here that’s tempering the blast beats and cranium piercing and placing Moshka head and shoulders above its peers. I don’t know if it’s the way the band occasionally lets the instrumentation breathe a bit, or the way the fury is tempered with a few surprising and downright haunting interludes, but everything here—every note and scream and subdued, layered tidbit of background collage, every bit of minutiae—seems entirely intentional and perfectly placed. This is a fucking great record. It just came out of nowhere and laid me to the quick.  –Keith Rosson (IFB)


COLA BOYS:
Self-titled: 7”
I think I have to wash my record needle after playing this. The music seems to be made out of some kind of black, sticky tar. No matter what speed I play it at, it sounds wrong and infectious. Not infectious in a good way, but in an actual infection sort of way, like this pus-gunk is going to slime its way up the needle and off the record player and come over to me as I sit on my couch. It’s going to insert itself into my veins, making me speed up and slow down simultaneously until I just fall apart. This 7” should come with antibiotics. –MP Johnson (Fuck CDs)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player



·HELL-O-HILL
·MANGINA
·CATALYST, THE
·DISRESPECT
·THIS MOMENT IN BLACK HISTORY
·Issue #39 DVD Reviews
·RIP OFFS
·DAGGERS, THE
·BRAINERD


Razorcake Tattoo = Lifetime Sub



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.