Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























· 1:Exclusive Stream from Mischief Brew
· 2:Webcomic Wednesdays #115
· 3:#352 with Juan Espinosa
· 4:Kelly Lone Photo Column - Rational Anthem
· 5:9/11, Never Let Me Forget


Subscriptions
New Subscriptions
Renewal
Stickers and Buttons
"Because We're Fuckin' Classy" Koozie


Razorcake #85
Pale Angels, Imaginary People LP
Toys That Kill / Joyce Manor, Split 7"
Tenement, Bruised Music, Volume One LP
Razorcake Punx Por Vida T-shirt


Can't find Razorcake at your favorite store? Lend us a hand and we'll send you a free issue.



Razorcake will send you one free issue if you ask your librarian if they would carry Razorcake in their stacks. (This offer is good for both traditional libraries and independent libraries.) To get the free issue, you must send us the librarian's name and email and the library's postal address. We will then contact them directly and donate a subscription to them. U.S. libraries only, due to postage.

No Idea Records

Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

1971:
Self-titled: Cassette
While I felt like the band kiiiinda noodled on too long in the majority of these songs for my personal tastes, there’s no refuting that there’s some real power here, and 1971 has, hands down, some of the most impressive lyrics I’ve read in some time. Smart, agile, and thoughtful stuff that seamlessly merges the personal and political. And if some of the songs work from a kind of odd and stumbling doom/punk amalgam, or even a manic, caffeine-heavy version of indie stuff ala old Crackerbash—who 1971 has almost assuredly never heard, so that’s probably just me—that’s okay, because when these guys are on, they are seriously on. I’m personally a fan of brevity as far as chops go, so this probably won’t get a lot of repeat listens, but I’m sure there’s plenty out there who’d go bananas for these dudes.  –Keith Rosson (Faxed)


1984:
Specjalny Rodzaj Kontrastu: LP
I only have my own boring historical context with which to review this album. The lyrics and notes are in Polish and I’m not sure who this album is made for, save an emerging scene and/or a continuation of an existing interest in dark electronic pop I’m not familiar with. When I was younger (yawn) D.C. had a very small punk scene. I was too young to be fully involved in the really historical stuff, but there were places to hang out and many groups were fairly accepting of anything. This reminds me of music played in clubs at this time. It’s slow, electric, minimal, and goth-like (as much as I understood goth at the time). Not the mall goth, but the people actually hanging out in dark places—meaning goths who turned twenty-one, probably. I had very wide eyes then; everything was impressive to me. This music is mysterious, but only in that I haven’t heard anything like it in awhile and I don’t understand Polish. What I mean is: I either don’t get it, or it’s made for people like me, which I doubt very much. Either way, it’s very well done. As a point of reference, I don’t really like The Faint, although I sort of understand why some people might. It doesn’t sound like that sort of thing, but the sort of thing that a person who likes The Faint might smoke a joint to.  –Billups Allen (Pasazer)


ACID BABY JESUS:
Selected Recordings: CD
Acid Baby Jesus sound exactly like you’d expect based on their moniker. Yet, this Greek psychedelic ensemble eschews the common “throwback band” pitfalls of nostalgia and mimicry. Their utilization of eclectic instruments and minimal lyrics packed with mythical and literary allusion create an atmospheric sound that is interesting and authentic. It threatens to fall apart for me around “Who’s First”—the lyrics for which were “found and collaged” whatever that means; art, man—and again on “I’m Becoming a Man,” which boast prima facie effemimanic messages. Not sure whether these sentiments comment on Athens’ human rights issues or spawn from them—though the track “Night of Pan” invokes infamous half ‘mo Aleister Crowley—but I like the music enough to pretend Acid Baby Jesus get to use the word “faggot” because they themselves are mad gay.  –Kelley O’Death (Slovenly)


ACID BABY JESUS:
Selected Recordings: LP
Psych rock is a bit tricky to pull off with any effectiveness. Lose your footing and you’re sliding down a very slippery slope into a rather deep puddle of pretentiousness. ABJ are good at knowing where to go next, adroitly avoiding overt Pink Floyd worship while still recalling the heavily dosed experimentation of that band’s early years and knowing that changing things up and throwing in a teensy bit o’ pop can go a long way. “Head” music of fine vintage here.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Slovenly)


AGATA:
Promo: CDEP-R
I got excited when I opened this one because I thought it was going to be Seattle queercore band Agatha. What a difference a letter makes. Imagine if Agnostic Front and Coliseum were roommates and the apartment always smelled like sweat and dank nugs. This is the sonic equivalent of that. It works, though, kinda like a pit bull St. Bernard mix, that is to say loud and heavy. There are only three tracks on here. I hope to hear more from these guys.  –Lisa Weiss (Agata Industries, agataindustries.bandcamp.com)


AGATHA:
Gravis Atque Gravior: LP
This is the Italian Agatha, not the band from Olympia, and they’re a drums-and-bass two-piece, but with none of the ickiness that that implies. Gravis Atque Gravior (Latin for Heavier and Heavier) is a dark and brooding thing, riff-heavy and menacing, and, if nothing else, remarkable for its fullness of sound. This record sounds like a lot more than two people at work. Unfortunately to my uneducated ear, words like “stoner doom” keep coming to mind—they just have this tendency to ride a slow and singular riff into oblivion—but preferences notwithstanding, the band is certainly excellent at what they do.  –Keith Rosson (Chaos Rurale)


ALCOHOL FUELED:
Self-titled: Cassette
This studied seven-song streetpunk demo from Ottawa has a heavy Ripcordz influence, confirming my suspicion that Canadian streetpunk has its own distinguished set of tropes and traditions. Clean, but not overproduced, this demo is supposedly a precursor to a full-length that is due out in 2015. Clearly fueled by more than alcohol, these guys can play. Sounding like something that would have appeared on the Pogo Attack compilation in the ‘90s, Alcohol Fueled makes me nostalgic for that fun-filled resurgence period of this subgenre. Watch for Alcohol Fueled if you’re into street sounds. This is easily one of the better releases of this type to emerge in ages, and it’s only a demo!  –Art Ettinger (Obnoxio Drunk Punk)


ALIANS:
Gavroche: LP
Want to learn more about Polish punk? I know I do. Here’s a twentieth anniversary reissue of a classic, crunchy, Crass-influenced release from the 1990s. There’s a lot of junky weird interludes, flutes, and accordions at work. But when it gets moving, it moves. The vocals are completely fucking zany, and the fast breakneck speed is welcome when compared to the creepy bits between tracks. Pasażer is a label that specializes in fancy packaging, with them pulling out all the stops for Gavroche, including a cool foldout poster lyric sheet. Even the most peaceful of peace punks will want to break shit upon spinning this apparent classic, which is brimming with rage. –Art Ettinger (Pasażer)


ALPHABET CULT / ELEPHANT RIFLE:
Split: 7”
Your parents’ basement carpet smells like old smoke. No light, save the TV glow from the Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla VHS you’re watching in slow motion. You peaked about thirty minutes ago. Alphabet Cult, with their raw and metallic-heavy desert psych, provide your Man’s Ruin aesthetic soundtrack. Elephant Rifle wake you the next morning with their bending nightmare assault of early Unwound hangover headache. Recommended if your definition of “punk” is “do what you want.” Labels are reversed, so careful choosing your favorite side.  –Matt Seward (Self-released)


ALPHABET CULT:
Self-titled: Cassette
My severe marijuana allergy has me at a bit of a loss while trying to connect to Reno trio Alphabet Cult’s self-described “noise/stoner/yarn art rock,” but their post-punk aspirations on tracks such as “Overt” resonate with the lukewarm Fugazi fan in me. Talky vocals provided by guitarist Cyril Beatty and bassist Leah Ruby’s occasional pubescent boy vocal cracks play well with the dirty, noisy production, as drummer Darren Barnes stays high on his cymbals like he’s playing a game of “hot lava” with the rest of his kit. The acid trip lyrics scattered throughout the ten tracks on this eponymous cassette—most notably on the spooky intro to “The Whiteness” and the early Les Savy Fav-infused “Child 5”—probably sidle close to whatever “yarn art rock” means, but I’m not cool enough to know for sure.  –Kelley O’Death (Intruder Alert!)


AMEN:
Live 1992: 7”
Straightforward hardcore punk from Poland, recorded live in 1992. Think Insted’s sturdy beats fused with the berserker approach of Dutch hardcore heroes BGK. Despite being a live punk recording, the quality is most certainly top notch and holds up pretty well for being well over twenty years old. A live set on vinyl is not my preferred introduction to a band, but in Amen’s case I’ll overlook that minor detail.  –Juan Espinosa (Pasazer, pasazer.pl / Stary Cap)


AMERICAN HERITAGE:
Prolapse: LP
American Heritage was a long-running stoner sludge band with the Motörhead-meets-Melvins sound that was really popular in the ‘00s. This is their final release, and feels like a last gasp—six originals and three covers from a bulldozer of a band just starting to sound dated.  –Chris Terry (Solar Flare)


ANTIDONT’S, THE:
32 oz. to Failure: CD-R
Beach bro skater punk for beach bro skater punks with inarticulate frustrations with the system (see, e.g., songs such as “Don’t Worm Our Chicks” and “Fuck Your Institutions”). Thought the title might a redeeming jab at Sublime, but then came the unexpected upstrokes on the penultimate track—at least it still shows that they are self-aware.  –Vincent Battilana (theantidonts.bandcamp.com)


APACHE DROPOUT:
Heavy Window: CD
Eleven fuzz-drenched numbers straight outta Indiana are coming for your eardrums. This is not the next big thing but rather some reverberating heavy-on-the-backbeat, good ol’ garage rock. It’s got an especially murky, swampy quality that’s pleasing to these ears, like The Cramps cleaned up to go to college or like an unironic Make-Up. Fun. A keeper.  –Lisa Weiss (Magnetic South)


A-TOWN SLUTS:
Steal Your Drugs: CD-R
Juvenile. Thoughtless. Unoriginal. Given the content of this disc, I think that the band members would tend agree that these adjectives aptly describe them. However, we’d probably disagree on whether these are positive things to say about their moronic, wastoid punk. The least stupid and immature point on here is their cover of GG’s “Bite It You Scum,” if that’s any indication of what you’re dealing with here. Sources of lyrical inspiration include the classic Jack and the Beanstalk, as they lift the Mighty Giant’s catch phrase “fe fi fo fum” for the beginning of one track. The music itself is fair enough, but the vocals are a goddamn tragedy, taking the punk ethic of “no talent needed” to mean, “no effort allowed.” I don’t know which question was more prevalent in my mind during the course of listening to this disc: “Why didn’t they mix the vox down into oblivion?” or “Why am I still listing to this?” If you want a free copy of this, you can sort through my trash.  –Vincent Battilana (atownsluts.bandcamp.com)


AUTARKEIA / ME AND GOLIATH:
Split: LP
Both bands mix ‘90s-style chaotic hardcore with something crustier. Me And Goliath are especially heavy without sacrificing tunefulness, bringing to mind black metal-influenced hardcore bands like Union Of Uranus and One Eyed God Prophecy. Autarkeia’s winding, syncopated guitar lines hint at something cool to come, but the songs are sloppy and overlong. I suspect that their next release will come together with more confidence.  –Chris Terry (city17records.bandcamp.com)


BAD NERVE:
Self-titled: 7” EP
Another slab of clean-channel proto-hardcore worship from Umea here. Dual male/female vocals, punchy delivery, and attitude just oozin’ out of its pores. Fuck yeah.  –Jimmy Alvarado (Ny Vag)


BAT BITES, THE:
Self-titled: CD
If you’re still lamenting the loss of Lookout Records, you might like this disc. The Bat Bites deliver masked and caped pop punk straight from the ‘90s. They’ve got the riffs. They’ve got the solos. They’ve got the singalongs. But everything’s too slick. Production-wise, the music leans too close to the pop side of the spectrum. I need more rough edges. I need something to grab onto so I don’t slide right through an album like it’s an aural slip-and-slide. I just couldn’t find it here.  –MP Johnson (Monster Zero)


BINGERS, THE:
Gonna Get You: 7”
Night has fallen quicker than you expected. There’s a fog rolling in. That fog looks the way the fuzz on this record sounds, like there’s a good chance that you could get lost in it and never make it back. You drive into it anyway, because you’ve gotta escape. This is the perfect soundtrack—the B-side, specifically—which kicks off with the plaintive “Hideous Heart.” The yelling seems distant. Maybe if you drive faster, you can get to it, and maybe it will have the answers you need. Or maybe not. Maybe you’ll just have to keep listening.  –MP Johnson (Tall Pat)


BLACK PLANET:
Betty No: 7” Flexi
The flexi craze is really taking off. I mean, when Pirates Press got their machine (presumably the old Eva-Tone press?) up and running, I was intrigued like everyone else. After all, it’s an affordable, interesting twist on a standard record. But I can honestly say I never expected to see so many. I suppose I simply presumed that people wouldn’t be open to paying the same price as a seven inch for one of these plastic tampons, but what do I know. Apparently, people are into them, so that’s cool. I’m still on the fence, but this here “Betty No” track by Black Planet is swaying me into the “yes” direction, since it’s a great tune. Post-punk/new wave with female vocals, done strikingly well and enjoyable enough to dig deeper and track down other releases by this band. This is a picture disc flexi as well, I should add.  –Steve Adamyk (Let’s Pretend)


BLACKBIRD RAUM:
Under the Starling Host: LP
Pop quiz, class. Please circle the correct answer. Under the Starling Host is: A) straight-up, unabashed anarcho-folk. B) an excellent document to illustrate that Blackbird Raum will make a solid living as a post-apocalyptic marching band once the world’s plummeted into a terminal ruination. C) showcasing a buoyant merging of Celtic, klezmer, and folk influences. D) similar in scope and tone to bands like Mischief Brew, Bedlam Rovers, Ramshackle Glory, and some of the Taxpayers material. E) a well executed record, if a bit of a muffled one. F) clearly a labor of love by all those involved, as there’s new and wonderful full-color cover art by Joshum Hardy, as well as an accompanying color poster, insert, and stickers. G) All of the above. (Answer on pg. 456.) –Keith Rosson (1859)


BLEST MESS:
The Album: CD
Frontwoman Chris Crash sounds exactly like the singer of the New York Rel-X, but when ten minutes of internet searching did not yield confirmation, I left it at that. Regardless, Blest Mess play, by their own description, old school punk and hardcore, and they’ve got the chops for it. This is a really solid record, and the sound reminds me of the snotty sensibility of Blanks 77 intertwined with the searing fury of the Distillers. Lyrically, the content relies on traditional punk rock themes of scorn, derision, and alienation, and I’m not sad about that. Good record.  –The Lord Kveldulfr (Street Urchin)


BORN WRONG:
Art District: EP
You can’t go wrong with a record that opens up with a fast drum fill and kicks into full-on madness. “Two Faces” is a smasher and basher that gives way to the title track that is actually deserving of the designation: fast as hell and rabid as fuck. Having the bass take over the second half at the end is primo, especially when everyone else piles back in. The vocals are at their best on this one. Then there’s the blazing “Catholic Stare”—with its teeth-rattling bass thundering over the rapid-fire percussion—and good move on slowing down slightly on the closer, “Reaching for Nothing.” Leaves a lasting impression.  –Matt Average (Schizophrenic)


BOXKITE:
Demo EP: 7”
I liked Boxkite’s 2013 demo featuring four tracks of crisp, melodic hardcore, hence I was quick to order this on its release. However, in the intervening time, the band has all but discarded the tunes in favor of a more forceful approach. A mass of brooding basslines accompany a guitar which adds a hefty crunch into the mix, resulting in an impact not too dissimilar to concrete hitting bone. Gears are shifted up and down throughout and there’s a palpable sense of anticipation generated as the slower passages gain momentum before heading into a more frenetic onslaught. Good stuff.  –Rich Cocksedge (Tangled Talk, Andrej@tangledtalk.com, tangledtalk.com / Boslevan, boslevanrecords.co.uk)


BOYS ORDER:
“Tomorrow Dancing” b/w “Danger! Danger!”: 7”
On side A, we learn that if the Epoxies controlled Blondie remotely like robotic surgeons, the first thing they would do is make them learn Japanese, the second thing would be to make them snort helium, and the third thing would be to have them record a demo for Helen Love. On side B, we learn that they’d also make them buy the storm trooper armor from that Mad Capsule Markets video on eBay. You’re going to buy this record for the cover anyway, so don’t spend a lot of time trying to make sense of this review. BEST SONG AND SONG TITLE: “Tomorrow Dancing.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: “Danger! Danger!” exhibits spaces between the words and exclamation points on the cover, but not on the label.  –Rev. Norb (Secret Mission)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player



·NO BAILS
·CODE OF HONOR
·EXENE CERVENKA AND THE ORIGINAL SINNERS
·BALLS
·ARMY OF PONCH
·KING PRAWN
·YOUNG FAVORITES
·FINALE 95 #3
·Union 13, Civil Duty, All Dead, The Victims, The Getaways


Razorcake Podcasts



If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2011 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.